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Blue Plants: Transgenic Plants with the GUS Reporter Gene
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An investigative laboratory developed for the introductory biology curriculum using transgenic plants ...

An investigative laboratory developed for the introductory biology curriculum using transgenic plants is presented in this chapter. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants we use contain the GUS reporter gene under the control of the cor15a gene promoter, which responds to cold stress. Following induction by cold or other environmental signals, the gusA gene will respond by producing the enzyme beta-glucuronidase (GUS). When plant tissue is incubated with the chromogenic substrate X-gluc, those tissues that produce GUS turn blue. Using investigative experiments, students monitor both the physiological response of plants to these signals, as well as the induction of gene activity as reflected by GUS activity. The GUS assay is highly visible, safe for the undergraduate laboratory, easy to conduct, and relatively inexpensive. Blue Plants, developed at Purdue University with support from NSF-DUE grant #9354721, are one of the Research Link 2000 systems (http://www.researchlink.ferris.edu).

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Lesson Plans
Provider:
Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE)
Author:
Susan J. Karcher
The Power of Genetics: Using Classical and Molecular Genetics to Study "Real" Developmental Phenomena
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The goal of this laboratory exercise is to provide a laboratory experience ...

The goal of this laboratory exercise is to provide a laboratory experience for undergraduates, in which they apply fundamental genetic principles to the study of a complex developmental process, specifically, root cell shape determination in the simple plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In this exercise, students identify putative root cell shape mutants, analyze an F2 segregating population, and finally use molecular techniques to determine where a specific mutation in located within the genome. This exercise can be adapted to study any fundamental developmental process than can be perturbed in Arabidopsis.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Lesson Plans
Provider:
Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE)
Author:
Leonard Pysh