Search Results (12)

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Applying the Scientific Method to Solve a Nursing Problem (Remix)
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Remix and Share
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The purpose of this lesson is for adult learners to improve their communication skills --- specifically reading, writing, speaking and listening --- by using the Scientific Method to solve a nursing problem. The target audience of this lesson is adults at the 12th grade reading and writing levels. This lesson is designed for a face-to-face, instructor-led classroom setting.

Subject:
Applied Science
Career and Technical Education
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Case Study
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Rema Merrick
Date Added:
08/08/2019
Biology
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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Biology is designed for multi-semester biology courses for science majors. It is grounded on an evolutionary basis and includes exciting features that highlight careers in the biological sciences and everyday applications of the concepts at hand. To meet the needs of today’s instructors and students, some content has been strategically condensed while maintaining the overall scope and coverage of traditional texts for this course. Instructors can customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom. Biology also includes an innovative art program that incorporates critical thinking and clicker questions to help students understand—and apply—key concepts.

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
08/22/2012
Biology - Remixed for Austin Community College
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Biology is designed for multi-semester biology courses for science majors. This version has been adapted by faculty at Austin Community College. It is grounded on an evolutionary basis and includes exciting features that highlight careers in the biological sciences and everyday applications of the concepts at hand. To meet the needs of today’s instructors and students, some content has been strategically condensed while maintaining the overall scope and coverage of traditional texts for this course. Instructors can customize the book, adapting it to the approach that works best in their classroom. Biology also includes an innovative art program that incorporates critical thinking and clicker questions to help students understand—and apply—key concepts.

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Date Added:
02/13/2019
Biology - Remixed for Austin Community College, The Study of Life
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Life is all around us, both as multicellular organisms such as the iguana and bamboo above, as well as the unicellular microorganisms such as bacteria.  Life is present on every continent, in the air and in the waters of the world.  There is life even in the Mariana Trench, seven miles below the surface of the ocean.  As of 2010 biologists have described and classified 1.7 million plants and animals, and estimate that there are till over five million species still undiscovered.This chapter will introduce the ways we study the science of Biology in the twenty-first century, the characteristics of living organisms and their classification.

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Biology - Remixed for Austin Community College, The Study of Life, Levels of Organization of Living Things
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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Living things are highly organized and structured, following a hierarchy that can be examined on a scale from small to large. The atom is the smallest and most fundamental unit of matter. It consists of a nucleus surrounded by electrons. Atoms form molecules. A molecule is a chemical structure consisting of at least two atoms held together by one or more chemical bonds. Many molecules that are biologically important are macromolecules, large molecules that are typically formed by polymerization (a polymer is a large molecule that is made by combining smaller units called monomers, which are simpler than macromolecules). An example of a macromolecule is deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) (Figure 1.15), which contains the instructions for the structure and functioning of all living organisms.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Remix
Biology, The Chemistry of Life, The Study of Life, The Science of Biology
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Remix and Share
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Identify the shared characteristics of the natural sciencesSummarize the steps of the scientific methodCompare inductive reasoning with deductive reasoningDescribe the goals of basic science and applied science

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Author:
Tina B. Jones
Biology, The Chemistry of Life, The Study of Life, The Science of Biology
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Identify the shared characteristics of the natural sciencesSummarize the steps of the scientific methodCompare inductive reasoning with deductive reasoningDescribe the goals of basic science and applied science

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Diabetes - A Global Challenge - Translational Metabolism Part 1 (12:56)
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In this presentation we’ll translate our knowledge from genetics into clinically relevant patient stories. We’ll present case stories of translational metabolism, which means that we go from genotype to phenotype. Translational science is a multidisciplinary form of science that bridges the gap between basic science and applied science.

Course responsible: Associate Professor Signe Sørensen Torekov, MD Nicolai Wewer Albrechtsen & Professor Jens Juul Holst

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
EIT
NNF Center for Basic Metabolic Research
University of Copenhagen Department of Biomedical Science
Provider Set:
Diabetes - A Global Challenge
Author:
Assistant Professor Signe Torekov
Date Added:
01/07/2015
The History of Computing, Spring 2004
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Examines the development of computing techniques and technology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly critical evaluation of how the very idea of "computer" changes and evolves over time. Emphasis is on technical innovation, industrial development, social context, and the role of government. Topics include Babbage, Hollerith, differential analyzers, control systems, ENIAC, radar, operations research, computers as scientific instruments, the rise of "computer science," artificial intelligence, personal computers, and networks. Includes class visits by members of the MIT community who have made important historical contributions. This course focuses on one particular aspect of the history of computing: the use of the computer as a scientific instrument. The electronic digital computer was invented to do science, and its applications range from physics to mathematics to biology to the humanities. What has been the impact of computing on the practice of science? Is the computer different from other scientific instruments? Is computer simulation a valid form of scientific experiment? Can computer models be viewed as surrogate theories? How does the computer change the way scientists approach the notions of proof, expertise, and discovery? No comprehensive history of scientific computing has yet been written. This seminar examines scientific articles, participants' memoirs, and works by historians, sociologists, and anthropologists of science to provide multiple perspectives on the use of computers in diverse fields of physical, biological, and social sciences and the humanities. We explore how the computer transformed scientific practice, and how the culture of computing was influenced, in turn, by scientific applications.

Subject:
Computer Science
Linguistics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Gerovitch, Slava
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association - Goodness Gracious Where Have All The Glaciers Gone?
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

Hands-on outdoor lesson plan for students to understand the meaning and components of climate change, and engineer and model how greenhouse gases cause heat trapping.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Education
Elementary Education
Ecology
Hydrology
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Interactive
Lesson
Author:
Abigail Sussman
Date Added:
05/24/2019