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Animal Welfare vs Animal Rights Debate
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 Animal Welfare vs Animal Rights Debate Grade Level: 9th-12thSubject: Animal ScienceDuration: 5 daysDOK Level:  4SAMR Level: Substitution Indiana Standard: AS-7.4 Explain the implications of animal welfare and animal rightsObjective: Given a debated livestock issue related to animal welfare, students will be able to understand both sides of the issue, and effectively persuade others in making a decision about the issue.Procedure: Have the students compare and contrast the terms “animal welfare” and “animal rights”.Have a class discussion on the impact of the differencesGroup the class into partnersHave them research and make a list of five animal right issues related to the agricultural industryHave a class discussion on the topics researched. As a class narrow down the list.Have each pair pull a topic and side out of a hat.Explain the Debate Project expectations and grading rubric.Allow class time for research.Have the students submit a list of statements and supporting facts after day 2.Have the students submit a rough draft of their opening and closing statements after day 3. Debates will be done on day 5Product or Assessment: Students will be graded on their submitted facts and rough draft. The rubric will be used to grade the debate on the given day.Credits: Renee Wangler, Agriscience Instructor - Newaygo County Career-Tech Center 

Subject:
Agriculture
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Macon Beck
Date Added:
07/14/2017
Are Ethics Fixed? Animal Welfare Exercise
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No Strings Attached
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Using the Animal Ethics Dilemma website, this flipped classroom exercise can be used to stimulate discussion about situation ethics in animal welfare

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
04/28/2016
Enhancing Humane Science - Improving Animal Research
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This course provides a broad overview of diverse topics in the practice of and approaches to humane animal experimentation. It addresses such issues as experimental design (including statistics and sample size determination), humane endpoints, environmental enrichment, post-surgical care, pain management, and the impact of stress on the quality of data. It was developed by CAAT director Alan Goldberg and James Owiny, the training and compliance administrator of the Johns Hopkins University animal care and use committee, along with Christian Newcomer, associate provost for animal research and resources at Hopkins.The self-paced course consists of 12 audio lectures with accompanying slides, resource lists, and study questions.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Provider Set:
JHSPH OpenCourseWare
Author:
Alan M. Goldberg
James Owiny
Date Added:
02/14/2013