Search Results (11)

View
Selected filters:
  • Ancient Civilizations
11c. The Inca Empire: Children of the Sun
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The Inca called their empire Tahuantinsuyu, or Land of the Four Quarters. It stretched 2,500 miles from Quito, Ecuador, to beyond Santiago, Chile. Within its domain were rich coastal settlements, high mountain valleys, rain-drenched tropical forests and the driest of deserts. The Inca controlled perhaps 10 million people, speaking a hundred different tongues. It was the largest empire on earth at the time. Yet when Pizarro executed its last emperor, Atahualpa, the Inca Empire was only 50 years old.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
4b. Babylonia
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The Babylonians used the innovations of the Sumerians, added to them, and built an empire that gave the world, among other things, codified laws, a tower that soared above the earth, and one of the Seven Wonders of the World.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Ancient Civilizations
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

To borrow from Dr. Seuss's book title, "Oh the Places You'll Go! Here's a coming attraction of the people, places, ideas, and things coming at you: Your 3.2 million-year-old human ancestor Lucy, mummies, pyramids, Cleopatra, "an eye for an eye", the birth of major religions Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, the birth of democracy, the first Olympics, Julius Caesar, gladiators, the invention of writing, paper, and the wheel, kingdoms built of stone in Africa, the Great Wall of China, the introduction of such concepts as zero, time, and monotheism (the belief in one god), Samurai, martial arts, palaces of gold, and even the Sphinx. Whew! The study of ancient civilizations and people raises some profound questions. Who are humans? Where did we come from? Where are we going? As you explore these civilizations, see if you can make sense of this Sphinxlike statement from author William Faulkner: "The past ...

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Independence Hall Association
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Ancient History Encyclopedia is a non-profit educational website with a global vision: to provide the best ancient history information on the internet for free.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ancient History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Reading
Textbook
Provider:
Ancient History Encyclopedia
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Exploring the World of Ancient Civilizations
Rating

High School Global History teacher Sarah Caufield, from the New York Harbor School, turns the learning of ancient civilizations over to her students as they conduct brief research to share with their peers. Students work in self-selected groups and determine the key information to include on the poster they create about a given ancient civilization. Topics include the function and purpose of the civilization, early writing systems, calendar systems, religion, and goods and trade. Students then participate in a gallery walk where they use a rubric to grade and provide feedback on their classmatesŐ work.Students work very naturally and effectively within teams and across teams and provide feedback openly.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
The Human Past: Introduction to Archaeology, Fall 2006
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Archaeology reconstructs ancient human activities and their environmental contexts. Drawing on case studies in contrasting environmental settings from the Near East and Mesoamerica, considers these activities and the forces that shaped them. In laboratory sessions students encounter various classes of archaeological data and analyze archaeological artifacts made from materials such as stone, bone, ceramics, glass, and metal. These analyses help reconstruct the past. This class introduces the multidisciplinary nature of archaeology, both in theory and practice. Lectures provide a comparative examination of the origins of agriculture and the rise of early civilizations in the ancient Near East and Mesoamerica. The laboratory sessions provide practical experience in aspects of archaeological field methods and analytical techniques including the examination of stone, ceramic, and metal artifacts and bone materials. Lab sessions have occasional problem sets which are completed outside of class.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Harry Merrick
Introduction to the History and Theory of Architecture, Spring 2012
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This course is a global-oriented survey of the history of architecture, from the prehistoric to the sixteenth century. It treats buildings and environments, including cities, in the context of the cultural and civilizational history. It offers an introduction to design principles and analysis. Being global, it aims to give the student perspective on the larger pushes and pulls that influence architecture and its meanings, whether these be economic, political, religious or climatic.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
M.I.T. OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mark Jarzombek
Mali Empire and Djenne Figures
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Archeology offers the most tangible evidence of earlier civilizations. Although archeology has already provided invaluable information pertaining to the life styles and skills of the peoples from this region of West Africa, the archaeological record is still incomplete. The figurative sculptures featured in this resource furnish one part of the historical puzzle of this region. These handsome terracotta sculptures are from the Inland Niger Delta region near Djenne (pronounced JEH-nay; also spelled Jenne), one of several important trading cities that grew and developed during the Mali Empire.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
World History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Provider Set:
National Museum of African Art
Urban Ecosystems 2: Why Are There Cities? A Historical Perspective
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This purpose of this lesson is to understand the importance of food production and food surpluses to the origin and historical development of urban ecosystems. To understand how the exploitation of forests, irrigation waters, and other resources led to catastrophic consequences for some early cities.

This lesson was developed by Dr. Penny Firth, a scientist, as part of a set of interdisciplinary Science NetLinks lessons aimed at improved understanding of environmental phenomena and events. This is the second of a strand of five lessons.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Author:
Dr. Penny Firth