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26c. Women's Rights
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During the era of the "cult of domesticity," a woman was seen merely as a way of enhancing the social status of her husband. By the 1830s and 40s, however, the climate began to change when a number of bold, outspoken women championed diverse social reforms of prostitution, capital punishment, prisons, war, alcohol, and, most significantly, slavery.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
57. Shaping a New America
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In the 1960s, the first baby boomers entered college. These students were the largest class of young Americans ever to enter the halls of ivy. Unlike the "Silent Generation" of 1950s youth, the baby boomers were vocal about reforming democracy in the United States and the American presence abroad.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
57g. Student Activism
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Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) became the leaders of the antiwar movement in America. Drawing support from the civil rights movement, SDS chapters organized local demonstrations on college campuses and marches to the steps of the Capitol Building. They worked in inner cities to provide free lunches and participated in voter drives to turn out the African American electorate in the Deep South. In addition to these causes, the movement was concerned with student rights. Many universities required a dress code, curfews, and restrictions on free speech. As SDS advocated a freer society, they pointed their arguments to their deans as well as their political representatives.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
ACT UP and the AIDS Crisis
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This collection uses primary sources to explore AIDS activism during the 1980s. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbott
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Activate Activism: Creating Our Mural, Part One
Conditions of Use:
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Making art together is one of the most important ways students can engage in a collaborative process, and talk about the messages and methods they believe in. Art takes time and process. Once children have had a chance to look at different symbols and think about the importance of technique, colors, shapes, and styles, it is time with each other and their art materials that will really allow them to express themselves, finding their voices as artists and activists simultaneously.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
11/29/2016
Activate Activism: Creating Our Mural, Part Two
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As students move forward with work on their activist murals, it will be important for them to think about managing their time and materials. It will also be important for them to remind themselves and each other of their messages and ultimate goals. Continuing work on an ongoing project can be challenging for some children, but it is an important part of developing an identity as someone who does good and important work. Make sure you show respect for the challenging aspects of this activity as your students move ahead with their mural.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
11/29/2016
Activism in the US
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The United States has a long history of activists seeking social, political, economic, and other changes to America—along with a history of other activists trying to prevent such changes. American activism covered a wide range of causes and utilized many different forms of activism. American sociopolitical activism became especially prominent during the period of societal upheaval which began during the 1950s. The African American civil rights movement led the way, soon followed by a substantial anti-war movement opposing American involvement in the Vietnam War, and later by vigorous activism involving women’s issues, gay rights, and other causes. The United States remains a land of nearly constant change, and activists play a significant role in the ongoing evolution of American democracy. It seems likely that Americans will remain enthusiastic activists in the future. This exhibition is part of the Digital Library of Georgia.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Library of Georgia
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
The American Abolitionist Movement
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the American Abolitionist Movement. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
10/20/2015
American Political Thought, Spring 2004
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This course surveys American political thought from the colonial era to the present. Required readings are drawn mainly from primary sources, including writings of politicians, activists, and theorists. Topics include the relationship between religion and politics, rights, federalism, national identity, republicanism versus liberalism, the relationship of subordinated groups to mainstream political discourse, and the role of ideas in politics. We will analyze the simultaneous radicalism and weakness of American liberalism, how the revolutionary ideas of freedom and equality run up against persistent patterns of inequality. Graduate students are expected to pursue the subject in greater depth through suggested reading and individual research.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Song, Sarah
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Book 2, Teenage Rebellion. Chapter 5, Lesson 3: Music and Political Movements
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In this lesson, students will explore the emergence of Sixties Soul music within the context of the Civil Rights movement of the early 1960s. Using Curtis Mayfield and the Impressions' iconic "People Get Ready" as a starting point, students will examine the connection between musical and political voices, and the ways in which popular song helped express the values of the movement and served as a galvanizing force for those involved.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
09/03/2019
Book 3, Transformation. Chapter 6, Lesson 2: The Music of the Civil Rights Movement
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In this lesson, students will examine the history and popularity of "We Shall Overcome" and investigate six additional songs from different musical genres that reveal the impact of the Civil Rights movement. These are: Billie Holiday's "Strange Fruit," a poignant Blues song depicting the horrors of lynching; Bob Dylan's "Oxford Town," a Folk song about protests after the integration of the University of Mississippi; John Coltrane's "Alabama," an instrumental Jazz recording made in response to the September 1963 church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama, that killed four African-American girls; Nina Simone's "Mississippi Goddam," a response to the same church bombing as well as the murder of civil rights activist Medgar Evers in Mississippi; Sam Cooke's "A Change is Gonna Come," a Soul song written after Cooke's arrest for attempting to check in to a whites-only motel in Shreveport, Louisiana; and Odetta's "Oh Freedom," a spiritual that Odetta performed at the 1963 March on Washington.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachRock
Date Added:
09/03/2019
The Boycott, Then and Now
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

The boycott is one of the most powerful, time-tested tactics that social movements have at their disposal. History offers many examples of people joining together to exercise their power as consumers in support of movements for social justice, civil rights, and workers' rights. By calling for people to not spend their money on a target good or service, boycotts can aid these movements by drawing on a wider base of supporters who would otherwise be unable to participate.

This lesson examines the historical development of the boycott as a tactic - with examples of its use by both progressives and conservatives - and looks at some recent boycotts that are related to hot-button political issues.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Mark Engler
Date Added:
06/28/2012
Civic Engagement
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There will always be issues that we disagree with and would like to see changed, but we tend to minimize our role in society. How many times have you thought to yourself, “I’m only one person”? This seminar will explain the important role you play in government. You might not feel like you play an important role, but you do! The “dem” in “democracy” comes from the Greek word demos, meaning “people.” There are many ways that you can be actively engaged in your local, state, and federal government. In this seminar, you will learn about the rights and responsibilities you have as an American citizen and what you can do to help on a small and large scale.StandardsCC.8.6.9.-10.C--Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.5.2.9.C--Examine political leadership and public service in a republican form of government.5.2.9.D--Analyze citizens’ role in the political process toward the attainment of goals for individual and public good.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
01/02/2018
Conversations with History: Activism, Anarchism, and Power, with Noam Chomsky
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On this edition of Conversations with History, UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler is joined by linguist and political activist Noam Chomsky to discuss activism, anarchism and the role the United States plays in the world today. (59 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. Berkeley
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
06/25/2006
Conversations with History: Environmental Justice, with Oronto Douglas
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In this edition, Nigerian attorney and environmental activist Oronto Douglas, talks about political activism and cultural identity in the context of globalization, the international oil economy, and the domestic politics of Nigeria. (55 min)

Subject:
Environmental Science
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. Berkeley
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
05/20/2007
Earth Day: An Interdisciplinary Unit
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Throughout this unit students will be able to gain an understanding of the importance of protecting the environment. This will be done through a series of mini projects that will focus on the various facets of the environment from a variety of lenses. This unit will change the focus from the personal level to a more global level.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Educational Technology
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Seraphine Lin
Date Added:
08/10/2018
Remix
Earth Da
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Throughout this unit students will be able to gain an understanding of the importance of protecting the environment. This will be done through a series of mini projects that will focus on the various facets of the environment from a variety of lenses. This unit will change the focus from the personal level to a more global level.

Subject:
Applied Science
Environmental Science
Environmental Studies
Educational Technology
Language Education (ESL)
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Sharon Meyer
Date Added:
08/08/2019
Fannie Lou Hamer and the Civil Rights Movement in Rural Mississippi
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This collection uses primary sources to explore Fannie Lou Hamer and the civil rights movement in rural Mississippi. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Jamie Lathan
Date Added:
04/11/2016
“Give Peace A Chance” Growing Opposition to the Vietnam War
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The 1960s and 70s comprised some of the most tumultuous eras in American history. The people were using their voices to express dissatisfaction with their government. This lesson provides a brief history of America’s involvement in Vietnam and surrounding areas. The focal point of the lesson is the resistance on the American homefront. In this lesson, you will discover first-hand how men were drafted for the Vietnam War and understand the draft’s role in the anti-war movement of the 1960s and 70s. You will analyze and interpret multiple primary source documents to consider anti-war sentiment in the United States.  StandardsCC.8.5.11-12.A: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.CC.8.6.11-12.A: Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Tracy Rains
Date Added:
01/02/2018