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  • 3D Printing
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3 D Prin
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Using a 3 D printer to model the printing of a mathematical object. Continueing on to calculate the volume of material used and total cost if the item based on this volume.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
xin dbai
Date Added:
08/08/2019
3D Printed STEM Racers : 7 Steps (with Pictures)
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Create 3D printed components for a vegetable/fruit STEM racer!

From the article:

"These 3D printed STEM race cars are the perfect project based learning tool to help teachers get kids excited about science, technology, engineering, math, and nutrition to boot! The racers I show you how to make in this instructable will provide an opportunity to turn almost anything (no kittens or other live things please) into a race car – allowing different sized and weighted objects to illustrate mechanical physics concepts like mass, friction, force, speed, distance, and gravity!"

Subject:
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Paige Russell
Date Added:
01/31/2020
3D Printing Operations & Introduction to Slicing Applications (Flex Mendel Open Source 3D Printer)
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These are step by step tutorial handouts for using a Flex Mendel or flexMendel open source 3D printer.  There are matching videos located on YouTube at:https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYZc2FR9EwWYF16SVbPzijWCRbMGpE38uandhttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYZc2FR9EwWY7tOr0E_ncfZDYmR3NyQfo

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
John Bordeau
Date Added:
10/18/2019
An Assistive Artistic Device
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Educational Use
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Students design and develop a useful assistive device for people challenged by fine motor skill development who cannot grasp and control objects. In the process of designing prototype devices, they learn about the engineering design process and how to use it to solve problems. After an introduction about the effects of disabilities and the importance of hand and finger dexterity, student pairs research, brainstorm, plan, budget, compare, select, prototype, test, evaluate and modify their design ideas to create devices that enable a student to hold and use a small paintbrush or crayon. The design challenge includes clearly identified criteria and constraints, to which teams rate their competing design solutions. Prototype testing includes independent evaluations by three classmates, after which students redesign to make improvements. To conclude, teams make one-slide presentations to the class to recap their design projects. This activity incorporates a 3D modeling and 3D printing component as students generate prototypes of their designs. However, if no 3D printer is available, the project can be modified to use traditional and/or simpler fabrication processes and basic materials.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Kristen Billiar
Terri Camesano
Thomas Oliva
Date Added:
02/07/2017
Bone Transplants—No Donors Necessary!
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Students investigate the bone structure of a turkey femur and then create their own prototype versions as if they are biomedical engineers designing bone transplants for a bird. The challenge is to mimic the size, shape, structure, mass and density of the real bone. Students begin by watching a TED Talk about printing a human kidney and reading a news article about 3D printing a replacement bone for an eagle. Then teams gather data—using calipers to get the exact turkey femur measurements—and determine the bone’s mass and density. They make to-scale sketches of the bone and then use modeling clay, plastic drinking straws and pipe cleaners to create 3D prototypes of the bone. Next, groups each cut and measure a turkey femur cross-section, which they draw in CAD software and then print on a 3D printer. Students reflect on the design/build process and the challenges encountered when making realistic bone replacements. A pre/post-quiz, worksheet and rubric are included. If no 3D printer, shorten the activity by just making the hand-generated replicate bones.

Subject:
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
Activities
Author:
David Breitbach
Deanna Grandalen
Date Added:
06/23/2017
City X Project
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The City X Project is an international educational workshop for 8-12 year-old students that teaches creative problem solving using 3D printing technologies and the design process. This 6-10 hour workshop is designed for 3rd-6th grade classrooms but can be adapted to fit a variety of environments. Read a full overview of the experience here: http://www.cityxproject.com/workshop/

Subject:
Manufacturing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
IDEAco
Author:
Brett Schilke
Libby Falck
Matthew Straub
Date Added:
04/04/2014
Design Air Racer Cars Using Tinkercad
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Educational Use
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Students use the engineering design process to assemble an electric racer vehicle. After using Tinkercad to design blades for their racers, students print their designs using a MakerBot printer. Once the students finish assembly and install their vehicle’s air blades, they race their vehicles to see which design travels the furthest distance in the least amount of time. A discussion at the end of the activity allows students to reflect on what they learned and to evaluation the engineering design process as a group.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
Activities
Author:
Beth Podoll
Kara Eken
Quenna Beston
Date Added:
04/29/2019
A Guide to Creating a 3-D Printed Book (for the Tech-Challenged ) : 32 Steps
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As a beginner to 3-D printing, I totally sympathize with trepidation you may have when approaching your first 3-D printing design. However, through the use of Tinkercad's unique and convenient digital Web design program and these instructions, you'll be able to quickly and easily replicate this miniature book design for 3-D printers. In just a few hours, you can hold your very own 3-D printed work.

To begin, you'll need:

1. A computer with Internet access

2. Access to a 3D Printer

Subject:
Computer Science
Graphic Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Wilson Erickson
Date Added:
01/31/2020
Help Bill! Bioprinting Skin, Muscle and Bone
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Educational Use
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Students operate mock 3D bioprinters in order to print tissue constructs of bone, muscle and skin for a fictitious trauma patient, Bill. The model bioprinters are made from ordinary materials— cardboard, dowels, wood, spools, duct tape, zip ties and glue (constructed by the teacher or the students)—and use squeeze bags of icing to lay down tissue layers. Student groups apply what they learned about biological tissue composition and tissue engineering in the associated lesson to design and fabricate model replacement tissues. They tangibly learn about the technical aspects and challenges of 3D bioprinting technology, as well as great detail about the complex cellular composition of tissues. At activity end, teams present their prototype designs to the class.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Biology
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
Activities
Author:
A. L. Peirce Starling
Angela Sickels
Hunter Sheldon
Nicholas Asby
Ryan Tasker-Benson
Shayn M. Peirce
Timothy Allen
Date Added:
06/20/2017
Intraocular Pressure Sensor Design Challenge
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Educational Use
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Acting as if they are biomedical engineers, students design and print 3D prototypes of pressure sensors that measure the pressure of the eyes of people diagnosed with glaucoma. After completing the tasks within the associated lesson, students conduct research on pressure gauges, apply their understanding of radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology and its components, iterate their designs to make improvements, and use 3D software to design and print 3D prototypes. After successful 3D printing, teams present their models to their peers. If a 3D printer is not available, use alternate fabrication materials such as modeling clay, or end the activity once the designs are complete.

Subject:
Engineering
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Janelle Orange
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Intro to 3D Bioprinting: Design, Applications and Limitations
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Educational Use
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Students learn about the current applications and limitations of 3D bioprinting, as well as its amazing future potential. This lesson, and its fun associated activity, provides a unique way to review and explore concepts such as differing cell functions, multicellular organism complexity, and engineering design steps. As introduced through a PowerPoint® presentation, students learn about three different types of bioprinters, with a focus on the extrusion model. Then they learn the basics of tissue engineering and the steps to design printed tissues. This background information prepares students to conduct the associated activity in which they use mock-3D bioprinters composed of a desktop setup that uses bags of icing to “bioprint” replacement skin, bone and muscle for a fictitious trauma patient, Bill. A pre/post-quiz is also provided.

Subject:
Engineering
Life Science
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
Lessons
Author:
A. L. Peirce Starling
Angela Sickels
Hunter Sheldon
Nicholas Asby
Ryan Tasker-Benson
Shayn M. Peirce
Timothy Allen
Date Added:
06/20/2017
Learn 3D Design Using Tinkercad
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This series of lessons will teach all of the key features in Tinkercad, a free, web-based 3D design platform. When you have finished the lessons you will have a comprehensive knowledge of how to design/draw in 3D. After that all you need is practice to improve your skills.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Computer Science
Graphic Arts
Visual Arts
Electronic Technology
Graphic Design
Educational Technology
Elementary Education
Geometry
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Tom Guellich
Date Added:
09/25/2018