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  • Smithsonian
Asian Pacific American Heritage Month 2021
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LOC has compiled a consortium of primary sources to work in the classroom. Ready-to-use lesson plans, student activities, collection guides and research aids to spread awareness and highlight the Asian Pacific American experience.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Library of Congress
National Archives
National Endowment for Humanities
National Gallery of Art
National Park Service
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
Smithsonian Institution
Date Added:
06/02/2021
Botany & Art and Their Roles in Conservation
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The lessons in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom introduce the work of botanists and botanical illustrators, specifically their race to make records of endangered plant species around the world. “Very little of the world’s flora has been fully studied,” says one Smithsonian botanist, “and time is running out.” In the first lesson, students gets to know six endangered plants. They examine illustrations, photographs, and dried specimens of the plants as they consider this question: If a scientist can take a picture of a plant, are there advantages in having an illustration? They go on to consider some of the big questions that botanists themselves must ask: Which of these species are most in need of conservation efforts? Are any of these plants more worth saving than others?In the second lesson, the students try their own hands at botanical illustration, following the methods of a Smithsonian staff illustrator. All that is required for the lesson are pencils, markers, tracing paper, and access to a photocopier.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Life Science
Botany
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Provider Set:
Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund
Author:
Smithsonian Institute
Date Added:
06/16/2014
COVID-19! How Can I Protect Myself and Others?
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COVID-19! How Can I Protect Myself and Others? will help you, and your community, understand the science of the virus that causes COVID-19 and other viruses like it. It will help you to figure out how this virus is impacting or affecting you or may impact you in the future. It will help you to understand the actions that you can take to keep yourself and your community safe.

In this project, you will discuss how people feel about the virus. You will investigate the science of this virus. You will explore public health measures, which are things that are happening in your community or may happen soon to keep COVID-19 from spreading. You will take action to support health in your community.

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
InterAcademy Partnership
Smithsonian Science Education Center
Date Added:
04/30/2021
Changes Ahoof: Could Climate Change Affect Arctic Caribou?
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Students run a simplified computer model to explore how climate conditions can affect caribou, the most abundant grazing animal in the Arctic.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
CLEAN: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network
Provider Set:
CLEAN: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network
Author:
Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
06/19/2012
Contemporary Art Conservation at Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Latex, chocolate, soap, and video game software are just a few of the non-traditional materials that have inspired contemporary artists. While they embrace the modern, synthetic and technologically advanced world in which we live, some of materials present significant conservation problems for museum conservators. Gwynne Ryan, a conservator at the Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden discusses the challenges museums face with this issue: Should we keep art locked away to make it last? Or let it be experienced as it was intended while accelerating its natural degradation? For more information about the Hirshhorn's conservation program, visit: http://hirshhorn.si.edu/educate/page.asp?key=205&subkey=75.

Subject:
Art History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smithsonian Institute
Author:
Smithsonian Institute
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Eyewitness Documentary of Changes in the Arctic's Climate
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This video documents the scope of changes in the Arctic, focusing on the impacts of warming and climate change on the indigenous Inuit population.

Subject:
Physical Science
Provider:
CLEAN: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network
Provider Set:
CLEAN: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network
Author:
Smithsonian Institution
Date Added:
08/17/2018
Food! How Do We Ensure Good Nutrition for All?
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ood! is a freely available community research guide developed by the Smithsonian Science Education Center (SSEC) in partnership with the InterAcademy Partnership as part of the Smithsonian Science for Global Goals project. These Smithsonian Science for Global Goals community research guides use the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a framework to focus on sustainable actions that are defined and implemented by students.

Food! is a module broken up into seven parts. Each part contains a series of tasks to complete. Each task contains additional resources to support that task. We have provided a suggested order for the parts and tasks. However, the structure of the guide hopefully allows you to customize your learning experience by selecting which parts, tasks, and resources you would like to utilize and in what order you would like to complete them.

Subject:
Applied Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Nutrition
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
InterAcademy Partnership
Smithsonian Science Education Center
Date Added:
04/30/2021
A Fossil Thermometer
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In this activity, students calculate temperatures during a time in the geologic record when rapid warming occurred using a well known method called 'leaf-margin analysis.' Students determine the percentage of the species that have leaves with smooth edges, as opposed to toothed, or jagged, edges. Facsimiles of fossil leaves from two collection sites are examined, categorized, and the data is plugged into an equation to provide an estimate of paleotemperature for two sites in the Bighorn Basin. It also introduces students to a Smithsonian scientist who worked on the excavation sites and did the analysis.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
CLEAN: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network
Provider Set:
CLEAN: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network
Author:
Smithsonian Institute
Smithsonian Institution
Date Added:
09/24/2018
Mosquito! How Can We Ensure Health For All From Mosquito-borne Diseases?
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Mosquito! is a freely available community research guide developed by the Smithsonian Science Education Center (SSEC) in partnership with the InterAcademy Partnership as part of the Smithsonian Science for Global Goals project. These Smithsonian Science for Global Goals community research guides use the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as a framework to focus on sustainable actions that are defined and implemented by students.

Mosquito! is a module broken up into seven parts. Each part contains a series of tasks to complete. Each task contains additional resources to support that task. We have provided a suggested order for the parts and tasks. However, the structure of the guide hopefully allows you to customize your learning experience by selecting which parts, tasks, and resources you would like to utilize and in what order you would like to complete them.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
InterAcademy Partnership
Smithsonian Science Education Center
Date Added:
04/30/2021
Native Knowledge 360° - Interactive Teaching Resources
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Native Knowledge 360° (NK360°) provides educators and students with new perspectives on Native American history and cultures. Most Americans have only been exposed to part of the story, as told from a single perspective through the lenses of popular media and textbooks. NK360° provides educational materials, virtual student programs, and teacher training that incorporate Native narratives, more comprehensive histories, and accurate information to enlighten and inform teaching and learning about Native America. NK360° challenges common assumptions about Native peoples and offers a view that includes not only the past but also the vibrancy of Native peoples and cultures today.

Subject:
History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Author:
Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian
Date Added:
02/01/2022
Resources: Data Management using National Ecological Observatory Network's (NEON) Small Mammal Data with Accompanying Lesson on Mark Recapture Analysis
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This version of this teaching module was published in Teaching Issues and Experiments in Ecology:

Jim McNeil and Megan A. Jones. April 2018, posting date. Data Management using National Ecological Observatory Network’s (NEON) Small Mammal Data with Accompanying Lesson on Mark Recapture Analysis. Teaching Issues and Experiments in Ecology, Vol. 13: Practice #9 [online]. http://tiee.esa.org/vol/v13/issues/data_sets/mcneil/abstract.html

*** *** ***

Undergraduate STEM students are graduating into professions that require them to manage and work with data at many points of a data management life cycle. Within ecology, students are presented not only with many opportunities to collect data themselves, but increasingly to access and use public data collected by others. This activity introduces the basic concept of data management from the field through to data analysis. The accompanying presentation materials mention the importance of considering long-term data storage and data analysis using public data.

This data set is a subset of small mammal trapping data from the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). The accompanying lesson introduces students to proper data management practices including how data moves from collection to analysis. Students perform basic spreadsheet tasks to complete a Lincoln-Peterson mark-recapture calculation to estimate population size for a species of small mammal. Pairs of students will work on different sections of the datasets allowing for comparison between seasons or, if instructors download additional data, between sites and years. Data from six months at NEON’s Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) field site are included in the materials download. Data from other years or locations can be downloaded directly from the NEON data portal to tailor the activity to a specific location or ecological topic.

In this activity, students will:

- discuss data management practices with the faculty. Presentation slides are provided to guide this discussion.
- view field collection data sheets to understand how organized data sheets can be constructed.
- design a spreadsheet data table for transcription of field collected data using good data management practices.
- view NEON small mammal trapping data to a) see a standardized spreadsheet data table and b) see what data are collected during NEON small mammal trapping.
- use Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets to conduct a simple Lincoln-Peterson Mark-Recapture analysis to estimate plot level species population abundance.

Please note that this lesson was developed while the NEON project was still in construction. There may be future changes to the format of collected and downloaded data. If using data directly from the NEON Data Portal instead of using the data sets accompanying this lesson, we recommend testing out the data each year prior to implementing this lesson in the classroom.

This module was originally taught starting with a field component where students accompanied NEON technicians during the small mammal trapping. As this is not a possibility for most courses, the initial part of the lesson has been modified to include optional videos that instructors can use to show how small mammal trapping is conducted. Instructors are also encouraged to bring small mammal traps and small mammal specimens into the classroom where available.

The Data Sets

The National Ecological Observatory Network is a program sponsored by the National Science Foundation and operated under cooperative agreement by Battelle Memorial Institute. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation through the NEON Program.

The following datasets are posted for educational purposes only. Data for research purposes should be obtained directly from the National Ecological Observatory Network (www.neonscience.org).

Data Citation: National Ecological Observatory Network. 2017. Data Product: NEON.DP1.10072.001. Provisional data downloaded from http://data.neonscience.org. Battelle, Boulder, CO, USA

Notes
Version 2.1: Includes correct Lincoln-Peterson Index formula in PPT, faculty, and student notes.

Version 2.0: This version of the teaching module was published in Teaching Issues and Experiments in Ecology. McNeil and Jones 2018. This version reflects updates based on comments from reviewers.

Version 1.0: This version of the teaching module was prepared as part of the 2017 DIG FMN. It was submitted for publication as part of the DIG Special Issue of TIEE.

Cite this work
Researchers should cite this work as follows:

Jim McNeil, Megan A. Jones (2018). Data Management using National Ecological Observatory Network's (NEON) Small Mammal Data with Accompanying Lesson on Mark Recapture Analysis. NEON - National Ecological Observatory Network, (Version 2.1). QUBES Educational Resources. doi:10.25334/Q4M121

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Primary Source
Author:
George Mason University Smithsonian-mason School Of Conservation
Jim Mcneil
Megan A
National Ecological Observatory Network
Date Added:
12/21/2021
Smithsonian Open Access
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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The following overview is from the Smithsonian Open Access web site:
Welcome to Smithsonian Open Access, where you can download, share, and reuse millions of the Smithsonian’s images—right now, without asking. With new platforms and tools, you have easier access to more than 3 million 2D and 3D digital items from our collections—with many more to come. This includes images and data from across the Smithsonian’s 19 museums, nine research centers, libraries, archives, and the National Zoo.
...We have released these images and data into the public domain as Creative Commons Zero (CC0), meaning you can use, transform, and share our open access assets without asking permission from the Smithsonian.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Art History
World Cultures
History
U.S. History
World History
Life Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Data Set
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Primary Source
Author:
Smithsonian
Date Added:
06/03/2021
Vaccines! How can we use science to help our community make decisions about vaccines?
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Vaccines! is a freely available community research guide developed by the Smithsonian Science Education Center (SSEC) in partnership with the InterAcademy Partnership as part of the Smithsonian Science for Global Goals project. The Vaccines! guide helps young people learn more about the concerns of their community in order to communicate accurate, helpful, and trusted information about vaccines.

Vaccines! features 8 tasks that incorporate investigations and hands-on science to help students discover, understand, and take action. Students learn about the science of vaccines throughout history; understand the science of how vaccines work; explore how vaccines are developed; examine issues of equity, access, and misinformation; and develop an action plan for addressing vaccines concerns in their communities.

Subject:
Applied Science
Life Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
InterAcademy Partnership
Smithsonian Science Education Center
Date Added:
04/30/2021