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The Case of the Stolen Painting: A Forensic Mystery
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This video will help students, particularly those not in AP-level classes, have a practical application for knowing about the major divisions between plants, particularly about the details of plant anatomy and reproduction. Students will be able to :Identify the major evolutionary innovations that separate plant divisions, and classify plants as belonging to one of those divisions based on phenotypic differences in plants. Classify plants by their pollen dispersal methods using pollen dispersal mapping, and justify the location of a _„ƒcrime scene_„Ž using map analysis. Analyze and present their analysis of banding patterns from DNA fingerprinting done using plants in a forensic context.

Subject:
Botany
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
MIT BLOSSOMS
Sydney Bergman
Date Added:
10/11/2012
Explore MIT App Inventor
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CC BY-SA
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MIT App Inventor is an intuitive, visual programming environment that allows everyone – even children – to build fully functional apps for smartphones and tablets.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
MIT
Date Added:
09/10/2019
The Flaws of Averages
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This learning video presents an introduction to the Flaws of Averages using three exciting examples: the ''crossing of the river'' example, the ''cookie'' example, and the ''dance class'' example. Averages are often worthwhile representations of a set of data by a single descriptive number. The objective of this module, however, is to simply point out a few pitfalls that could arise if one is not attentive to details when calculating and interpreting averages. The essential prerequisite knowledge for this video lesson is the ability to calculate an average from a set of numbers. During this video lesson, students will learn about three flaws of averages: (1) The average is not always a good description of the actual situation, (2) The function of the average is not always the same as the average of the function, and (3) The average depends on your perspective. To convey these concepts, the students are presented with the three real world examples mentioned above.

Subject:
Education
Mathematics
Numbers and Operations
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Daniel Livengood
MIT BLOSSOMS
Rhonda Jordan
Date Added:
06/02/2012
Homeostasis
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Ever wondered why your temperature stays at 98.6 degrees? Learn about homeostasis and how your body maintains a stable temperature. Created by MIT+K12.

Subject:
Anatomy/Physiology
Biology
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Khan Academy
Author:
MIT+K12
Date Added:
10/23/2012
Imagine, Program, Share
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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Helps young people learn to think creatively, reason systematically, and work collaboratively — essential skills for life in the 21st century.

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
MIT Media Lab
Date Added:
11/07/2017
Is Bigger Better? A Look at a Selection Bias that Is All Around Us
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This learning video addresses a particular problem of selection bias, a statistical bias in which there is an error in choosing the individuals or groups to make broader inferences. Rather than delve into this broad topic via formal statistics, we investigate how it may appear in our everyday lives, sometimes distorting our perceptions of people, places and events, unless we are careful. When people are picked at random from two groups of different sizes, most of those selected usually come from the bigger group. That means we will hear more about the experience of the bigger group than that of the smaller one. This isn't always a bad thing, but it isn't always a good thing either. Because big groups ''speak louder,'' we have to be careful when we write mathematical formulas about what happened in the two groups. We think about this issue in this video, with examples that involve theaters, buses, and lemons. The prerequisite for this video lesson is a familiarity with algebra. It will take about one hour to complete, and the only materials needed are a blackboard and chalk.

Subject:
Education
Mathematics
Sociology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Anna Teytelman
Arnold Barnett
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
06/02/2012
MIT's Greenhouse Gas Simulator
Read the Fine Print
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One of a suite of online climate interactive simulations, this Greenhouse Gas Simulator uses the bathtub model to demonstrate how atmospheric concentrations of CO2 will continue to rise unless they are lowered to match the amount of CO2 that can be removed through natural processes.

Subject:
Physical Science
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
CLEAN: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network
Provider Set:
CLEAN: Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network
Author:
John Sherman
MIT
Date Added:
09/24/2018
The Power of Exponentials, Big and Small
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CC BY-NC-SA
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In this lesson, through various examples and activities, exponential growth and polynomial growth are compared to develop an insight about how quickly the number can grow or decay in exponentials. A basic knowledge of scientific notation, plotting graphs and finding intersection of two functions is assumed.

Subject:
Education
Functions
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
07/12/2014
Using Geometry to Design Simple Machines
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This video is meant to be a fun, hands-on session that gets students to think hard about how machines work. It teaches them the connection between the geometry that they study and the kinematics that engineers use -- explaining that kinematics is simply geometry in motion. In this lesson, geometry will be used in a way that students are not used to. Materials necessary for the hands-on activities include two options: pegboard, nails/screws and a small saw; or colored construction paper, thumbtacks and scissors. Some in-class activities for the breaks between the video segments include: exploring the role of geometry in a slider-crank mechanism; determining at which point to locate a joint or bearing in a mechanism; recognizing useful mechanisms in the students' communities that employ the same guided motion they have been studying.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Mathematics
Geometry
Physics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT Blossoms
Author:
Daniel D. Frey
MIT BLOSSOMS
Date Added:
06/02/2012