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  • George C. Banks
Data availability, reusability, and analytic reproducibility: evaluating the impact of a mandatory open data policy at the journal Cognition
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Access to data is a critical feature of an efficient, progressive and ultimately self-correcting scientific ecosystem. But the extent to which in-principle benefits of data sharing are realized in practice is unclear. Crucially, it is largely unknown whether published findings can be reproduced by repeating reported analyses upon shared data (‘analytic reproducibility’). To investigate this, we conducted an observational evaluation of a mandatory open data policy introduced at the journal Cognition. Interrupted time-series analyses indicated a substantial post-policy increase in data available statements (104/417, 25% pre-policy to 136/174, 78% post-policy), although not all data appeared reusable (23/104, 22% pre-policy to 85/136, 62%, post-policy). For 35 of the articles determined to have reusable data, we attempted to reproduce 1324 target values. Ultimately, 64 values could not be reproduced within a 10% margin of error. For 22 articles all target values were reproduced, but 11 of these required author assistance. For 13 articles at least one value could not be reproduced despite author assistance. Importantly, there were no clear indications that original conclusions were seriously impacted. Mandatory open data policies can increase the frequency and quality of data sharing. However, suboptimal data curation, unclear analysis specification and reporting errors can impede analytic reproducibility, undermining the utility of data sharing and the credibility of scientific findings.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Royal Society Open Science
Author:
Alicia Hofelich Mohr
Bria Long
Elizabeth Clayton
Erica J. Yoon
George C. Banks
Gustav Nilsonne
Kyle MacDonald
Mallory C. Kidwell
Maya B. Mathur
Michael C. Frank
Michael Henry Tessler
Richie L. Lenne
Sara Altman
Tom E. Hardwicke
Date Added:
08/07/2020
A consensus-based transparency checklist
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CC BY
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We present a consensus-based checklist to improve and document the transparency of research reports in social and behavioural research. An accompanying online application allows users to complete the form and generate a report that they can submit with their manuscript or post to a public repository.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Nature Human Behaviour
Author:
Agneta Fisher
Alexandra M. Freund
Alexandra Sarafoglou
Alice S. Carter
Andrew A. Bennett
Andrew Gelman
Balazs Aczel
Barnabas Szaszi
Benjamin R. Newell
Brendan Nyhan
Candice C. Morey
Charles Clifton
Christopher Beevers
Christopher D. Chambers
Christopher Sullivan
Cristina Cacciari
Daniel Benjamin
Daniel J. Simons
David R. Shanks
Debra Lieberman
Derek Isaacowitz
Dolores Albarracin
Don P. Green
D. Stephen Lindsay
Eric-Jan Wagenmakers
Eric Johnson
Eveline A. Crone
Fernando Hoces de la Guardia
Fiammetta Cosci
George C. Banks
Gordon D. Logan
Hal R. Arkes
Harold Pashler
Janet Kolodner
Jarret Crawford
Jeffrey Pollack
Jelte M. Wicherts
John Antonakis
John Curtin
John P. Ioannidis
Joseph Cesario
Kai Jonas
Lea Moersdorf
Lisa L. Harlow
Marcus Munafò
Mark Fichman
M. Gareth Gaskell
Mike Cortese
Mitja D. Back
Morton A. Gernsbacher
Nelson Cowan
Nicole D. Anderson
Pasco Fearon
Randall Engle
Robert L. Greene
Roger Giner-Sorolla
Ronán M. Conroy
Scott O. Lilienfeld
Simine Vazire
Simon Farrell
Šimon Kucharský
Stavroula Kousta
Ty W. Boyer
Wendy B. Mendes
Wiebke Bleidorn
Willem Frankenhuis
Zoltan Kekecs
Date Added:
08/07/2020