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  • Emily S. Sena
Attitudes towards animal study registries and their characteristics: An online survey of three cohorts of animal researchers
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Objectives Prospective registration of animal studies has been suggested as a new measure to increase value and reduce waste in biomedical research. We sought to further explore and quantify animal researchers’ attitudes and preferences regarding animal study registries (ASRs). Design Cross-sectional online survey. Setting and participants We conducted a survey with three different samples representing animal researchers: i) corresponding authors from journals with high Eigenfactor, ii) a random Pubmed sample and iii) members of the CAMARADES network. Main outcome measures Perceived level of importance of different aspects of publication bias, the effect of ASRs on different aspects of research as well as the importance of different research types for being registered. Results The survey yielded responses from 413 animal researchers (response rate 7%). The respondents indicated, that some aspects of ASRs can increase administrative burden but could be outweighed by other aspects decreasing this burden. Animal researchers found it more important to register studies that involved animal species with higher levels of cognitive capabilities. The time frame for making registry entries publicly available revealed a strong heterogeneity among respondents, with the largest proportion voting for “access only after consent by the principal investigator” and the second largest proportion voting for “access immediately after registration”. Conclusions The fact that the more senior and experienced animal researchers participating in this survey clearly indicated the practical importance of publication bias and the importance of ASRs underscores the problem awareness across animal researchers and the willingness to actively engage in study registration if effective safeguards for the potential weaknesses of ASRs are put into place. To overcome the first-mover dilemma international consensus statements on how to deal with prospective registration of animal studies might be necessary for all relevant stakeholder groups including animal researchers, academic institutions, private companies, funders, regulatory agencies, and journals.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Biology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
PLOS ONE
Author:
André Bleich
Daniel Strech
Emily S. Sena
Hans Laser
René Tolba
Susanne Wieschowski
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Risk of Bias in Reports of In Vivo Research: A Focus for Improvement
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CC BY
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The reliability of experimental findings depends on the rigour of experimental design. Here we show limited reporting of measures to reduce the risk of bias in a random sample of life sciences publications, significantly lower reporting of randomisation in work published in journals of high impact, and very limited reporting of measures to reduce the risk of bias in publications from leading United Kingdom institutions. Ascertainment of differences between institutions might serve both as a measure of research quality and as a tool for institutional efforts to improve research quality.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
PLOS Biology
Author:
Aaron Lawson McLean
Aikaterini Kyriakopoulou
Andrew Thomson
Aparna Potluru
Arno de Wilde
Cristina Nunes-Fonseca
David W. Howells
Emily S. Sena
Gillian L. Currie
Hanna Vesterinen
Julija Baginskitae
Kieren Egan
Leonid Churilov
Malcolm R. Macleod
Nicki Sherratt
Rachel Hemblade
Stylianos Serghiou
Theo Hirst
Zsanett Bahor
Date Added:
08/07/2020