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  • David Baker
Library Carpentry: Introduction to Git
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Library Carpentry lesson: An introduction to Git. What We Will Try to Do Begin to understand and use Git/GitHub. You will not be an expert by the end of the class. You will probably not even feel very comfortable using Git. This is okay. We want to make a start but, as with any skill, using Git takes practice. Be Excellent to Each Other If you spot someone in the class who is struggling with something and you think you know how to help, please give them a hand. Try not to do the task for them: instead explain the steps they need to take and what these steps will achieve. Be Patient With The Instructor and Yourself This is a big group, with different levels of knowledge, different computer systems. This isn’t your instructor’s full-time job (though if someone wants to pay them to play with computers all day they’d probably accept). They will do their best to make this session useful. This is your session. If you feel we are going too fast, then please put up a pink sticky. We can decide as a group what to cover.

Subject:
Applied Science
Computer Science
Information Science
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
The Carpentries
Author:
222064h
abracarambar
ajtag
Alexander Gary Zimmerman
Alexander Mendes
Alex Mendes
Amiya Maji
Amy Olex
Andrew Lonsdale
Annika Rockenberger
Begüm D. Topçuoğlu
Belinda Weaver
Benjamin Bolker
Bill McMillin
Brian Moore
butterflyskip
Casey Youngflesh
Christopher Erdmann
Christoph Junghans
cmjt
Dan Michael O. Heggø
David Jennings
DSTraining
Erin Alison Becker
Evan Williamson
Garrett Bachant
Grant Sayer
hdinkel
Ian Lee
Jake Lever
Jamene Brooks-Kieffer
James Baker
James E McClure
James O'Donnell
James Tocknell
Janoš Vidali
Jeffrey Oliver
Jeremy Teitelbaum
Jeyashree Krishnan
João Rodrigues
Joe Atzberger
Jonah Duckles
Jonathan Cooper
jonestoddcm
Katherine Koziar
Katrin Leinweber
Kunal Marwaha
Kurt Glaesemann
Lauren Ko
L.C. Karssen
Lex Nederbragt
Madicken Munk
Maneesha Sane
Marie-Helene Burle
Mark Woodbridge
Martino Sorbaro
Matt Critchlow
Matteo Ceschia
Matthew Bourque
Matthew Hartley
Maxim Belkin
Megan Potterbusch
Michael Torpey
Michael Zingale
Mingsheng Zhang
Nicola Soranzo
Nima Hejazi
Nora McGregor
Oscar Arbeláez
Peace Ossom Williamson
pllim
Raniere Silva
Rayna Harris
Rémi Emonet
Rene Gassmoeller
Richard Barnes
Rich McCue
Ruud Steltenpool
Ryan Wick
Samniqueka Halsey
Samuel Lelièvre
Sarah Stevens
Saskia Hiltemann
Schlauch, Tobias
Scott Bailey
Shari Laster
Simon Waldman
Stefan Siegert
Thea Atwood
Thomas Morrell
Tim Dennis
Tommy Keswick
Tracy Teal
Trevor Keller
TrevorLeeCline
Tyler Crawford Kelly
Tyler Reddy
Umihiko Hoshijima
Veronica Ikeshoji-Orlati
Wes Harrell
William Sacks
Will Usher
Wolmar Nyberg Åkerström
Yuri
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Library Carpentry: SQL
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Library Carpentry, an introduction to SQL for Librarians This Library Carpentry lesson introduces librarians to relational database management system using SQLite. At the conclusion of the lesson you will: understand what SQLite does; use SQLite to summarise and link data.

Subject:
Applied Science
Information Science
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
The Carpentries
Author:
222064h
Anna-Maria Sichani
Belinda Weaver
Christopher Erdmann
Dan Michael Heggø
David Kane
Elaine Wong
Emanuele Lanzani
Fernando Rios
Jamene Brooks-Kieffer
James Baker
Janice Chan
Jeffrey Oliver
Katrin Leinweber
Kunal Marwaha
mdschleu
orobecca
Reid Otsuji
Ruud Steltenpool
thegsi
Tim Dennis
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Library Carpentry: The UNIX Shell
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Library Carpentry lesson to learn how to use the Shell. This Library Carpentry lesson introduces librarians to the Unix Shell. At the conclusion of the lesson you will: understand the basics of the Unix shell; understand why and how to use the command line; use shell commands to work with directories and files; use shell commands to find and manipulate data.

Subject:
Applied Science
Information Science
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
The Carpentries
Author:
Adam Huffman
Alexander Konovalov
Alexander Morley
Alex Kassil
Alex Mendes
Ana Costa Conrado
Andrew Reid
Andrew T. T. McRae
Ariel Rokem
Ashwin Srinath
Bagus Tris Atmaja
Belinda Weaver
Benjamin Bolker
Benjamin Gabriel
BertrandCaron
Brian Ballsun-Stanton
Christopher Erdmann
Christopher Mentzel
colinmorris
Colin Sauze
csqrs
Dan Michael Heggø
Dave Bridges
David McKain
Dmytro Lituiev
earkpr
ekaterinailin
Elena Denisenko
Eric Jankowski
Erin Alison Becker
Evan Williamson
Farah Shamma
Gabriel Devenyi
Gerard Capes
Giuseppe Profiti
Halle Burns
Hannah Burkhardt
hugolio
Ian Lessing
Ian van der Linde
Jake Cowper Szamosi
James Baker
James Guelfi
Jarno Rantaharju
Jarosław Bryk
Jason Macklin
Jeffrey Oliver
jenniferleeucalgary
John Pellman
Jonah Duckles
Jonny Williams
Katrin Leinweber
Kevin M. Buckley
Kunal Marwaha
Laurence
Marc Gouw
Marie-Helene Burle
Marisa Lim
Martha Robinson
Martin Feller
Megan Fritz
Michael Lascarides
Michael Zingale
Michele Hayslett
Mike Henry
Morgan Oneka
Murray Hoggett
Nicolas Barral
Nicola Soranzo
Noah D Brenowitz
Owen Kaluza
Patrick McCann
Peter Hoyt
Rafi Ullah
Raniere Silva
Rémi Emonet
reshama shaikh
Ruud Steltenpool
sjnair
Stéphane Guillou
Stephan Schmeing
Stephen Jones
Stephen Leak
Susan J Miller
Thomas Mellan
Tim Dennis
Tom Dowrick
Travis Lilleberg
Victor Koppejan
Vikram Chhatre
Yee Mey
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Two Years Later: Journals Are Not Yet Enforcing the ARRIVE Guidelines on Reporting Standards for Pre-Clinical Animal Studies
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

A study by David Baker and colleagues reveals poor quality of reporting in pre-clinical animal research and a failure of journals to implement the ARRIVE guidelines. There is growing concern that poor experimental design and lack of transparent reporting contribute to the frequent failure of pre-clinical animal studies to translate into treatments for human disease. In 2010, the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) guidelines were introduced to help improve reporting standards. They were published in PLOS Biology and endorsed by funding agencies and publishers and their journals, including PLOS, Nature research journals, and other top-tier journals. Yet our analysis of papers published in PLOS and Nature journals indicates that there has been very little improvement in reporting standards since then. This suggests that authors, referees, and editors generally are ignoring guidelines, and the editorial endorsement is yet to be effectively implemented.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Life Science
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
PLOS Biology
Author:
Ana Sottomayor
David Baker
Katie Lidster
Sandra Amor
Date Added:
08/07/2020