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  • Bailey Jones
Bouncing Balls
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Students examine how different balls react when colliding with different surfaces, giving plenty of opportunity for them to see the difference between elastic and inelastic collisions, learn how to calculate momentum, and understand the principle of conservation of momentum.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Bailey Jones
Chris Yakacki
Denise Carlson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Matt Lundberg
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Bouncing Balls (for High School)
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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In this activity, students examine how different balls react when colliding with different surfaces. Also, they will have plenty of opportunity to learn how to calculate momentum and understand the principle of conservation of momentum.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Bailey Jones
Ben Sprague
Chris Yakacki
Denise Carlson
Janet Yowell
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Matt Lundberg
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Collisions and Momentum: Bouncing Balls
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Educational Use
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As a continuation of the theme of potential and kinetic energy, this lesson introduces the concepts of momentum, elastic and inelastic collisions. Many sports and games, such as baseball and ping-pong, illustrate the ideas of momentum and collisions. Students explore these concepts by bouncing assorted balls on different surfaces and calculating the momentum for each ball.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Bailey Jones
Chris Yakacki
Denise Carlson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Matt Lundberg
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Kinetic and Potential Energy of Motion
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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In this lesson, students are introduced to both potential energy and kinetic energy as forms of mechanical energy. A hands-on activity demonstrates how potential energy can change into kinetic energy by swinging a pendulum, illustrating the concept of conservation of energy. Students calculate the potential energy of the pendulum and predict how fast it will travel knowing that the potential energy will convert into kinetic energy. They verify their predictions by measuring the speed of the pendulum.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Bailey Jones
Chris Yakacki
Denise Carlson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Matt Lundberg
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Power, Work and the Waterwheel
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Educational Use
Rating
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Waterwheels are devices that generate power and do work. Student teams construct waterwheels using two-liter plastic bottles, dowel rods and index cards, and calculate the power created and work done by them.

Subject:
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Bailey Jones
Chris Yakacki
Denise W. Carlson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Matt Lundberg
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Version Control with Git
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This lesson is part of the Software Carpentry workshops that teach how to use version control with Git. Wolfman and Dracula have been hired by Universal Missions (a space services spinoff from Euphoric State University) to investigate if it is possible to send their next planetary lander to Mars. They want to be able to work on the plans at the same time, but they have run into problems doing this in the past. If they take turns, each one will spend a lot of time waiting for the other to finish, but if they work on their own copies and email changes back and forth things will be lost, overwritten, or duplicated. A colleague suggests using version control to manage their work. Version control is better than mailing files back and forth: Nothing that is committed to version control is ever lost, unless you work really, really hard at it. Since all old versions of files are saved, it’s always possible to go back in time to see exactly who wrote what on a particular day, or what version of a program was used to generate a particular set of results. As we have this record of who made what changes when, we know who to ask if we have questions later on, and, if needed, revert to a previous version, much like the “undo” feature in an editor. When several people collaborate in the same project, it’s possible to accidentally overlook or overwrite someone’s changes. The version control system automatically notifies users whenever there’s a conflict between one person’s work and another’s. Teams are not the only ones to benefit from version control: lone researchers can benefit immensely. Keeping a record of what was changed, when, and why is extremely useful for all researchers if they ever need to come back to the project later on (e.g., a year later, when memory has faded). Version control is the lab notebook of the digital world: it’s what professionals use to keep track of what they’ve done and to collaborate with other people. Every large software development project relies on it, and most programmers use it for their small jobs as well. And it isn’t just for software: books, papers, small data sets, and anything that changes over time or needs to be shared can and should be stored in a version control system.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
The Carpentries
Author:
abracarambar
Alexander G. Zimmerman
Amiya Maji
Amy L Olex
Andrew Lonsdale
Annika Rockenberger
Begüm D. Topçuoğlu
Ben Bolker
Bill Sacks
Brian Moore
butterflyskip
Casey Youngflesh
Charlotte Moragh Jones-Todd
Christoph Junghans
David Jennings
Erin Alison Becker
François Michonneau
Garrett Bachant
Grant Sayer
Holger Dinkel
Ian Lee
Jake Lever
James E McClure
James Tocknell
Janoš Vidali
Jeremy Teitelbaum
Jeyashree Krishnan
Jimmy O'Donnell
João Rodrigues
Joe Atzberger
Jonah Duckles
Jonathan Cooper
jonestoddcm
Katherine Koziar
Katrin Leinweber
Kunal Marwaha
Kurt Glaesemann
Lauren Ko
L.C. Karssen
Lex Nederbragt
Madicken Munk
Maneesha Sane
Marie-Helene Burle
Mark Woodbridge
Martino Sorbaro
Matt Critchlow
Matteo Ceschia
Matthew Bourque
Matthew Hartley
Maxim Belkin
Megan Potterbusch
Michael Torpey
Michael Zingale
Mingsheng Zhang
Nicola Soranzo
Nima Hejazi
Oscar Arbeláez
Peace Ossom Williamson
Pey Lian Lim
Raniere Silva
Rayna Michelle Harris
Rémi Emonet
Rene Gassmoeller
Richard Barnes
Rich McCue
Ruud Steltenpool
Samniqueka Halsey
Samuel Lelièvre
Sarah Stevens
Saskia Hiltemann
Schlauch, Tobias
Scott Bailey
Simon Waldman
Stefan Siegert
Thomas Morrell
Tommy Keswick
Traci P
Tracy Teal
Trevor Keller
TrevorLeeCline
Tyler Crawford Kelly
Tyler Reddy
Umihiko Hoshijima
Veronica Ikeshoji-Orlati
Wes Harrell
Will Usher
Wolmar Nyberg Åkerström
Date Added:
03/20/2017
What a Drag!
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
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The purpose of this activity is to demonstrate how drag affects falling objects. Students will make a variety of shapes out of paper and see how size and shape affects the speed with which their paper shapes fall.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Bailey Jones
Chris Yakacki
Denise Carlson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Matt Lundberg
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Work and Power: Waterwheel
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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Investigating a waterwheel illustrates to students the physical properties of energy. They learn that the concept of work, force acting over a distance, differs from power, which is defined as force acting over a distance over some period of time. Students create a model waterwheel and use it to calculate the amount of power produced and work done.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Bailey Jones
Chris Yakacki
Denise W. Carlson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Matt Lundberg
Date Added:
09/18/2014