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  • Amy Beasley
Introduction to Literature: Poetry syllabus and reading list
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Catalog description: ENG 106 will present to the student a wide range of poetry from various time periods and cultures. Course work will involve students in the consideration of poetic technique and expression. Theme, structure, and style will be emphasized, as well as the elements of poetry. At the discretion of the Instructor, students may also be required to participate in creative writing assignments to gain insight into the nature of poetry.

Additional words from Amy: This course will be geared toward helping you learn ways of reading, enjoying, and appreciating poetry. To do this, we'll read a wide variety of poems from different cultures and times. Keeping in mind that poetry is a form of artistic expression, our ultimate goal will be to discover ways that poetry can guide our understanding of a culture, a time, and/or of human experience. In order to notice and discuss the effects that poems have on readers, you'll also work with the language used to describe techniques that poets use in their art.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Amy Beasley
Date Added:
03/06/2020
WR 122 open/free syllabus
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Course description:
WR 122 continues the focus of WR 121 in its review of rhetorical concepts and vocabulary, in the development of reading, thinking, and writing skills, along with metacognitive competencies understood through the lens of a rhetorical vocabulary. Specifically, students will identify, evaluate, and construct chains of reasoning, a process that includes an ability to distinguish assertion from evidence, recognize and evaluate assumptions, and select sources appropriate for a rhetorical task.
Students will employ a flexible, collaborative, and appropriate composing process, working in multiple genres, and utilizing at least two modalities. They will produce 3500-4500 words of revised, final draft copy or an appropriate multimodal analog for this amount of text. If the focus is primarily multimodal, students will produce at least one essay of a minimum of 1500 words, demonstrating competence in both research and academic argumentation.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Amy Beasley
Date Added:
03/14/2019