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  • CCSS.Math.Content.6.EE.C.9
Energy Skate Park
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
4.0 stars

Learn about conservation of energy with a skater dude! Build tracks, ramps and jumps for the skater and view the kinetic energy, potential energy and friction as he moves. You can also take the skater to different planets or even space!

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
University of Colorado Boulder
Provider Set:
PhET Interactive Simulations
Author:
Carl Wieman
Danielle Harlow
Kathy Perkins
Michael
Michael Dubson
Sam Reid
Trish Loeblein
Wendy Adams
Date Added:
10/03/2006
Math, Grade 6, Putting Math to Work, The Relationship Between Size & Price 2.0
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
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During this two-day lesson, students work with a partner to create and implement a problem-solving plan based on the mathematical concepts of rates, ratios, and proportionality. Students analyze the relationship between different-sized gummy bears to solve problems involving size and price.Key ConceptsThroughout this unit, students are encouraged to apply the mathematical concepts they have learned over the course of this year to new settings. Helping students develop and refine these problem solving skills:Creating a problem solving plan and implementing their plan systematicallyPersevering through challenging problems to find solutionsRecalling prior knowledge and applying that knowledge to new situationsMaking connections between previous learning and real-world problemsCommunicating their approaches with precision and articulating why their strategies and solutions are reasonableCreating efficacy and confidence in solving challenging problems in a real worldGoals and Learning ObjectivesCreate and implement a problem-solving plan.Organize and interpret data presented in a problem situation.Analyze the relationship between two variables.Use ratios.Write and solve proportions.Create rate tables to organize data and make predictionsUse multiple representations—including tables, graphs, and equations—to organize and communicate data.Articulate strategies, thought processes, and approaches to solving a problem and defend why the solution is reasonable.

Subject:
Ratios and Proportions
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Breaking the Mold
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Educational Use
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In this math activity, students conduct a strength test using modeling clay, creating their own stress vs. strain graphs, which they compare to typical steel and concrete graphs. They learn the difference between brittle and ductile materials and how understanding the strength of materials, especially steel and concrete, is important for engineers who design bridges and structures.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Chris Valenti
Denali Lander
Denise W. Carlson
Joe Friedrichsen
Jonathan S. Goode
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Natalie Mach
Date Added:
02/19/2009
Conduction, Convection and Radiation
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Educational Use
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With the help of simple, teacher-led demonstration activities, students learn the basic concepts of heat transfer by means of conduction, convection, and radiation. Students then apply these concepts as they work in teams to solve two problems. One problem requires that they maintain the warm temperature of one soda can filled with water at approximately body temperature, and the other problem is to cause an identical soda can of warm water to cool as much as possible during the same thirty-minute time interval. Students design their solutions using only common, everyday materials. They record the water temperatures in their two soda cans every five minutes, and prepare line graphs in order to visually compare their results to the temperature of an unaltered control can of water.

Subject:
Engineering
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Laws of Arithmetic
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
4.0 stars

This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to: Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving whole-number exponents, recognizing and applying the conventional order of operations; Write and evaluate numerical expressions from diagrammatic representations and be able to identify equivalent expressions; apply the distributive and commutative properties appropriately; and use the method for finding areas of compound rectangles.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Date Added:
04/26/2013
The Good, the Bad and the Electromagnet
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Educational Use
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Using plastic straws, wire, batteries and iron nails, student teams build and test two versions of electromagnets one with and one without an iron nail at its core. They test each magnet's ability pick up loose staples, which reveals the importance of an iron core to the magnet's strength. Students also learn about the prevalence and importance of electromagnets in their everyday lives.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Dayna Martinez
James Cooper Patricio Rocha
Mandek Richardson
Tapas K. Das
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Hi Ho, Hi Ho, It's to the Mine We Go
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Educational Use
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This activity simulates the extraction of limited, nonrenewable resources from a "mine," so students can experience first-hand how resource extraction becomes more difficult over time. Students gather data and graph their results to determine the peak in resource extraction. They learn about the limitations of nonrenewable resources, and how these resources are currently used.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Kristen Brown
Marissa H. Forbes
Date Added:
09/18/2014
How Fast Can a Carrot Rot?
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Educational Use
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Students conduct experiments to determine what environmental factors favor decomposition by soil microbes. They use chunks of carrots for the materials to be decomposed, and their experiments are carried out in plastic bags filled with dirt. Every few days students remove the carrots from the dirt and weigh them. Depending on the experimental conditions, after a few weeks most of the carrots have decomposed completely.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Math, Grade 6, Rate
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0.0 stars

Rate

Type of Unit: Concept

Prior Knowledge

Students should be able to:

Solve problems involving all four operations with rational numbers.
Understand quantity as a number used with a unit of measurement.
Solve problems involving quantities such as distances, intervals of time, liquid volumes, masses of objects, and money, and with the units of measurement for these quantities.
Understand that a ratio is a comparison of two quantities.
Write ratios for problem situations.
Make and interpret tables, graphs, and diagrams.
Write and solve equations to represent problem situations.

Lesson Flow

In this unit, students will explore the concept of rate in a variety of contexts: beats per minute, unit prices, fuel efficiency of a car, population density, speed, and conversion factors. Students will write and refine their own definition for rate and then use it to recognize rates in different situations. Students will learn that every rate is paired with an inverse rate that is a measure of the same relationship. Students will figure out the logic of how units are used with rates. Then students will represent quantitative relationships involving rates, using tables, graphs, double number lines, and formulas, and they will see how to create one such representation when given another.

Subject:
Mathematics
Algebra
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
Math, Grade 6, Putting Math to Work, The Relationship Between Size & Price
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

During this two-day lesson, students work with a partner to create and implement a problem-solving plan based on the mathematical concepts of rates, ratios, and proportionality. Students analyze the relationship between different-sized gummy bears to solve problems involving size and price.Key ConceptsThroughout this unit, students are encouraged to apply the mathematical concepts they have learned over the course of this year to new settings. Help students develop and refine these problem-solving skills:Creating a problem solving plan and implementing their plan systematicallyPersevering through challenging problems to find solutionsRecalling prior knowledge and applying that knowledge to new situationsMaking connections between previous learning and real-world problemsCommunicating their approaches with precision and articulating why their strategies and solutions are reasonableCreating efficacy and confidence in solving challenging problems in a real worldGoals and Learning ObjectivesCreate and implement a problem-solving plan.Organize and interpret data presented in a problem situation.Analyze the relationship between two variables.Use ratios.Write and solve proportions.Create rate tables to organize data and make predictions.Use multiple representations—including tables, graphs, and equations—to organize and communicate data.Articulate strategies, thought processes, and approaches to solving a problem, and defend why the solution is reasonable.

Subject:
Ratios and Proportions
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Buildings and Earthquakes
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Earthquakes happen when forces in the Earth cause violent shaking of the ground. Earthquakes can be very destructive to buildings and other man-made structures. Design and build various types of buildings, then test your buildings for earthquake resistance using a shake table and a force sensor that measures how hard a force pushes or pulls your building.

Subject:
Engineering
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture Notes
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Date Added:
05/21/2012
Describing Velocity
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Learn to connect position-time and velocity-time graphs. Explore velocity using an animated car icon connected to either a position-time or a velocity-time graph, or both. Then investigate other motion graphs.

Subject:
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium
Author:
Concord Consortium
Date Added:
04/25/2012
Math, Grade 6, Rate, Reviewing Quantitative Relationships
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students represent quantitative relationships involving rates using tables, graphs, double number lines, and formulas. Students will understand how to create one such representation when given another representation.Key ConceptsQuantitative relationships involving rates can be represented using tables, graphs, double number lines, and formulas. One such representation can be used to create another representation. Two rates can describe each situation: the rate and its inverse. For the water pump situation, there are two related formulas: a formula for finding the quantity of water pumped for any amount of time, and a formula for finding the amount of time for any quantity of water.Goals and Learning ObjectivesUnderstand that tables, graphs, double number lines, and formulas can be used to represent the same situation.Compare the different representations within a situation and the same representation across similar situations.Understand each representation and how to find the rate in each one.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Sextant Solutions
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Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

The earliest explorers did not have computers or satellites to help them know their exact location. The most accurate tool developed was the sextant to determine latitude and longitude. In this activity, the sextant is introduced and discussed with the class. Students will learn how a sextant can be a reliable tool that is still being used by today's navigators and how computers can help assure accuracy when measuring angles. Also, this activity will show how computers can be used to understand equations even when knowing how to do the math is unknown.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Janet Yowell
Jeff White
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Matt Lippis
Penny Axelrad
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Obi-Wan Adobe: Engineering for Strength
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Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Students conduct an experiment to determine how varying the composition of a construction material affects its strength. They make several adobe bricks with differing percentages of sand, soil, fibrous material and water. They test the bricks for strength by dropping them onto a concrete surface from progressively greater heights. Students graph the experiment results and use what they learn to design their own special mix that maximizes the bricks' strength. During the course of the experiment, students learn about variables (independent, dependent, control) and the steps of the engineering design process.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Engineering
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Jacob Crosby
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Stephanie Rivale
Date Added:
09/18/2014
How Much Sugar is in Bubble Gum?
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Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

Most of the flavoring in gum is due to the sugar or other sweetener it contains. As gum is chewed, the sugar dissolves and is swallowed. After a piece of gum loses its flavor, it can be left to dry at room temperature and then the difference between its initial (unchewed) mass and its chewed mass can be used to calculate the percentage of sugar in the gum. This demonstration experiment is used to generate new questions about gums and their ingredients, and students can then design and execute new experiments based on their own questions.

Subject:
Engineering
Nutrition
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Mary R. Hebrank
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Math, Grade 6, Rate, Using Formulas To Represent Different Rate Relationships
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students write formulas to represent different rate relationships.Key ConceptsA formula is a mathematical way of writing a rule for computing a value.Formulas, like c = 2.50w or d = 20g, describe the relationship between quantities.The formula c = 2.50w describes the relationship between a cost and a quantity that costs $2.50 per unit of weight. Here, w stands for any weight, and c stands for the cost of w pounds at $2.50 per pound.The formula d = 20g describes the relationship between the distance, d, and the number of gallons of gas, g, for a car that gets 20 miles per gallon.Goals and Learning ObjectivesUse equations with two variables to express relationships between quantities that vary together.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Math, Grade 6, Rate, Rules For Computing A Value
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

In this lesson, students use their knowledge of rates, graphs of rates, and formulas to solve problems.Key ConceptsThe formula for a rate is a mathematical way of writing a rule for computing a value. Rate formulas describe a constant relationship between two quantities. Each point on the graph of a rate shows a pair of related values. A graph of a constant rate is a straight line.Goals for Learning ObjectivesUncover any partial understandings and misconceptions students have about rate, graphs of rates, and formulas.Develop a more robust understanding of rate.Help identify which Gallery problems students should work on.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Math, Grade 6, Putting Math to Work, The Relationship Between Sound & Light
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating
0.0 stars

Students create and implement a problem-solving plan to solve another problem involving the relationship between the sound of thunder and the distance of the lightning.Key ConceptsThroughout this unit, students are encouraged to apply the mathematical concepts they have learned over the course of this year to new settings. Help students develop and refine these problem-solving skills:Creating a problem-solving plan and implementing their plan systematicallyPersevering through challenging problems to find solutionsRecalling prior knowledge and applying that knowledge to new situationsMaking connections between previous learning and real-world problemsCommunicating their approaches with precision and articulating why their strategies and solutions are reasonableCreating efficacy and confidence in solving challenging problems in a real worldGoals and Learning ObjectivesCreate and implement a problem-solving plan.Organize and interpret data presented in a problem situation.Analyze the relationship between two variables.Create a rate table to organize data and make predictions.Apply the relationship between the variables to write a mathematical formula and use the formula to solve problems.Create a graph to display proportional relationships and use this graph to make predictions.Articulate strategies, thought processes, and approaches to solving a problem and defend why the solution is reasonable.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015