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  • CCSS.Math.Content.6.EE.A.2a
Math, Grade 6, Expressions, Peer Review
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Remix and Share
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Students critique the work of other students and revise their own work based on feedback from the teacher and peers.Key ConceptsConcepts from previous lessons are integrated into this unit task: rewriting expressions, using parentheses, and using the distributive property. Students apply their knowledge, review their work, and make revisions based on feedback from you and their peers. This process creates a deeper understanding of the concepts.Goals and Learning ObjectivesApply knowledge of expressions to correct the work of other students.Track and review the choice of strategy when problem solving.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Laws of Arithmetic
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This lesson unit is intended to help you assess how well students are able to: Perform arithmetic operations, including those involving whole-number exponents, recognizing and applying the conventional order of operations; Write and evaluate numerical expressions from diagrammatic representations and be able to identify equivalent expressions; apply the distributive and commutative properties appropriately; and use the method for finding areas of compound rectangles.

Subject:
Geometry
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Shell Center for Mathematical Education
U.C. Berkeley
Provider Set:
Mathematics Assessment Project (MAP)
Date Added:
04/26/2013
Math, Grade 6, Expressions, Mathematical Vocabulary
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Students play an Expressions Game in which they describe expressions to their partners using the vocabulary of expressions: term, coefficient, exponent, constant, and variable. Their partners try to write the correct expressions based on the descriptions.Key ConceptsMathematical expressions have parts, and these parts have names. These names allow us to communicate with others in a precise way.A variable is a symbol (usually a letter) in an expression that can be replaced by a number.A term is a number, a variable, or a product of numbers and variables. Terms are separated by the operator symbols + (plus) and – (minus).A coefficient is a symbol (usually a number) that multiplies the variable in an algebraic expression.An exponent tells how many copies of a number or variable are multiplied together.A constant is a number. In an expression, it can be a constant term or a constant coefficient. In the expression 2x + 3, 2 is a constant coefficient and 3 is a constant term.Goals and Learning ObjectivesIdentify parts of an expression using appropriate mathematical vocabulary.Write expressions that fit specific descriptions (for example, the expression is the sum of two terms each with a different variable).

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Math, Grade 6, Expressions, Writing, Representing & Evaluating Expressions
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Students represent problem situations using expressions and then evaluate the expressions for the given values of the variables.Key ConceptsAn algebraic expression can be written to represent a problem situation.To evaluate an algebraic expression, a specific value for each variable is substituted in the expression, and then all the calculations are completed using the order of operations to get a single value.Goals and Learning ObjectivesDevelop fluency in writing expressions to represent situations and in evaluating the expressions for given values.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Math, Grade 6, Expressions, Distributive Properties of Geometric Models
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Students use a rectangular area model to understand the distributive property. They watch a video to find how to express the area of a rectangle in two different ways. Then they find the area of rectangular garden plots in two ways.Key ConceptsThe distributive property can be used to rewrite an expression as an equivalent expression that is easier to work with. The distributive property states that multiplication distributes over addition.Applying multiplication to quantities that have been combined by addition: a(b + c)Applying multiplication to each quantity individually, and then adding the products together: ab + acThe distributive property can be represented with a geometric model. The area of this rectangle can be found in two ways: a(b + c) or ab + ac. The equality of these two expressions, a(b + c) = ab + ac, is the distributive property.Goals and Learning ObjectivesUse a geometric model to understand the distributive property.Write equivalent expressions using the distributive property.

Subject:
Algebra
Geometry
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Watch out for Parentheses
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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This problem asks the student to evaluate three numerical expressions that contain the same integers yet have differing results due to placement of parentheses.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
08/27/2012
Math, Grade 6, Expressions, Substituting Numbers for Letters
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Students express the lengths of trains as algebraic expressions and then substitute numbers for letters to find the actual lengths of the trains.Key ConceptsAn algebraic expression can be written to represent a problem situation. More than one algebraic expression may represent the same problem situation. These algebraic expressions have the same value and are equivalent.To evaluate an algebraic expression, a specific value for each variable is substituted in the expression, and then all the calculations are completed using the order of operations to get a single value.Goals and Learning ObjectivesEvaluate expressions for the given values of the variables.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Remix
Math, Grade 6, Getting Started, Matching Numeric Expressions to Descriptions
Conditions of Use:
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Students are introduced to classroom routines and expectations, and complete a full mathematics lesson. The class discusses how to clearly present work to classmates. Partner work is modeled, and partners then work to match numerical expressions to corresponding word descriptions. Students read and discuss a summary of the math in the lesson, and then write a reflection about their thoughts.Key ConceptsStudents match a numerical expression to its corresponding description in words. Students interpret parentheses and brackets in numerical expressions and they construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Students learn to use the exponent 2 to represent squaring.Goals and Learning ObjectivesDescribe the classroom routines and expectations.Consider how to present work clearly to classmates.Collaborate with a partner.Critique a partner’s reasoning.Connect a numerical expression to its corresponding word description.Learn to use an exponent of 2 to represent squaring.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Author:
Benjamin White
Date Added:
08/23/2018
Math, Grade 6, Expressions, Using Variables to Represent Measurements
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Students write an expression for the length of a train, using variables to represent the lengths of the different types of cars.Key ConceptsA numerical expression consists of a number or numbers connected by the arithmetic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, and exponentiation.An algebraic expression uses letters to represent numbers.An algebraic expression can be written to represent a problem situation. Sometimes more than one algebraic expression may represent the same problem situation. These algebraic expressions have the same value and are equivalent.The properties of operations can be used to make long algebraic expressions shorter:The commutative property of addition states that changing the order of the addends does not change the end result:a + b = b + a.The associative property of addition states that changing the grouping of the addends does not change the end result:(a + b) + c = a + (b + c).The distributive property of multiplication over addition states that multiplying a sum by a number gives the same result as multiplying each addend by the number and then adding the products together:a(b + c) = ab + ac.Goals and Learning ObjectivesWrite algebraic expressions that describe lengths of freight trains.Use properties of operations to shorten those expressions.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015