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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.9-10.1b
Socratic Seminar: Supporting Claims and Counterclaims
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High school students work in teams to develop claims and anticipate counter-claims given topics about governmental control and oppression related to their reading of Persepolis.Prior to the debate, students discuss their claims and evidence supporting these claims within their teams and also anticipate counter-claims. Each team member takes notes and prepares to either debate for their team or document interesting arguments that occur during the spoken debate. Ensuring participation by all students during this time is critical.The debate begins with one representative from each team who presents their argument to the group. Teams are required to tap out representatives at least once and points are awarded for such things as presenting unique ideas, participation by all group members, and using evidence to support claims. After the debate, students return to their teams to reflect on the process and the content of the seminar.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
Martin Luther's Reformation in Hugo's "The Hunchback of Notre Dame"
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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The setting of Victor Hugo's novel, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" is the fifteenth century, the transitional period between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance/Reformation era. This era ushers in the period known as the modern age and historical events are chronicled through Hugo's novel. Hugo sets The Hunchback of Notre Dame at the decline of feudalism and the infancy of absolutism through Louis XI (Spider King), the rise of a urban middle class and the beginnings of commerce as it is known today. Primarily this novel satirizes the Catholic Church's absolute power -- its abuses, and its excesses. Students will discover how Hugo's satire operates to show the Catholic Church's abuse of power during the late Middle Ages and the early Reformation in The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Nancy Webber
Date Added:
04/04/2000
19th Century Women: Struggle and Triumph
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Ever wonder what women were doing during the 1800s or what is known as the antebellum period of United States history? Men are well represented in our history books as they were the powerful, educated leaders of our country. Women, on the other hand, rarely had opportunities to tell their stories. Powerful stories of brave women who helped shape the history of the United States are revealed to students through journals, letters, narratives and other primary sources. Synthesizing information from the various sources, students write their impressions of women in the Northeast, Southeast, or the West during the Nineteenth Century.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
03/27/2007
Small Group Writing
Rating

Ms. Rosenzweig leads her Bronxville High School students through a writing process in response to Steinbecks Of Mice and Men. In small groups or pairs, students discuss their argument and evidence from the text before beginning to write their response. One student takes notes and writes their first draft during the discussion. Editing then begins with a second student reading the essay aloud Đ an important element of the revision process. Final editing takes place prior to writing the second draft as a group.As a result of this process, the class produces fewer writing samples that are higher quality due to the collaboration and revision process. This allows teachers to provide more meaningful feedback to students and makes the entire process much more manageable.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Teaching Channel
Provider Set:
Teaching Channel
Date Added:
02/26/2013
W.9-10.1b: Developing Claims and Counterclaims Fairly
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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This resource provides a more in depth explanation for the key progression in the language of the standard, as well as strategy suggestions for implementation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Erik Iwersen
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Primary Source Exemplar: Progress, Conflict, and Outcomes
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This unit is centered around an anchor text that may be common among content area teachers in a high school setting. Although this unit may be incorporated into any high-school English class, it is aligned with Common Core standards for 9-10. This unit will primarily focus on informational and argumentative texts, and can be used to incorporate more informational texts (as directed by the Common Core) into English classrooms at the high school level. This unit is best suited to a collaborative model of development in which ELA and content area teachers share an anchor text (The Universal Declaration of Human Rights) and communicate about how to connect diverse skills to common texts and essential questions.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Erik Iwersen
Date Added:
06/14/2017
Grade 10 ELA Module 4
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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In this module, students read, discuss, and analyze nonfiction and dramatic texts, focusing on how the authors convey and develop central ideas concerning imbalance, disorder, tragedy, mortality, and fate.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
07/09/2014
Argumentative Writing Overview
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This video goes over the basics of a 5-paragraph argumentative paper, including the rebuttal. There are examples for each paragraph (introduction + thesis, body paragraphs, rebuttal paragraph, and conclusion).

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Jenna Ellis
Date Added:
01/23/2018