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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.7.1
Interdisciplinary Integrated Unit on Dna/Genetics Part C: Language Arts
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This lesson is part of an interdisciplinary integrated unit on DNA and genetics. The idea is that students will complete a week's worth of activities in science, math, and language arts related to this topic. This lesson is Part C: Language Arts. Students will apply information retrieval skills as they investigate controversial issues on human genetic cloning. Students then will develop a point-of-view essay stating their personal opinion on whether human cloning should or should not be allowed.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Genetics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Jane Lentz
Jimmy White
Marlene Smith
Tori Goldrick
Date Added:
01/09/2003
Making an Evidence-Based Argument for a Raise in the Workplace
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The purpose of this course is for adult learners to improve their communication skills, particularly writing, by arguing effectively for a raise. Their arguments will consist of evidence-based claims. The target audience of this lesson is adults at the 7th grade reading and writing level. This lesson is intended for a real classroom. This module involves reading, writing and speaking components. The entire lesson will take roughly 30 minutes to complete.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Christina McNish
Date Added:
10/04/2018
School Uniforms: Point of View Writing
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This lesson deals with an issue that is very important to students: school uniforms. It incorporates writing, speaking, and math.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Linda Bulluck
Date Added:
06/25/1999
19th Century Women: Struggle and Triumph
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Read the Fine Print
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Ever wonder what women were doing during the 1800s or what is known as the antebellum period of United States history? Men are well represented in our history books as they were the powerful, educated leaders of our country. Women, on the other hand, rarely had opportunities to tell their stories. Powerful stories of brave women who helped shape the history of the United States are revealed to students through journals, letters, narratives and other primary sources. Synthesizing information from the various sources, students write their impressions of women in the Northeast, Southeast, or the West during the Nineteenth Century.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
03/27/2007
Love it or Fix it: How can I design my dream bedroom?
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During this problem-based blended learning module students will be designing their dream bedroom as well as creating a scale drawing of the items they chose to be in their bedroom.  The launch activity introduces the students to Scale City, which is a video that explores scale models in the real world. Students are then given dimensions for a fictional bedroom to furnish with items of their choosing. Price is not considered in this module, but a budget could be introduced as an extension of the module.  Students will then spend time researching items that they would want to place in their bedroom with the area constraints given. Students will have the opportunity to provide each other peer feedback on their bedroom designs.  Once students have a rough idea of their bedroom design, they will spend some time creating a scale drawing of their bedroom on graph paper. This will give students the opportunity to use a scale factor to create a scale drawing. Students will again be provided feedback on their designs and be given time to reflect and redesign as needed.  If students need extra time to practice using a scale factor and creating scale models, a station rotation lesson has been included as an optional resource.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Can YOU save the Roman Empire?
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In this problem-based learning module, students will use their knowledge of the ancient Roman Empire and will work to analyze critical theories historians agree contributed to the fall of Rome. Students will then work to compare the problems faced by the Romans with problems citizens of the United States still largely face today. Through this investigation, students should recognize how modern technology, government agencies, laws and resources help to solve societal problems that could have once destroyed an empire. With this new understanding, students should work to present a solution to a major problem that plagued the Roman Empire during the years leading up to its collapse.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Creating Peaceful Change
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While studying the Articles of Confederation government and the Constitutional Convention in this problem-based learning module, the students will determine the benefits of peacefully changing an inept government.  They will deduce the crucial steps needed for peaceful change to happen within a society.  An area of research will be chosen to help solve a problem critical to the students’ middle school lives.  Feedback will be gathered through a video interview or a Google Form survey of crucial stakeholders.  Students will research the alternatives to improve upon their selected problem.  Students will present their findings to a decision maker and wait to receive feedback.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Date Added:
11/22/2017
Picture This:  Combining Infographics and Argumentative Writing
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OVERVIEW
Students need to practice all types of writing, and oftentimes argumentative writing is ignored in favor of persuasive writing. In fact, students may not even understand there is a difference between these two types of writing. In this lesson, students examine the differences between argumentative writing and persuasive writing. After choosing topics that interest them, students conduct research which becomes the foundation for their argumentative essays.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
04/01/2017
Territory and Treaty Making: A study of Tribes, Westward Expansion, and Conflict
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No Strings Attached
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This unit is focused on the examination of a single topic, in this case, the Native Americans of the inland Northwest and conflict that arose when other non-native people started to settle in the northwest, and to specifically address the native populations that lived in the inland northwest. The materials were created to be one coherent arc of instruction focused on one topic. The module was designed to include teaching notes that signal the kind of planning and thinking such instruction requires: close reading with complex text, and specific instructional strategies or protocols are described that support students’ reading and writing with evidence are described in enough detail to make it very clear what is required of students and how to support students in doing this rigorous work. Materials include summative assessment of content and process, central texts, key resources, and protocols that support and facilitate student learning.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Leslie Heffernan
Date Added:
02/16/2018
Is Galileo a Heretic?
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A team of middle school teachers developed an integrated unit spanning math, social studies and ELA, and focused the unit centering on the life of Galileo, including some of his investigations, his beliefs based on evidence, and his conflicts with the Catholic church.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Mathematics
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Cassandra Torrez
Suzanne Evans
Lynn Dillon
Date Added:
01/28/2016
How do I plan a party for a given amount of guest for under $2,500?
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In this problem-based learning module, students will be given the chance to plan their idea of the perfect party.  They are given a budget of $2,500, this is the maximum amount of money they can use.  The goal is for students to plan a party that they think people would want to attend and would enjoy being a part of.  The students will need to come up with categories of what their party will need (food/drink, decorations, entertainment, location, etc).  These will then be the stations students will move at their own pace through to complete the party planning.  At each station they will need to identify what they are doing to have/do for the party and how much it will cost.  They will then have to figure out the unit cost (cost per person) for that category. The final station should allow for students to find the total cost of their part and total unit cost per person for the party.  If the total cost exceeds $2,500 students should make adjustments as needed.Students will then create an advertisement (commercial, flyer, poster etc.) to promote their party as the “PARTY OF THE YEAR!”Students will then present these advertisements to school staff, parents, administrators etc. to vote on the party they would want to throw for their own child. They should take into consideration cost per person, entertainment, and enjoyment of the party.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Standing up against a Dystopian Society
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During this problem-based learning unit, students will explore dystopian societies of past and in short stories in order to identify dystopian elements in today’s society.  In turn, students will have a choice between multiple product outputs in which they will apply what they have learned to modern day life and provide ideas of how to improve our society by combating these dystopian elements.*Students will need some prior knowledge of Nazi Germany, Civil Rights America in 1930’s, Present Day China, and Sierra Leone in order to make connections to why these societies have dystopian elements.

Subject:
English Language Arts
History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Blended Learning Teacher Practice Network
Grade 7 ELA Module 4A
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This eight-week module focuses on a “science and society” topic, engaging students in reading compelling informational text about adolescent brain development and the effects of entertainment screen time on the brain.

In Unit 1, students first read various texts that will build their background knowledge about adolescent brain development in general. Their learning will center around three areas of the brain, namely the prefrontal cortex, the limbic system, and the developing neurons. Students determine main ideas and evidence in diverse media and clarify their learning about this complex content. Then they begin to focus on the issue of screen time and how it may affect teenagers.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Life Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
01/24/2014
Climate Change Summit by T. Goldring & T. Kabealo (47.WCS)
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Through a mock summit simulation, students explore current questions about climate change issues and the validity of climate change claims. Students argue for and against implementation of solutions, using research to support arguments. During the research phase, students use an online Chrome extension (Diigo) to create a shared database of current climate change multimedia information that will support their claims. During the summit, students assume the role of an ambassador for a specific country. Then, students use their collected research to take a position which either validates or denies current climate change assertions such as: Climate change is a global issue and demands a unified response.Climate change is caused by human activity. We should demand utility companies to use 20% electricity from renewable energy sources.We should regulate CO2 as a pollutant.  Finally, students create a multimedia presentation that represents their country’s final stance on the climate change issue and the summit’s suggested solutions.Standards:Ohio Science (Grade 7)CCSS ELA (Grade 7) 

Subject:
Environmental Science
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Cathryn Chellis
Argumentative Writing Overview
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This video goes over the basics of a 5-paragraph argumentative paper, including the rebuttal. There are examples for each paragraph (introduction + thesis, body paragraphs, rebuttal paragraph, and conclusion).

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Jenna Ellis
Date Added:
01/23/2018