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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.6.4
Literature Biography Project
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For this project, students will learn to develop the various processes used in researching and writing a biographical research paper, including brainstorming, notetaking, outlining, creating a bibliography, and writing the final draft. This project is designed to act as an independent study geared toward AG or Level 3 and Level 4 students, but each step in the research process can also be taught directly to students in the classroom.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Sandra Dail
Date Added:
06/25/1999
Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum for Grades 6-8
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
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This FREE, pioneering curriculum is designed to empower students to think critically and make informed choices about how they create, communicate online

Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Common Sense Media
Provider Set:
Individual Authors
Author:
Individual Authors
Date Added:
06/29/2011
Common Core Curriculum Grade 6 ELA - Making Evidence-Based Claims
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Making Evidence-Based Claims ELA/Literacy Units empower students with a critical reading and writing skill at the heart of the Common Core: making evidence-based claims about complex texts. These units are part of the Developing Core Proficiencies Program. This unit develops students' €abilities to make evidence-based claims through activities based on a close reading of the Commencement Address Steve Jobs delivered at Stanford University on June, 2005.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
04/04/2013
Grade 6 ELA Module 1
Conditions of Use:
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In this module, students are involved in a deep study of mythology, its purposes, and elements. Students will read Rick Riordan’s The Lightning Thief (780L), a high-interest novel about a sixth-grade boy on a hero’s journey. Some students may be familiar with this popular fantasy book; in this module, students will read with a focus on the archetypal journey and close reading of the many mythical allusions. As they begin the novel, students also will read a complex informational text that explains the archetypal storyline of the hero’s journey which has been repeated in literature throughout the centuries. Through the close reading of literary and informational texts, students will learn multiple strategies for acquiring and using academic vocabulary. Students will also build routines and expectations of discussion as they work in small groups. At the end of Unit 1, having read half of the novel, students will explain, with text-based evidence, how Percy is an archetypal hero. In Unit 2, students will continue reading The Lightning Thief (more independently): in class, they will focus on the novel’s many allusions to classic myths; those allusions will serve as an entry point into a deeper study of Greek mythology. They also will continue to build their informational reading skills through the close reading of texts about the close reading of texts about the elements of myths. This will create a conceptual framework to support students’ reading of mythology. As a whole class, students will closely read several complex Greek myths. They then will work in small groups to build expertise on one of those myths. In Unit 3, students shift their focus to narrative writing skills. This series of writing lessons will scaffold students to their final performance task in which they will apply their knowledge about the hero’s journey and the elements of mythology to create their own hero’s journey stories.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/01/2013
The American Dream
Conditions of Use:
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This lesson invites students to search and sift through rare print documents, early motion pictures, photographs, and recorded sounds from The Library of Congress. Students experience the depth and breadth of the digital resources of the Library, tell the story of a decade, and help define the American Dream.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Performing Arts
Education
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
06/07/2000
Grade 6 ELA Module 4
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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In this eight-week, research-based module, students explore the benefits and harmful consequences of the use of the controversial pesticide DDT. In Unit 1, students begin the novel Frightful’s Mountain (640L) by Jean Craighead George. Students will read closely to practice citing evidence and drawing inferences from this compelling text as they begin to think about the interactions between people and the natural world. They also will read informational texts and watch videos to gather evidence and trace arguments about the uses, benefits, and harmful consequences of DDT, its affects on the environment, and its use in the battle against malaria. At the end of this unit, students will participate in a Fishbowl discussion to begin to articulate their evidence-based opinions about the central question: “Do the benefits of DDT outweigh its harmful consequences?” In Unit 2, students will read the remainder of the novel, focusing on the how the main character, Frightful, is affected by the actions of other people and her own interactions with the natural world. Students also will engage in a research project, continuing to explore the central question of the module. Students will read several complex texts, both print and digital, in order to collect relevant information in a structured researcher’s notebook. To help them grapple with this issue, students learn a decision-making process called “Stakeholder Consequences Decision-Making” (see the end of this document for details). This process will help students understand the implications of various choices, and will scaffold their ability to determine—based on evidence and their own values—what they believe can and should happen. Unit 2 culminates with students synthesizing all their reading thus far in order to make and present their own evidence-based claim about the use of DDT. In Unit 3, students choose the most compelling evidence and write a position paper in which they support the claim they made (at the end of Unit 2). As a mid-unit assessment, students will submit their best draft of this position paper. As an end of unit assessment, students will submit a published copy, as well as a reflection on the writing process. As the final performance task, students share their findings by creating a scientific poster and presenting that poster to peers during a hosted gallery.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
10/04/2013
African-American Identity in the Gilded Age
Conditions of Use:
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Examine the tension experienced by African-Americans as they struggled to establish a vibrant and meaningful identity based on the promises of liberty and equality in the midst of a society that was ambivalent towards them and sought to impose an inferior definition upon them. The primary sources used are drawn from a time of great change that begins after Reconstruction's brief promise of full citizenship and ends with the First World War's Great Migration, when many African-Americans sought greater freedoms and opportunities by leaving the South for booming industrial cities elsewhere in the nation. The central question posed by these primary sources is how African-Americans were able to form a meaningful identity for themselves, reject the inferior images fastened upon them, and still maintain the strength to keep "from being torn asunder." Using the primary sources presented here, look for answers that bring your ideas together in ways that reflect the richness of the African-American experience.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Author:
Pat Adams-Caskie
Scott Culclasure
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Indian Boarding Schools
Conditions of Use:
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In the late 1800s, the United States supported an educational experiment that the government hoped would change the traditions and customs of American Indians. Special boarding schools were created in locations all over the United States with the purpose of "civilizing" American Indian youth . Thousands of Native American children were sent far from their homes to live in these schools and learn the ways of white culture. Many struggled with loneliness and fear away from their tribal homes and familiar customs. Some lost their lives to the influenza, tuberculosis, and measles outbreaks that spread quickly through the schools. Others thrived despite the hardships, formed lifelong friendships, and preserved their Indian identities. Through photographs, letters, reports, interviews, and other primary documents, students explore the forced acculturation of American Indians through government-run boarding schools.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
04/09/2004
What in the World Is That?
Conditions of Use:
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Rating

This site examines 16 inventions: the submarine, battery radio, cotton gin, reaper, electron microscope, telephone, gramophone, telecommunication cable, snow gauge, ornithopter, airphibian, and others.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Game
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
11/30/2004
Waldseemüller's Map: World 1507
Conditions of Use:
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The 1507 World Map by Martin Waldseemüller is one of the world's most important maps. For the first time, this map labels America and shows the continent as a separate land mass. It is often referred to as America's Birth Certificate. Students will investigate this map by looking closely at the details of each section of the map and then draw conclusions on the revelation of this new and unusual world to the people of 1507.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
02/16/2011
What Do You See?
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This is a lesson in which students analyze a single Civil War photograph and then find and analyze related images. The aim is to help students see relationships between the Civil War and American industrialization.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
07/07/2000
Around the World in 1896
Conditions of Use:
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This is a lesson in which students take a trip around the world in 1896 using an online collection of 900 images. The collection includes photos of railroads, elephants, camels, horses, sleds and sleighs, sedan chairs, rickshaws, and other types of transportation, as well as city views, street and harbor scenes, landscapes, and people in North Africa, Asia, Australia, and Oceania.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
07/08/2003
Suffrage Strategies: Voices for Votes
Conditions of Use:
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This lesson involves students in examining primary source documents related to the women's suffrage movement. Students identify methods used to change attitudes about suffrage for women and then create original documents encouraging citizens to vote in current elections.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
08/18/2004
Text Structures-Informational Writing/Mesopotamia Unit
Conditions of Use:
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This 18 day unit explicitly teaches text structures, summary, text features, reading informational text about Mesopotamia, and writing a book about Mesopotamia. Instruction moves from high scaffolding to moderate scaffolding to independent practice as students become familiar with the various text structures, how to identify them, what graphic organizer will work with each text structure, how to use notes recorded in graphic organizers to write summaries, and how to compile an informational book. Mesopotamia is the content used as an anchor.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
08/12/2013
Natural Disasters: Nature's Fury
Conditions of Use:
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This lesson invites students to read personal accounts of natural disasters in the U.S. during the late 1800s and early 1990s -- the great Chicago fire (1871), the Johnstown Flood (1889), the San Francisco earthquake and fire (1906), the Titanic (1912), the 1918 Flu Epidemics, the Dust Bowl (1930s-40s). Students research a disaster and create a presentation in which they assume the role of a witness to the event.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ecology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
06/01/2004