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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.4
Toulmin Argument  Essay
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This lesson extends over several class periods. Students view a Prezi presentation on Toulmin's argument and complete an assignment based on the presentation. Students then write an argument essay about the power of prevailing passion over reason.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
08/12/2013
Demonstrating Understanding of Richard Wright's Rite of Passage
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Students use the elements of persuasion for a specific audience to demonstrate their understanding of Richard WrightŐs accessible and engaging coming-of-age novel, "Rite of Passage.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/30/2013
Persuading an Audience: Writing Effective Letters to the Editor
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Students use persuasive writing and an understanding of the characteristics of letters to the editor to compose effective letters to the editor on topics of interest to them.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
10/04/2013
English Language Arts 11
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English III, American Literature, explores the literature of America from the narratives of the early colonists to the foundational documents of our forefathers, and the literature of our modern times. In English III, you will gain a firm grasp of the various literary periods throughout American history as well as the ability to analyze different genres and styles of notable American authors. As you progress through the course, you will gain an appreciation for American literature and an understanding of how the literature of the day acted as a reflection of the historical period from which it evolved. This course will also give you the opportunity to hone your own writing skills as you identify the characteristics of effective writing for a variety of different purposes and audiences.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
08/05/2013
Digital Reflections: Expressing Understanding of Content Through Photography
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Striking images can leave lasting impressions on viewers. In this lesson, students make text-self-world connections to a nature- or science-related topic as they collaboratively design a multimedia presentation.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
08/23/2013
Summary and "The Fallacy of Success"
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This set of lessons extends over several days. Students work with a partner to read and annotate G.K. Chesterton's "The Fallacy of Success." Students take notes which summarize each section of the text. Students write an objective summary of the text, identifying two claims and determining how those claims are developed in the text.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Utah Education Network
Date Added:
08/12/2013
Veterans Day
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Students write biographical poems about a soldier. On November 11, the United States honors those soldiers who have fought for their country in military service. Across America, ceremonies are held to commemorate the efforts of the armed forces past and present.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Author:
AZ
Nancy Haugen
Date Added:
11/01/2011
Student Portfolio: Cyberbullying
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
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This is a blank template for students to use for their research portfolios. Students will create an OER Commons account, access this resource, make a copy and rename the resource, and then add their own assignments and projects to the template.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Mathematics
Social Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Sara Layton
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Immigration and Migration: Today and During the Great Depression
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This is a 4-week American history unit for high school. Students conduct oral history interviews, analyze photos, evaluate the relevance and accuracy of primary and secondary sources, discuss changes in immigration and migration over time, and more.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Author:
Evelyn Bender Byron Stoloff
Date Added:
03/06/2001
Billy the Kid: Perspectives on an Outlaw
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This lesson relates to the westward movement in the United States in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Students analyze the role that gunfighters played in the settlement of the West and distinguish between their factual and fictional accounts using American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936 - 1940.Billy the Kid alias, William H. Bonney, alias Henry McCarty, alias Kid Antrim, etc. is an example of the typical gunfighter. He was born in the 1850s and died in 1881 when he was shot by Sheriff Pat Garrett. Billy serves as the focus of the lesson.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
Date Added:
07/28/2004
Grade 11 ELA Module 4
Conditions of Use:
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In this module, students read, discuss, and analyze literary texts, focusing on the authors’ choices in developing and relating textual elements such as character development, point of view, and central ideas while also considering how a text’s structure conveys meaning and creates aesthetic impact. Additionally, students learn and practice narrative writing techniques as they examine the techniques of the authors whose stories students analyze in the module.|

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
11/13/2014
Family Living Pathway
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This course is for students who are interested in maintaining a healthy and happy lifestyle. This course will appeal to food and nutrition enthusiasts. The course is designed for students to understand the principles of food, nutrition, cooking skills, and how to understand finances. You will understand different topics such as healthy eating habits, food safety, cooking terms, balancing budgets, and other important things that will help you live your life on a daily basis.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
06/01/2018
The Argumentative Research Project: A Step-by-Step Course
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This resource is designed to walk students through the process of completing a research project in any field of study. It covers the earliest stages of brainstorming and discussing, continues through researching and compiling sources; writing, documenting, revising, and polishing a paper; and finally presenting the research topic to a wider audience in a professional manner. The focus is on MLA format, though the course could be modified for other formats.

The first unit is an introduction to the project. It asks students to draw on knowledge of issues affecting their own community and world to help generate discussion that could eventually lead to a research topic.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Social Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Reading
Author:
Sara Layton
Date Added:
01/28/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law
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The laws that govern and the social norms that regulate society are not always fair, legal, moral, or ethical. What is a person to do about all this injustice? What are the hazards of righting injustices or changing social norms? And what are the dangers of doing nothing?

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate Antigone, “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” and Pygmalion.
Students write a literary analysis showing the effect of social class or the law on a character’s life.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How do social class and legal institutions shape literary characters’ lives (and presumably our lives)?
How does social class affect a person in dealing with the law (protect a person, hurt a person)?
How is social class determined in America and in other places in the world?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution
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People often say that mankind should learn from history. Charles Dickens, whose books are considered classics, set his novel A Tale of Two Cities in the past. He wanted his readers to learn from the bloody French Revolution and from the widespread brutality in London. Both cities (Paris and London) offer the reader a glimpse into dark and dangerous times. As students read about Dickens's Victorian setting and learn his view of the French Revolution, they will think about what makes a just world. Students will have a chance to think about their own experiences, and, using techniques they have learned from Charles Dickens, they will do some writing that sends a message about your own world.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

To complete the unit accomplishments, students will:

Read the Charles Dickens novel A Tale of Two Cities.
Read several short pieces, including a biography of Dickens and excerpts from other literature, to help them understand Dickens’s world and the world of the novel.
Explore new vocabulary to build their ability to write and speak using academic language.
Practice close reading and participate in several role plays and dramatic readings to help them experience the dramatic writing style of Charles Dickens.
Write a vignette and a short narrative piece, and practice using descriptive detail and precise language.
Write a reflection about the meaning of Dickens’s novel.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How does good storytelling affect the reader, and how can a good story promote change in the world?
What was the Victorian view of gender roles?
How can power be abused?
What is loyalty ? What are the limits of loyalty?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
Remix
Student
Conditions of Use:
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This is a blank template for students to use for their research portfolios. Students will create an OER Commons account, access this resource, make a copy and rename the resource, and then add their own assignments and projects to the template.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Author:
Sara Layton
Date Added:
08/08/2019
Grade 11: Writers on Writing (Remix) Days 3 to 5
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Unit Overview:  The Writers on Writing Unit engages students in reading, analyzing, and creating literacy narratives, or stories about learning to read and write. The unit begins by asking students to view and read literacy narratives, and to analyze author’s literacy narratives through annotation, discussion, and writing a formal analysis essay. As students go through the narratives, they are asked to analyze author technique and purpose, paying close attention to style, syntax, and organization in preparation for writing their own authentic literacy narratives and ultimately creating digital storytelling projects about those narratives. By the end of this unit, students will have composed analysis writing, creative nonfiction, and multimedia stories. They will have had the ability to select certain reading assignments, to work in groups and with partners to brainstorm, edit, and revise, and they will have had guided writing lessons on composing strong sentences.  Days 3 to 5 Overview:   These plans are for Days 3 to 5 of the Writers on Writing Unit. On day 3, students listen to podcasts about different perspectives on struggling to read. They then complete a pre-assessment, reading and analyzing a literacy narrative with guided style analysis notes. Students will then review the pre-assessment activity in preparation for reading their own selections of professional literacy narratives on day 2. The lesson will culminate with students writing an analysis of a professional literacy narrative. Image source: "Idea" from Pxhere.com

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Audrey Ruoff
Date Added:
06/27/2018
Grade 11 ELA Module 3
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In Module 11.3, students engage in an inquiry-based, iterative process for research. Building on work with evidence-based analysis in Modules 11.1 and 12.2, students explore topics that have multiple positions and perspectives by gathering and analyzing research based on vetted sources to establish a position of their own. Students first generate a written evidence-based perspective, which will serve as the early foundation of what will ultimately become a written research-based argument paper. The research-based argument paper synthesizes and articulates several claims using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence to support the claims. Students read and analyze sources to surface potential problem-based questions for research, and develop and strengthen their writing by revising and editing.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
09/15/2014