Search Results (307)

View
Selected filters:
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.8.4
King andrew The First
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A caricature of Andrew Jackson as a despotic monarch, probably issued during the Fall of 1833 in response to the President's September order to remove federal deposits from the Bank of the United States. The print is dated a year earlier by Weitenkampf and related to Jackson's controversial veto of Congress's bill to recharter the Bank in July 1832. However, the charge, implicit in the print, of Jackson's exceeding the President's constitutional power, however, was most widely advanced in connection not with the veto but with the 1833 removal order, on which the President was strongly criticized for acting without congressional approval. Jackson, in regal costume, stands before a throne in a frontal pose reminiscent of a playing-card king. He holds a "veto" in his left hand and a scepter in his right. The Federal Constitution and the arms of Pennsylvania (the United States Bank was located in Philadelphia) lie in tatters under his feet. A book "Judiciary of the U[nited] States" lies nearby. Around the border of the print are the words "Of Veto Memory", "Born to Command" and "Had I Been Consulted." |Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf cites a variant with 20 lines of letterpress below, attacking Jackson as "a king who has placed himself above the law."|Weitenkampf, p. 26.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1833-4.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Grade 8 ELA Module 1
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this module, students will develop their ability to read and understand complex text as they consider the challenges of fictional and real refugees. In the first unit, students will begin Inside Out & Back Again, by Thanhha Lai, analyzing how critical incidents reveal the dynamic nature of the main character, Ha, a 10-year-old Vietnamese girl whose family is deciding whether to flee during the fall of Saigon. The novel, poignantly told in free verse, will challenge students to consider the impact of specific word choice on tone and meaning. Students will build their ability to infer and analyze text, both in discussion and through writing. They then will read informational text to learn more about the history of war in Vietnam, and the specific historical context of Ha’s family’s struggle during the fall of Saigon. In Unit 2, students will build knowledge about refugees’ search for a place to call home. They will read informational texts that convey universal themes of refugees’

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/01/2013
5 To One Ha
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Another show of Northern optimism in the early months of the Lincoln administration. Uncle Sam approaches from the left holding a bayonet, causing five Southern soldiers to flee in panic to the right. In their haste to retreat the Confederates drop their flag, muskets, a hat, and a boot. A black child and two black men, one fiddling, watch with obvious glee from the background. Prominent in the center foreground are a mound marked "76" bearing an American flag and a crowing cock. In the background are the Capitol at Washington (left) and the palmetto trees of South Carolina (right).|Entered . . . by W. Wiswell . . . Ohio, June 8th 1861.|The Library's copy of the print is the copyright deposit impression.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 132.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-28.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
"ottos Mops" By Ernst Jandl
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This lesson is designed for students to enjoy a short amusing poem, as well as refine their knowledge of short "o" and long "o" sounds, and use higher order thinking skills to analyze who or what otto and mops are

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Helga Fasciano
Date Added:
06/22/2004
The Globe-Man After Hearing of The Vote On The Sub-Treasury Bill
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Evidently a companion to "The Globe Man Listening to Webster's speech on the Specie Circular" (no. 1838-3), the small, bust-length caricature of Democratic editor Francis Preston Blair shows him looking even more cadaverous and morose. The title refers to the defeat of Van Buren's Independent Treasury Bill in 1838. The print was registered for copyright on July 6, 1838, soon after the bill was voted down late in the second session of the Twenty-fifth Congress.|Entd . . . 1838 by H.R. Robinson . . . Southn. Dist. of N.Y.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y.|Probably drawn by Napoleon Sarony.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 54.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1838-4.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The (Fort) Monroe Doctrine
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

On May 27, 1861, Benjamin Butler, commander of the Union army in Virginia and North Carolina, decreed that slaves who fled to Union lines were legitimate "contraband of war," and were not subject to return to their Confederate owners. The declaration precipitated scores of escapes to Union lines around Fortress Monroe, Butler's headquarters in Virginia. In this crudely drawn caricature, a slave stands before the Union fort taunting his plantation master. The planter (right) waves his whip and cries, "Come back you black rascal." The slave replies, "Can't come back nohow massa Dis chile's contraban." Hordes of other slaves are seen leaving the fields and heading toward the fort.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 126.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-37.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Antimasonic Convention In Valdimor [on The] Corner-Stone March
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

An illustrated sheet music cover for a march dedicated to the Masons. According to the text the march was performed "at the Ceremony of laying the Corner Stone of the Masonic Temple, Boston." The illustration parodies the national convention of the Antimasonic party, held in September 1831 in Baltimore ("Valdimor"). The convention nominated William Wirt for President and Amos Ellmaker for Vice President. The attendees are pictured as asses, geese, goats, and other animals gathered at a table presided over by a donkey wearing spectacles (center). A horse at left says, "Mr. President I should like to know what course we are to pursue with regard to the Presidency. I hope no candidate will be entered who is not a "full blooded" Antimason. rather than vote for any other I will "run" for the office myself." A cat in the background says, "No secret societies." A pig at right: "...I agree with my friend opposite. To save my own "Bacon" I would not vote for any man who would not go the "Whole Hog" for Antimasonry. A dog: "...I'm not used to many words. I never spin out a long yarn without getting into a "snarl." I've only to say, that since I have em"barked" in this business I am resolved to go the hull figure." On the wall in the background a clock reads five minutes to midnight.|Boston. Published by C. Bradlee 164 Washington St.|Drawn by David Claypool Johnston.|Entered . . . 1832 by C. Bradlee.|The print appears to have been drawn by David Claypool Johnston. Malcolm Johnson records a sketch for the illustration in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society. D. C. Johnston's "Much Ado about Nothing" (see 1832-3), published in Boston slightly later, is akin in style, lettering, and in the nature of the scene. Both prints include the motif of a clock on the background wall.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Johnson, no. 141.|Weitenkampf, p. 27.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1832-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
General Jackson Slaying The Many Headed Monster
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A satire on Andrew Jackson's campaign to destroy the Bank of the United States and its support among state banks. Jackson, Martin Van Buren, and Jack Downing struggle against a snake with heads representing the states. Jackson (on the left) raises a cane marked "Veto" and says, "Biddle thou Monster Avaunt!! avaount I say! or by the Great Eternal I'll cleave thee to the earth, aye thee and thy four and twenty satellites. Matty if thou art true...come on. if thou art false, may the venomous monster turn his dire fang upon thee..." Van Buren: "Well done General, Major Jack Downing, Adams, Clay, well done all. I dislike dissentions beyond every thing, for it often compels a man to play a double part, were it only for his own safety. Policy, policy is my motto, but intrigues I cannot countenance." Downing (dropping his axe): "Now now you nasty varmint, be you imperishable? I swan Gineral that are beats all I reckon, that's the horrible wiper wot wommits wenemous heads I guess..." The largest of the heads is president of the Bank Nicholas Biddle's, which wears a top hat labeled "Penn" (i.e. Pennsylvania) and "$35,000,000." This refers to the rechartering of the Bank by the Pennsylvania legislature in defiance of the adminstration's efforts to destroy it.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf cites another version of the print issued by Robinson with the date 1836, and suggests that the present version is a reversed copy of that. One print with this title was registered for copyright by Robinson on March 29, 1836.|Weitenkampf, p. 39-40.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-7.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Fugitive's Song
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A sheet music cover illustrated with a portrait of prominent black abolitionist Frederick Douglass as a runaway slave. Douglass flees barefoot from two mounted pursuers who appear across the river behind him with their pack of dogs. Ahead, to the right, a signpost points toward New England. The cover's text states that "The Fugitive's Song" was "composed and respectfully dedicated, in token of confident esteem to Frederick Douglass. A graduate from the peculiar institution. For his fearless advocacy, signal ability and wonderful success in behalf of his brothers in bonds. (and to the fugitives from slavery in the) free states & Canadas by their friend Jesse Hutchinson Junr." As the illustration suggests, Douglass himself had escaped from slavery, fleeing in 1838 from Maryland to Massachusetts. He achieved considerable renown for his autobiography "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass," first published in 1845. The Library's copy of "The Fugitive's Song" was deposited for copyright on July 23, 1845. An earlier abolitionist song composed by Hutchinson, "Get Off the Track!" (no. 1844-14), also used a cover illustration to amplify its message.|Boston. Published by Henry Prentiss 33 Court St.|Entered . . . 1845 by Henry Prentiss.|Lith. of E.W. Bouve Boston.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1845-7.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Downfall of Mother Bank
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A pro-Jackson satire applauding the President's September 1833 order for the removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States. The combined opposition to this move from Bank president Nicholas Biddle, Senate Whigs led by Daniel Webster and Henry Clay, and the pro-Bank press are ridiculed. On the right, Jackson, cheered on by Major Jack Downing, holds aloft an "Order for the Removal of Public Money." Jackson: "Major Jack Downing. I must act in this case with energy and decision, you see the downfall of the party engine and corrupt monopoly!!" Downing: "Hurrah! General! if this don't beat skunkin, I'm a nigger, only see that varmint Nick how spry he is, he runs along like a Weatherfield Hog with an onion in his mouth." From the document emanate lightning bolts which topple the columns and pediment of the Bank, which crash down amidst fleeing public figures and Whig editors. Around them are strewn various newspapers and sheets with "Salary $6,000" and "Printing expenses "$80,000" printed on them. Henry Clay (at left, fallen): "Help me up! Webster! or I shall lose my stakes." Daniel Webster (far left): "There is a tide in the affairs of men, as Shakespeare says, so my dear CLay, look out for yourself." Nicholas Biddle, with the head and hoofs of an ass or demon, runs to the left: "It is time for me to resign my presidency." Two men flee with sacks of "fees." These fugitives may be newspaper editors Mordecai Manuel Noah and James Watson Webb, advocates of the Bank accused of being in the employ of Biddle.|Draw'd off from Natur by Zek. Downing, Neffu to Major Jack Downing.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N. York.|The print appears to be a reversed copy of a work of the same title by Edward Williams Clay, deposited for copyright in the New York District Court on October 5, 1833. Weitenkampf and Davison both list the Clay version.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Century, p. 40. |Davison, no. 62.|Murrell, p. 127.|Weitenkampf, p. 29.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1833-9.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Champion of Despotism
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A satire critical of New York "Courier and Enquirer" editor, James Watson Webb for his journalistic assaults on exiled Hungarian revolutionary leader Louis Kossuth. Weitenkampf dates the cartoon 1852, but it may have appeared as early as December 1851, when Kossuth landed in New York for a much-publicized visit to seek American diplomatic and financial support for Hungary. His visit caused a sensation and he was greeted enthusiastically by most Americans, and was particularly embraced by libertarians and free-soilers. Webb's newspaper, however, was highly critical of Kossuth and his attempts to embroil the United States in the European conflict. Webb strides down the street, with his back to the viewer and a copy of the "Courier & Enquirer" with the headline "Kossuth," protruding from his back pocket. To the left a young apprentice at the entrance of a blacksmith shop points out Webb to his master, who is at work inside. He says, "Say! Boss! he's a comein, yer told me to call yer when he went past, it's the man what wrote all that Stuf agin the Hungarians." The blacksmith looks up and exclaims, "Good Gracious! here Bill, work this bellows here for a minute til I see that man, I wouldn't miss having a good look at that man for a new ten cent peice he must be a curiosity." To the right, two small children and a crowd of people watch Webb pass by, among them a tall man closely resembling Kossuth.|Drawn by John L. Magee.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 112.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1852-2.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The Commander-In-Chief Conciliating The Soldier's Votes On The Battle Field
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A bitterly anti-Lincoln cartoon, based on slanderous newspaper reports of the President's callous disregard of the misery of Union troops at the front. The story that Lincoln had joked on the field at Antietam appeared in the "New York World." Holding a plaid Scotch cap (see "Abraham's Dream--"Coming Events Cast Their Shadows Before,"" no. 1864-42), Lincoln stands on the battlefield at Antietam, which is littered with Union dead and wounded. He instructs his friend Marshal Lamon, who stands with his back toward the viewer and his hand over his face, to "sing us PĚ_Ąicayune Butler,' or something else that's funny."|Signed with monogram: CAL?|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Century, p. 110-111.|Lorant, p. 263.|Weitenkampf, p. 141.|Wilson, p. 292-293.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-30.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Experiments On The Tight Rope
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A figurative portrayal of Whig candidate Winfield Scott's failure in the 1852 presidential contest, attributed by the artist to his alliance with abolitionist interests. Scott is hoisted aloft via a pulley system by various influential supporters, including (left to right): an unidentified man, New York "Times" editor Henry J. Raymond, black abolitionist Frederick Douglass, Boston editor and abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison, Pennsylvania representative David Wilmot, and New York senator William Seward. They try to haul him up to the "President's Chair," which sits on a gallows-like structure, but the rope snaps owing to the "Free Soil" and "Abolition" weights chained to Scott's waist. Scott's supporters fall in unison to the left. Raymond: "You might have known them cussed weights would break the rope!" Seward:"Thus the noble Cesar fell, and you and I & all of us fell down and bloody Locofocoism flourished over us!" Scott (falling): "It may be the effect of my imagination, but it certainly feels as if something has given way!" At left, New York "Tribune" editor Horace Greeley rides a swaybacked horse carrying a "Tariff" bundle. He shouts to Scott, "Hold on General where you are just one minute till I come to help you!" Another man runs after Greeley crying, "Whoa! whoa! I say Greely don't ride that poor old nag to death!" Entering from the right-hand corner are a black man and his wife. The wife points at Scott and says, "Law! Mr. Cesar it seems to me dat de Gemman is gevine de wrong way."|Pubd. by John Childs, 84 Nassau St. N. York.|Signed with monogram: EWC (Edward Williams Clay).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Davison, no. 205.|Weitenkampf, p. 108-109.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1852-31.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Full Tilt For The Capitol
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The artist envisions public repudiation of Democratic hard-money policies, and the triumph of administration opponent Nathaniel P. Tallmadge, a conservative Democrat. Tallmadge, on horseback and armed with a lance "public opinion," rides over a fallen Van Buren, saying, "Roll off that ball, tis the voice of the People, they tolerate no more of your hard money humbugs." Van Buren protests, ". . . take your horse's hoofs from off my shoulder; I've no room for SĚ_Ąober second thoughts' now." He leans against a large ball marked "Solitary and Alone," which rolls over Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton and Treasury Secretary Levi Woodbury. Benton, who wields a quill "Expunger" and holds "Mint Drops," exclaims, "Woodbury get out of my way, or the ball will overwhelm us both." "Mint drops" was a colloquialism for gold coins, and refers to Benton's advocacy of a higher ratio of gold to silver in circulation. (For an earlier use of the giant ball metaphor see "N. Tom O' Logical Studies," no. 1837-14.) Editor Francis Preston Blair (seated on a bench at right) says, "Benton out with your old pistols that you shot Jackson with, & pop down Talmadge & his horse, or he'll reach the Capitol." Behind him appear the faint outlines of the Capitol. At left former postmaster general Amos Kendall and former New York governor William L. Marcy sit on the ground. Kendall asks, "By the powers tis the Bronze Horse, he carries all before him. Marcy what shall we do?" Marcy complains, "Confound it I'm down, quite down, with my britches torn again." Marcy's trousers are mended with a "50 cents" patch. (On Marcy's trousers' patch see &2Executive Mercy/Marcy and the Bambers, &1no. 1838-5.) The print probably appeared during the 1840 presidential campaign, when Tallmadge used his formidable influence in New York State in support of Harrison. It is also possible that it appeared during one of his own bids for reelection in 1838 or 1840. Comparison with other 1840 prints by "HD" supports the later date.|Lith. & pub. by H.R. Robinson, no. 52 Cortlandt St., no. 2 Wall St. N.Y. & Pennsylvania Ave: Washington Dist: Cola.|Signed with monogram: HD (Henry Dacre?).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 66-67.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-38.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Harrison Quadrilles
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

An illustrated sheet music cover for a set of "popular airs" for the piano, dedicated by the publisher to "Whigs of the United States." A Whig campaign piece, the work eulogizes the supposed humble rusticity of presidential candidate William Henry Harrison. In an oval medallion flanked by American flags is a bust portrait of Harrison. Beneath it lie crossed olive branches and above, in a burst of light, stands an eagle holding a streamer that reads "The Hero of Tippecanoe." In the background are Harrison's log cabin with smoking chimney (on the left) and the United States Capitol (on the right). The music sheet sold for fifty cents.|Entered . . . 1840 by F.C. Unger.|Gimber's Lithy. 404, Broadway New York.|New York. Published by Ferdinand C. Unger, late Saml. C. Jollie & Co. 385 Broadway.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-14.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Jackson Ticket. Agriculture, Commerce and Manufactures
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Election ticket with image of a three-masted sailing vessel.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1828-6.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Last Act of The Drama of Secession
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1865 by Gibson & Co. in the Clerks Office of the District Court of the Southern District of Ohio.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013