Search Results (304)

View
Selected filters:
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4
King andrew The First
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A caricature of Andrew Jackson as a despotic monarch, probably issued during the Fall of 1833 in response to the President's September order to remove federal deposits from the Bank of the United States. The print is dated a year earlier by Weitenkampf and related to Jackson's controversial veto of Congress's bill to recharter the Bank in July 1832. However, the charge, implicit in the print, of Jackson's exceeding the President's constitutional power, however, was most widely advanced in connection not with the veto but with the 1833 removal order, on which the President was strongly criticized for acting without congressional approval. Jackson, in regal costume, stands before a throne in a frontal pose reminiscent of a playing-card king. He holds a "veto" in his left hand and a scepter in his right. The Federal Constitution and the arms of Pennsylvania (the United States Bank was located in Philadelphia) lie in tatters under his feet. A book "Judiciary of the U[nited] States" lies nearby. Around the border of the print are the words "Of Veto Memory", "Born to Command" and "Had I Been Consulted." |Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf cites a variant with 20 lines of letterpress below, attacking Jackson as "a king who has placed himself above the law."|Weitenkampf, p. 26.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1833-4.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Uncle Tom’s Cabin
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This seventh grade annotated inquiry provides students with an opportunity to explore how words affect public opinion through an examination of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Students will investigate historical sources related to the novel and reactions in the North and South in order to address the compelling question, “Can words lead to war?” This query takes advantage of the mixed messages students often receive about the power of words. Students’ understanding about how words can make a difference is often grounded in discussions of words used to bully, instead of the power of words to encourage reform. This is an ANNOTATED inquiry with additional information on the questions, tasks, and sources within.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Date Added:
07/10/2017
Grade 7 ELA Module 1
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this 8 eight-week module, students explore the experiences of people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War. They build proficiency in using textual evidence to support ideas in their writing, both in shorter responses and in an extended essay. In Unit 1, students begin the novel A Long Walk to Water (720L) by Linda Sue Park. Students will read closely to practice citing evidence and drawing inferences from this compelling text as they begin to analyze and contrast the points of view of the two central characters, Salva and Nya. They also will read informational text to gather evidence on the perspectives of the Dinka and Nuer tribes of Southern Sudan. In Unit 2, students will read the remainder of the novel, focusing on the commonalities between Salva and Nya in relation to the novel’s theme: how individuals survive in challenging environments. (The main characters’ journeys are fraught with challenges imposed by the environment, including the lack of safe drinking water, threats posed by animals, and the constant scarcity of food. They are also challenged by political and social environments.). As in Unit 1, students will read this literature closely alongside complex informational texts (focusing on background on Sudan and factual accounts of the experiences of refugees from the Second Sudanese Civil War). Unit 2 culminates with a literary analysis essay about the theme of survival. Unit 3 brings students back to a deep exploration of character and point of view: students will combine their research about Sudan with specific quotes from A Long Walk to Water as they craft a two-voice poem, comparing and contrasting the points of view of the two main characters, Salva and Nya,. The two-voice poem gives students an opportunity to use both their analysis of the characters and theme in the novel and their research about the experiences of the people of Southern Sudan during the Second Sudanese Civil War.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/01/2013
5 To One Ha
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Another show of Northern optimism in the early months of the Lincoln administration. Uncle Sam approaches from the left holding a bayonet, causing five Southern soldiers to flee in panic to the right. In their haste to retreat the Confederates drop their flag, muskets, a hat, and a boot. A black child and two black men, one fiddling, watch with obvious glee from the background. Prominent in the center foreground are a mound marked "76" bearing an American flag and a crowing cock. In the background are the Capitol at Washington (left) and the palmetto trees of South Carolina (right).|Entered . . . by W. Wiswell . . . Ohio, June 8th 1861.|The Library's copy of the print is the copyright deposit impression.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 132.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-28.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
ELA: Using Jabberwocky to Discuss Sentence Structure and Meaning
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This lesson uses the Lewis Carroll poem "Jabberwocky" to help students approach difficult, unknown vocabulary. The poem uses nonsense words, but with strong structural and context clues. By using multiple close-reading strategies, students gain confidence reading difficult text.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Jason Foster
Date Added:
01/26/2017
General Jackson Slaying The Many Headed Monster
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A satire on Andrew Jackson's campaign to destroy the Bank of the United States and its support among state banks. Jackson, Martin Van Buren, and Jack Downing struggle against a snake with heads representing the states. Jackson (on the left) raises a cane marked "Veto" and says, "Biddle thou Monster Avaunt!! avaount I say! or by the Great Eternal I'll cleave thee to the earth, aye thee and thy four and twenty satellites. Matty if thou art true...come on. if thou art false, may the venomous monster turn his dire fang upon thee..." Van Buren: "Well done General, Major Jack Downing, Adams, Clay, well done all. I dislike dissentions beyond every thing, for it often compels a man to play a double part, were it only for his own safety. Policy, policy is my motto, but intrigues I cannot countenance." Downing (dropping his axe): "Now now you nasty varmint, be you imperishable? I swan Gineral that are beats all I reckon, that's the horrible wiper wot wommits wenemous heads I guess..." The largest of the heads is president of the Bank Nicholas Biddle's, which wears a top hat labeled "Penn" (i.e. Pennsylvania) and "$35,000,000." This refers to the rechartering of the Bank by the Pennsylvania legislature in defiance of the adminstration's efforts to destroy it.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf cites another version of the print issued by Robinson with the date 1836, and suggests that the present version is a reversed copy of that. One print with this title was registered for copyright by Robinson on March 29, 1836.|Weitenkampf, p. 39-40.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-7.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The (Fort) Monroe Doctrine
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

On May 27, 1861, Benjamin Butler, commander of the Union army in Virginia and North Carolina, decreed that slaves who fled to Union lines were legitimate "contraband of war," and were not subject to return to their Confederate owners. The declaration precipitated scores of escapes to Union lines around Fortress Monroe, Butler's headquarters in Virginia. In this crudely drawn caricature, a slave stands before the Union fort taunting his plantation master. The planter (right) waves his whip and cries, "Come back you black rascal." The slave replies, "Can't come back nohow massa Dis chile's contraban." Hordes of other slaves are seen leaving the fields and heading toward the fort.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 126.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-37.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Conquered Banner
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A sheet music cover for a postwar song lamenting the fall of the Confederacy. A ragged Confederate flag stands draped over an abandoned cannon, which sits in a landscape overgrown with grass and weeds. Almost hidden in the grass is the stock of a rifle.|Entered . . . 1866 by A. E. Blackmar . . . Louisiana.|Lith. Feusier, Hoyle & Co. No. 9, Commercial Place. N.O.|New Orleans. Published by A.E. Blackmar. 167 Canal St.|The Library also has a redrawn version, identical except that the lithographer's imprint is missing.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1866-2.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
American Liberty
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

An illustrated sheet music cover for a patriotic song by Freeman Scott. The title appears on a striped shield with laurel and oak branches below and a flag, liberty pole and cap, spears, and bundled fasces (symbolic of unity) behind.|Entered . . . 1850 by M. Keller & J. Neff . . . Eastern District of Philadelphia.|Philadelphia Mathias Keller & J. Neff . . . Baltimore W. C. Peters.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1850-3.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
America. A National Song
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

An allegorical illustration on the cover of a patriotic song, dedicated to the "National Guards of Philadelphia." A pronouncedly decollete Columbia or Liberty figure sits astride a bald eagle which flies over the globe. The eagle clutches lightning bolts and an olive branch in its talons, while Columbia holds a scroll (probably the Constitution) and an American flag.|Entered . . . 1859 by Lewis Dela . . . Pennsylvania.|Lewis N. Rosenthal Lith. Phila.|Philadelphia, Lee & Walker, 722 Chestnut Street.|The Library's copy of the music cover was deposited for copyright on September 15, 1859.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1859-2.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Cartoon. Gulltown In An Uproar
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

J.L. Magee, publisher, 305 Walnut Str. Philad. Entered according to Act of Congress A.D. 1865, by J.L. Magee in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
[Clay-Frelinghuysen Campaign Badge]
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

An earlier state or proof of number 1844-6, this impression is printed on silk and lacks the "Hoboken Clay Club" overprinting. (The scrolls are left blank.)|Entered . . . 1844 . . . Southern District of New-York, by R. Hemming, 31 Maiden Lane, N. Y.|This proof was deposited for copyright on June 3, 1844.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1844-7.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Democracy. 1832. 1864.
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Two scenes contrast Democratic presidential candidate of 1832 Andrew Jackson and 1864 George B. McClellan. McClellan is portrayed as weak and conciliatory toward the South, whereas his earlier counterpart's staunch preservation of the Union is applauded. In the left panel Jackson berates John C. Calhoun, leader of the Southern nullification effort of 1832. Jackson vows, "By the Eternal! this Union must and shall be preserved: A Traitor's doom to him who acts against it." Calhoun bows deeply in response, pleading, "Pardon! Pardon!" Three men in the background also bow. The South Carolinean Calhoun was a longtime exponent of Southern autonomy. On the right McClellan and running mate Pendleton kneel on the "Chicago Platform" before a standing Jefferson Davis. Davis addresses them, "Gentlemen, I am well pleased with what you ask for, you are men of sense, and to commence with I wish you to call back those fellows, Sherman, Grant and Sheridan also that old Seadog Farragut after that we will see further." The men mentioned are Union generals William T. Sherman, Ulysses S. Grant, and Philip H. Sheridan and Union admiral David G. Farragut. McClellan, who ran on a "peace at any price" plank, offers an olive branch to Davis, begging, "We should like to have Union and Peace dear Mr. Davis but if such is not your pleasure then please state your terms for a friendly separation." Pendleton, behind him, says, "Amen." At the far left a Confederate soldier comments, "Those Northern dogs how they whine!" Beside him another soldier gnaws a corn cob.|Entered . . . 1864 by L. Prang & Co. . . . Mass.|Published by Louis Prang & Co. 159 Washington St. Boston.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Murrell, p. 225.|Weitenkampf, p. 143.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-24.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Dreadful Riot On Negro Hill!
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Another in the "bobalition" series of broadsides, parodying black manners, illiteracy, and dialect. (See no. 1819-2.) The text describes, in the words of a "letter from Phillis to her sister in the country," a nocturnal attack by white Bostonians on black freedmen and their homes. The letter is facetiously dated "Ulie 47th, 180027." The illustration shows a group of white men attacking and stoning a black woman and a man on crutches.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1827-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Federal-Abolition-Whig Trap, To Catch Voters In
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

An illustrated anti-Whig broadside, designed to combat the "Log Cabin campaign" tactics of presidential candidate William Henry Harrison. The text warns the people of New Orleans of Whig election propaganda: "People of Louisiana, above you have an accurate representation of the federal "Log-Cabin" Trap, invented by the "bank-parlor, Ruffle-shirt, silk-stocking" Gentry, for catching the "votes" of the industrious and laboring classes, of our citizens, of both town and country. . . . The "log cabin" is raised to blind you with the belief, that they are your friends . . ." The author then goes on to describe Whig campaign techniques as relying on deception, alcohol, and visual enticements, and as an "appeal to [the people's] passions, with mockeries, humbugs, shows, and parades. . . ." In the illustration a man sucks at a barrel of "Hard Cider" linked by a trip-rod to a precariously tilted log cabin. Above is the "Federal Bank Whig Motto. We Stoop to Conquer."|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-24.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Buck Chase of 1856
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Democratic candidate James Buchanan, as a buck deer, crosses the finish line of a racecourse ahead of competitors Millard Fillmore and John C. Fremont. Spectators cheer in the stands behind. Fillmore appears as an emaciated horse, fallen on the course. Next, Fremont follows close on the heels of Buchanan. Fremont stands astride two horses: one with the head of New York "Tribune" editor Horace Greeley and the other the "wooly nag" of abolitionism. The latter here more closely resembles a filly than a nag. Greeley: "Monte why didn't you lean more on the wooly horse--you gave me all your weight--never mind we've beat the grey Filly [i.e., Fillmore] next time we'ill head off that hard old Buck." Fremont: "Get out--hang you and the Wooly Horse--I could beat that broken down silver grey "Filly" and the old Buck too--had I gone on my own hook." Fillmore: "Oh! Oh! why did'nt I stay in sweet Italy with my friend King Bomba and the lazy Neapolitans--Then I should not have been blowen up like a Bag of wind in this Chase." Buchanan: "Never mind Gentn. I could not "help" beating you, the American Nation wished it so--I will send you all to Ostend--and I promise you that I will have no Tailors in my white House. [As a youth Fillmore had been apprenticed to a tailor.] Mercy on me! to think that this Glorious People should be almost Pierced to Death [a reference to unpopular Democratic incumbent Franklin Pierce] by War and making Free States in this land of Liberty by a set of Fashion inventores 'I'll none of it.'"|Probably drawn by John L. Magee.|Published by John Childs, 84 So. 3rd St. Phila.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1856-18.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The First Great Western Empire: Or, The United States of America
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A patriotic broadside illustrated with emblems of the United States composed chiefly of typographic elements. A large central framework incorporates a small "Temple of Freedom" surmounted by a small Liberty figure, and containing the words "The Federal Constitution." On each side are oval bust portraits of Presidents (left to right) Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison. Above them are small vignettes representing (on the left) Agriculture and Domestic Manufactures, the "immoveable pillars of the Independence of our country," and (on the right) Commerce, "a strong support to our national edifice." In the upper section of the framework are the seal of the United States and a listing of the names of the seventeen states with their 1810 census figures. Various quotations and brief texts are included, the longest of which are an account of George Washington's resignation of his commission, a description of the geography, government, and people of the United States, and the song "Columbia" written by "Dr. Dwight, President of Yale College."|Entered . . . the Fifteenth Day of January, 1812, by Jonathan Clark, of Albany, New-York.|Printed by and for the Authors, at the Press of R. Packard, no. 51 State-Street, Albany.|The broadside is purported to be the eighth edition, of June 1812, and "Executed with American Materials."|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1812-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Great Naval Blockade of Round Island. Showing The Immense Importance of Having An Efficient "right Arm of The National Defence"
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

A satire on Taylor administration efforts to curtail American "filibusters," armed expeditions against Cuba for the purpose of freeing the island from Spanish rule. Specific reference here is to the Navy's blockade of one such expeditionary force, which assembled on Round Island under Colonel G. W. White in early September 1849. The many puzzling references in the dialogue and imagery here aside, it is clear that the artist is also poking fun at the expansionist dreams of Americans of the time who advocated annexation of Cuba, Canada, and even parts of South America. The artist is critical as well of the current Cuban regime. On the shore of Round Island, the would-be invaders sit at a long rustic banquet table. Nearby several youths play with marbles and hoops, while two boys and a man ride a seesaw. Beyond, two men fly star-shaped kites which read "Cuba" and "Canada." The table is set with food, apparently taken from two large baskets at right. Several of the banqueters toast, "The Queen of Slave Traders!" "The Republic of Sierra Madre!" and "Venezuela! St Domingo! and Yucatan!" A man at the head of the table, holding a "N.Y. Express Proclamation" (perhaps Zachary Taylor's 1848 proclamation denouncing the expedition) addresses them, "You should thank us ye Pirates and Robbers of Cuba for saving you from [Spanish governor of Cuba Federico] Roncali's Garrote." One of the diners protests, "We are no Pirates! we dont kidnap people from the United States nor from Africa" (a reference to the Cuban government's alleged abduction of Juan Francisco Garcia y Rey from New Orleans in July 1848 and to Cuba's slave trade). Offshore are several boats, including a U.S. naval frigate with the words "Nine Millions a year" emblazoned on its sail and a small sloop. A man in the sloop calls out to the frigate, "Help! Help! dont let Roncali trample on your laws." The man is former Havana jailer Juan Francisco Garcia y Rey, now held by the Spanish government for freeing Cuban revolutionaries. Garcia y Rey had appealed for help to the American government, on the basis of his illegal abduction by the Spanish consul. To his call comes the response, "We dont care for the laws we are reaping laurels. Mr. Rey." Others on deck on the American ship converse, saying, "This is as safe and more glorious than Tampico" and "La Cronica will let the Negroes loose upon those who escape from the proclamation."|Probably published in New York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 100.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1849-5.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Gladiators of The Senate! The Bulley's of The House
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The artist parodies recent outbreaks of violence in Congress, and offers a pointed comparison between the elevated rhetorical sparring in the Senate and a more physical brand of combat in the House of Representatives. In the left frame members of the Senate (wearing the togas of Roman senators) watch a bout of swordplay between Alabama Democrat Jeremiah Clemens (here "Clements") and South Carolina Democrat Robert Barnwell Rhett. Clemens lunges blindly at his opponent with his sword while covering his face with a shield marked "Valor." Rhett crouches on the floor beneath his own shield, labeled "Piety." Prominent among the onlookers is Missouri senator Lewis Cass who comments, "The Gladiator from South Carolina is certainly one of the most 'talented' men in the 'Dodging Line' our Country has produced--it's astonishing what practice enables us to accomplish." An unidentified senator exclaims, "Admirable! Admirable! what Suppleness and determination. I fearlessly assert that never in this Chamber has the 'Pious Dodge' been better executed." Another unidentified spectator adds, "Very prettilly done! that dodge was about as neatly executed as anything of the kind I have lately seen." In the second frame two "Bulley's of the House" (one probably Albert Gallatin Brown) fight before a gallery of spectators. Two spectators stand on a bench exclaiming, "Let them fight it out and dont let your anxiety make you perspire to freely. Here--Boy? go and ge me a glass of Brandy & some Crackers & Cheese. we may as well have a pleasent time of it--I bet a Hundred to one Brown whips his man in three minutes" and "Shame!!--Shame!! Where's the Sergeant at Arms!"|Probably drawn by John L. Magee.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 105.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1852-38.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Going Up Salt River
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Political cartoons friendly to Van Buren were the rare exception during the 1840 campaign. Here the artist parodies the exploitation by Whig politicians of populist candidate William Henry Harrison. Martin Van Buren stands on the bank of a stream wishing the Harrison party "a quick voyage, take care you dont spill your valuable cargo." Harrison appears as a donkey wading in the shallows with a barrel of "Hard Cider" tied to its tail, carrying senators Henry Clay and Daniel Webster and Virginia representative Henry A. Wise on his back. Harrison: "I feel very much like a donkey!" Webster: "I say Wise do you think we have enough hard cider to last us to the Hedd of Navigation!" Wise: "Oh Webster dont be frightened we have plenty lashed on to the stern. What say you Clay!" Clay: "I'm content!" The image is clumsily drawn, but otherwise resembles Edward Williams Clay's work. There may have been some use of transfer paper in the lithographic process.|Drawn by Edward Williams Clay?|Published by John Childs, 90 Nassau St. New York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 67.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-49.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013