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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RL.7.4
King andrew The First
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A caricature of Andrew Jackson as a despotic monarch, probably issued during the Fall of 1833 in response to the President's September order to remove federal deposits from the Bank of the United States. The print is dated a year earlier by Weitenkampf and related to Jackson's controversial veto of Congress's bill to recharter the Bank in July 1832. However, the charge, implicit in the print, of Jackson's exceeding the President's constitutional power, however, was most widely advanced in connection not with the veto but with the 1833 removal order, on which the President was strongly criticized for acting without congressional approval. Jackson, in regal costume, stands before a throne in a frontal pose reminiscent of a playing-card king. He holds a "veto" in his left hand and a scepter in his right. The Federal Constitution and the arms of Pennsylvania (the United States Bank was located in Philadelphia) lie in tatters under his feet. A book "Judiciary of the U[nited] States" lies nearby. Around the border of the print are the words "Of Veto Memory", "Born to Command" and "Had I Been Consulted." |Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf cites a variant with 20 lines of letterpress below, attacking Jackson as "a king who has placed himself above the law."|Weitenkampf, p. 26.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1833-4.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Uncle Tom’s Cabin
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This seventh grade annotated inquiry provides students with an opportunity to explore how words affect public opinion through an examination of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Students will investigate historical sources related to the novel and reactions in the North and South in order to address the compelling question, “Can words lead to war?” This query takes advantage of the mixed messages students often receive about the power of words. Students’ understanding about how words can make a difference is often grounded in discussions of words used to bully, instead of the power of words to encourage reform. This is an ANNOTATED inquiry with additional information on the questions, tasks, and sources within.

Subject:
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Date Added:
07/10/2017
Grade 7 ELA Module 1
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In this 8 eight-week module, students explore the experiences of people of Southern Sudan during and after the Second Sudanese Civil War. They build proficiency in using textual evidence to support ideas in their writing, both in shorter responses and in an extended essay. In Unit 1, students begin the novel A Long Walk to Water (720L) by Linda Sue Park. Students will read closely to practice citing evidence and drawing inferences from this compelling text as they begin to analyze and contrast the points of view of the two central characters, Salva and Nya. They also will read informational text to gather evidence on the perspectives of the Dinka and Nuer tribes of Southern Sudan. In Unit 2, students will read the remainder of the novel, focusing on the commonalities between Salva and Nya in relation to the novel’s theme: how individuals survive in challenging environments. (The main characters’ journeys are fraught with challenges imposed by the environment, including the lack of safe drinking water, threats posed by animals, and the constant scarcity of food. They are also challenged by political and social environments.). As in Unit 1, students will read this literature closely alongside complex informational texts (focusing on background on Sudan and factual accounts of the experiences of refugees from the Second Sudanese Civil War). Unit 2 culminates with a literary analysis essay about the theme of survival. Unit 3 brings students back to a deep exploration of character and point of view: students will combine their research about Sudan with specific quotes from A Long Walk to Water as they craft a two-voice poem, comparing and contrasting the points of view of the two main characters, Salva and Nya,. The two-voice poem gives students an opportunity to use both their analysis of the characters and theme in the novel and their research about the experiences of the people of Southern Sudan during the Second Sudanese Civil War.

Subject:
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
02/01/2013
5 To One Ha
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Another show of Northern optimism in the early months of the Lincoln administration. Uncle Sam approaches from the left holding a bayonet, causing five Southern soldiers to flee in panic to the right. In their haste to retreat the Confederates drop their flag, muskets, a hat, and a boot. A black child and two black men, one fiddling, watch with obvious glee from the background. Prominent in the center foreground are a mound marked "76" bearing an American flag and a crowing cock. In the background are the Capitol at Washington (left) and the palmetto trees of South Carolina (right).|Entered . . . by W. Wiswell . . . Ohio, June 8th 1861.|The Library's copy of the print is the copyright deposit impression.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 132.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-28.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
ELA: Using Jabberwocky to Discuss Sentence Structure and Meaning
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No Strings Attached
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This lesson uses the Lewis Carroll poem "Jabberwocky" to help students approach difficult, unknown vocabulary. The poem uses nonsense words, but with strong structural and context clues. By using multiple close-reading strategies, students gain confidence reading difficult text.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Jason Foster
Date Added:
01/26/2017
Antimasonic Convention In Valdimor [on The] Corner-Stone March
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An illustrated sheet music cover for a march dedicated to the Masons. According to the text the march was performed "at the Ceremony of laying the Corner Stone of the Masonic Temple, Boston." The illustration parodies the national convention of the Antimasonic party, held in September 1831 in Baltimore ("Valdimor"). The convention nominated William Wirt for President and Amos Ellmaker for Vice President. The attendees are pictured as asses, geese, goats, and other animals gathered at a table presided over by a donkey wearing spectacles (center). A horse at left says, "Mr. President I should like to know what course we are to pursue with regard to the Presidency. I hope no candidate will be entered who is not a "full blooded" Antimason. rather than vote for any other I will "run" for the office myself." A cat in the background says, "No secret societies." A pig at right: "...I agree with my friend opposite. To save my own "Bacon" I would not vote for any man who would not go the "Whole Hog" for Antimasonry. A dog: "...I'm not used to many words. I never spin out a long yarn without getting into a "snarl." I've only to say, that since I have em"barked" in this business I am resolved to go the hull figure." On the wall in the background a clock reads five minutes to midnight.|Boston. Published by C. Bradlee 164 Washington St.|Drawn by David Claypool Johnston.|Entered . . . 1832 by C. Bradlee.|The print appears to have been drawn by David Claypool Johnston. Malcolm Johnson records a sketch for the illustration in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society. D. C. Johnston's "Much Ado about Nothing" (see 1832-3), published in Boston slightly later, is akin in style, lettering, and in the nature of the scene. Both prints include the motif of a clock on the background wall.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Johnson, no. 141.|Weitenkampf, p. 27.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1832-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
General Jackson Slaying The Many Headed Monster
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A satire on Andrew Jackson's campaign to destroy the Bank of the United States and its support among state banks. Jackson, Martin Van Buren, and Jack Downing struggle against a snake with heads representing the states. Jackson (on the left) raises a cane marked "Veto" and says, "Biddle thou Monster Avaunt!! avaount I say! or by the Great Eternal I'll cleave thee to the earth, aye thee and thy four and twenty satellites. Matty if thou art true...come on. if thou art false, may the venomous monster turn his dire fang upon thee..." Van Buren: "Well done General, Major Jack Downing, Adams, Clay, well done all. I dislike dissentions beyond every thing, for it often compels a man to play a double part, were it only for his own safety. Policy, policy is my motto, but intrigues I cannot countenance." Downing (dropping his axe): "Now now you nasty varmint, be you imperishable? I swan Gineral that are beats all I reckon, that's the horrible wiper wot wommits wenemous heads I guess..." The largest of the heads is president of the Bank Nicholas Biddle's, which wears a top hat labeled "Penn" (i.e. Pennsylvania) and "$35,000,000." This refers to the rechartering of the Bank by the Pennsylvania legislature in defiance of the adminstration's efforts to destroy it.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf cites another version of the print issued by Robinson with the date 1836, and suggests that the present version is a reversed copy of that. One print with this title was registered for copyright by Robinson on March 29, 1836.|Weitenkampf, p. 39-40.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-7.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Conquered Banner
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A sheet music cover for a postwar song lamenting the fall of the Confederacy. A ragged Confederate flag stands draped over an abandoned cannon, which sits in a landscape overgrown with grass and weeds. Almost hidden in the grass is the stock of a rifle.|Entered . . . 1866 by A. E. Blackmar . . . Louisiana.|Lith. Feusier, Hoyle & Co. No. 9, Commercial Place. N.O.|New Orleans. Published by A.E. Blackmar. 167 Canal St.|The Library also has a redrawn version, identical except that the lithographer's imprint is missing.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1866-2.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
America. A National Song
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An allegorical illustration on the cover of a patriotic song, dedicated to the "National Guards of Philadelphia." A pronouncedly decollete Columbia or Liberty figure sits astride a bald eagle which flies over the globe. The eagle clutches lightning bolts and an olive branch in its talons, while Columbia holds a scroll (probably the Constitution) and an American flag.|Entered . . . 1859 by Lewis Dela . . . Pennsylvania.|Lewis N. Rosenthal Lith. Phila.|Philadelphia, Lee & Walker, 722 Chestnut Street.|The Library's copy of the music cover was deposited for copyright on September 15, 1859.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1859-2.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
American Liberty
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An illustrated sheet music cover for a patriotic song by Freeman Scott. The title appears on a striped shield with laurel and oak branches below and a flag, liberty pole and cap, spears, and bundled fasces (symbolic of unity) behind.|Entered . . . 1850 by M. Keller & J. Neff . . . Eastern District of Philadelphia.|Philadelphia Mathias Keller & J. Neff . . . Baltimore W. C. Peters.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1850-3.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The Assassination of The Sage of Ashland
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The artist conveys some of the profound disappointment and anger among Henry Clay's many supporters at the nomination of Zachary Taylor at the June 1848 Whig convention in Philadelphia. The convention's act was seen as a betrayal of the elder Whig statesman. In a scene based on act 3, scene 1 of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar," the artist portrays Clay's opponents as treacherous conspirators stalking the unsuspecting statesman. Clay is pictured seated in the library of his estate at Ashland in Kentucky, reading the New York "Tribune," whose editor Horace Greeley was a Clay stalwart. Ten men with raised daggers prepare to attack him from behind. These include various Whig powers Daniel Webster, editor James Watson Webb, former New York mayor William V. Brady, Pennsylvania congressman David Wilmot, Kentucky senator and former Clay ally John J. Crittenden, and New York state party boss Thurlow Weed. Webster: "How many times shall Caesar bleed in sport" Webb: "Liberty! Freedom! Tyranny is dead!!!" Wilmot: "Go to the Pulpit Brutus" Brady: "And you too Cassius" Crittenden: "Stand fast together, lest some friend of Caesar's Should Chance" Weed: "By the necessity of my Nature, Your Enemy".|Drawn by "W.J.C."|Entered . . . 1848 by H.R. Robinson.|Published by H.R. Robinson 31 Park Row, (Opposite the Park Fountain) N. York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Lorant, p. 188.|Weitenkampf, p. 93.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1848-22.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
A Bivouack In Safety Or Florida Troops Preventing A Surprise
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Another parody of Van Buren administration efforts to end the long and costly Second Seminole War in Florida. The War Department was regularly subjected to public and congressional attacks for cruelty, waste, and incompetence in its prosecution of the war. It drew especially heavy fire for the introduction of Cuban bloodhounds to hunt the Seminoles in early 1840. (See "The Secretary of War," no. 1840-5). Several dandified soldiers lounge in a commodious tent as a corps of uniformed bloodhounds stand guard outside. Their standard says "Puppy Guard Sentinel." The soldiers are surrounded by luxury items like "Windsor Soap (soft)," cigars, and "eau de cologne," and one is fanned by an Indian squaw. One soldier remarks, brushing his long hair, "I say Major, as we are in no danger of losing our scalps, we may as well put our Soap locks on the Peace Establishment." Another, playing chess, says, "Since our new Allies from Cuba have joined us, we can have a quiet game of Chess without any fear of a check from our red friends in the Swamp." An older, pipe-smoking soldier laments, "Ah! the Army is not what it was! Where's the Hero of Tippecanoe." (He refers to Whig presidential candidate William Henry Harrison.)|Lith. & pub. by H.R. Robinson 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y. & Pennsa Ave Washington D.C.|Signed with monogram: HD (Henry Dacre?).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Fowble, no. 338.|Murrell, p. 144.|Weitenkampf, p. 59.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-6.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Cartoon. Gulltown In An Uproar
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J.L. Magee, publisher, 305 Walnut Str. Philad. Entered according to Act of Congress A.D. 1865, by J.L. Magee in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Champion of Despotism
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A satire critical of New York "Courier and Enquirer" editor, James Watson Webb for his journalistic assaults on exiled Hungarian revolutionary leader Louis Kossuth. Weitenkampf dates the cartoon 1852, but it may have appeared as early as December 1851, when Kossuth landed in New York for a much-publicized visit to seek American diplomatic and financial support for Hungary. His visit caused a sensation and he was greeted enthusiastically by most Americans, and was particularly embraced by libertarians and free-soilers. Webb's newspaper, however, was highly critical of Kossuth and his attempts to embroil the United States in the European conflict. Webb strides down the street, with his back to the viewer and a copy of the "Courier & Enquirer" with the headline "Kossuth," protruding from his back pocket. To the left a young apprentice at the entrance of a blacksmith shop points out Webb to his master, who is at work inside. He says, "Say! Boss! he's a comein, yer told me to call yer when he went past, it's the man what wrote all that Stuf agin the Hungarians." The blacksmith looks up and exclaims, "Good Gracious! here Bill, work this bellows here for a minute til I see that man, I wouldn't miss having a good look at that man for a new ten cent peice he must be a curiosity." To the right, two small children and a crowd of people watch Webb pass by, among them a tall man closely resembling Kossuth.|Drawn by John L. Magee.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 112.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1852-2.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Capitol Fashions For 1837
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A caricature of President Martin Van Buren issued during the Panic of 1837, strongly critical of his continuation of predecessor Andrew Jackson's hard-money policies. Particular reference is made to the Specie Circular, a highly unpopular order issued by the Jackson administration in December 1836, directing collectors of public revenues to accept only gold or silver (i.e., "specie") in payment for public lands. Designed to curb speculation, the measure was blamed by administration critics for draining the economy of hard money and precipitating the 1837 crisis. Hearkening back to the anti-Jackson "King Andrew the First" (no. 1833-4), the artist portrays Van Buren as a monarch in a princely cloak, treading on the Constitution. He is crowned "in the name of Belzebub . . . Ragamuffin king" by a demon. Van Buren's cloak is trimmed with "shinplasters," the colloquial term for the often worthless small-denomination bank notes which proliferated during the panic. Van Buren says, "I like this cloak amazingly, for now I shall be able to put into execution my Designs without being observed by every quizing, prying Whig. I'm obliged to keep close since my Safety Fund is blown . . ." Under the Safety Fund law, passed during Van Buren's term as governor of New York, banks were required to contribute to a fund used to liquidate the obligations of banks that failed. The fund was quickly exhausted during the panic. On the walls are pictures of "Bequests of the Late Incumbent" (Andrew Jackson), including "The Hickory Stick," worshipped by the masses like the brazen serpent in the Old Testament, Jackson's spectacles and clay pipe, his hat, the Safety Fund balloon in flames, and "the Last Gold Coin," minted in 1829 (the year Jackson first took office). On the wall at right is a headless statue of Jackson holding a "veto" in his right hand (an allusion to Jackson's 1832 veto of a bill to recharter the Bank of the United States). Visible through a window is a street scene where a crowd mobs a theater exhibiting "a Real Gold Coin." Beneath Van Buren's feet are several documents, including the Specie Circular and "petitions," the missives from New York bankers and merchants which deluged the White House calling for repeal of the Circular. A document labeled "Indian claims" refers to another unpopular Jackson legacy: the numerous grievances by tribes like the Cherokees and Seminoles regarding unfair and inhumane government treaties by which they were being displaced and deprived of their lands.|Copyright secured according to law by F.J. Winston.|Published at 89 Nassau St. NY.|Signed: Forbes Delt.|The Library's impression of the print was deposited for copyright on August 29, 1837, and published at the same address as Anthony Fleetwood's "6 Cents. Humbug Glory Bank" (no. 1837-10).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 49.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Commander-In-Chief Conciliating The Soldier's Votes On The Battle Field
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A bitterly anti-Lincoln cartoon, based on slanderous newspaper reports of the President's callous disregard of the misery of Union troops at the front. The story that Lincoln had joked on the field at Antietam appeared in the "New York World." Holding a plaid Scotch cap (see "Abraham's Dream--"Coming Events Cast Their Shadows Before,"" no. 1864-42), Lincoln stands on the battlefield at Antietam, which is littered with Union dead and wounded. He instructs his friend Marshal Lamon, who stands with his back toward the viewer and his hand over his face, to "sing us PĚ_Ąicayune Butler,' or something else that's funny."|Signed with monogram: CAL?|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Century, p. 110-111.|Lorant, p. 263.|Weitenkampf, p. 141.|Wilson, p. 292-293.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-30.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
[Clay-Frelinghuysen Campaign Badge]
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An earlier state or proof of number 1844-6, this impression is printed on silk and lacks the "Hoboken Clay Club" overprinting. (The scrolls are left blank.)|Entered . . . 1844 . . . Southern District of New-York, by R. Hemming, 31 Maiden Lane, N. Y.|This proof was deposited for copyright on June 3, 1844.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1844-7.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Dreadful Riot On Negro Hill!
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Another in the "bobalition" series of broadsides, parodying black manners, illiteracy, and dialect. (See no. 1819-2.) The text describes, in the words of a "letter from Phillis to her sister in the country," a nocturnal attack by white Bostonians on black freedmen and their homes. The letter is facetiously dated "Ulie 47th, 180027." The illustration shows a group of white men attacking and stoning a black woman and a man on crutches.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1827-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Democracy. 1832. 1864.
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Two scenes contrast Democratic presidential candidate of 1832 Andrew Jackson and 1864 George B. McClellan. McClellan is portrayed as weak and conciliatory toward the South, whereas his earlier counterpart's staunch preservation of the Union is applauded. In the left panel Jackson berates John C. Calhoun, leader of the Southern nullification effort of 1832. Jackson vows, "By the Eternal! this Union must and shall be preserved: A Traitor's doom to him who acts against it." Calhoun bows deeply in response, pleading, "Pardon! Pardon!" Three men in the background also bow. The South Carolinean Calhoun was a longtime exponent of Southern autonomy. On the right McClellan and running mate Pendleton kneel on the "Chicago Platform" before a standing Jefferson Davis. Davis addresses them, "Gentlemen, I am well pleased with what you ask for, you are men of sense, and to commence with I wish you to call back those fellows, Sherman, Grant and Sheridan also that old Seadog Farragut after that we will see further." The men mentioned are Union generals William T. Sherman, Ulysses S. Grant, and Philip H. Sheridan and Union admiral David G. Farragut. McClellan, who ran on a "peace at any price" plank, offers an olive branch to Davis, begging, "We should like to have Union and Peace dear Mr. Davis but if such is not your pleasure then please state your terms for a friendly separation." Pendleton, behind him, says, "Amen." At the far left a Confederate soldier comments, "Those Northern dogs how they whine!" Beside him another soldier gnaws a corn cob.|Entered . . . 1864 by L. Prang & Co. . . . Mass.|Published by Louis Prang & Co. 159 Washington St. Boston.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Murrell, p. 225.|Weitenkampf, p. 143.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-24.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013