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  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RH.6-8.7
King andrew The First
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A caricature of Andrew Jackson as a despotic monarch, probably issued during the Fall of 1833 in response to the President's September order to remove federal deposits from the Bank of the United States. The print is dated a year earlier by Weitenkampf and related to Jackson's controversial veto of Congress's bill to recharter the Bank in July 1832. However, the charge, implicit in the print, of Jackson's exceeding the President's constitutional power, however, was most widely advanced in connection not with the veto but with the 1833 removal order, on which the President was strongly criticized for acting without congressional approval. Jackson, in regal costume, stands before a throne in a frontal pose reminiscent of a playing-card king. He holds a "veto" in his left hand and a scepter in his right. The Federal Constitution and the arms of Pennsylvania (the United States Bank was located in Philadelphia) lie in tatters under his feet. A book "Judiciary of the U[nited] States" lies nearby. Around the border of the print are the words "Of Veto Memory", "Born to Command" and "Had I Been Consulted." |Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf cites a variant with 20 lines of letterpress below, attacking Jackson as "a king who has placed himself above the law."|Weitenkampf, p. 26.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1833-4.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Jitterbugs, Swing Kids, and Lindy Hoppers
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No Strings Attached
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the cultural impact of swing dancing. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Performing Arts
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Melissa Jacobs
Date Added:
01/20/2016
The Poetry of Maya Angelou
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No Strings Attached
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This collection uses primary sources to explore the poetry of Maya Angelou. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Literature
Ethnic Studies
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Susan Ketcham
Date Added:
04/11/2016
5 To One Ha
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Another show of Northern optimism in the early months of the Lincoln administration. Uncle Sam approaches from the left holding a bayonet, causing five Southern soldiers to flee in panic to the right. In their haste to retreat the Confederates drop their flag, muskets, a hat, and a boot. A black child and two black men, one fiddling, watch with obvious glee from the background. Prominent in the center foreground are a mound marked "76" bearing an American flag and a crowing cock. In the background are the Capitol at Washington (left) and the palmetto trees of South Carolina (right).|Entered . . . by W. Wiswell . . . Ohio, June 8th 1861.|The Library's copy of the print is the copyright deposit impression.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 132.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-28.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Establishing Borders: The Expansion of the United States, 1846-48
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This site offers geography and history activities showing how two years in history had an indelible impact on American politics and culture. Students interpret historical maps, identify territories acquired by the U.S., identify states later formed from these territories, examine the territorial status of Texas, and identify political, social, and economic issues related to the expansion of the U.S. in the 1840s.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Reading
Unit of Study
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Provider Set:
Smithsonian Center for Education and Museum Studies
Date Added:
09/24/2004
Japanese American Internment During World War II
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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This collection uses primary sources to explore Japanese American internment during World War II. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbott
Date Added:
04/11/2016
American Liberty
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An illustrated sheet music cover for a patriotic song by Freeman Scott. The title appears on a striped shield with laurel and oak branches below and a flag, liberty pole and cap, spears, and bundled fasces (symbolic of unity) behind.|Entered . . . 1850 by M. Keller & J. Neff . . . Eastern District of Philadelphia.|Philadelphia Mathias Keller & J. Neff . . . Baltimore W. C. Peters.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1850-3.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
A Bivouack In Safety Or Florida Troops Preventing A Surprise
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Another parody of Van Buren administration efforts to end the long and costly Second Seminole War in Florida. The War Department was regularly subjected to public and congressional attacks for cruelty, waste, and incompetence in its prosecution of the war. It drew especially heavy fire for the introduction of Cuban bloodhounds to hunt the Seminoles in early 1840. (See "The Secretary of War," no. 1840-5). Several dandified soldiers lounge in a commodious tent as a corps of uniformed bloodhounds stand guard outside. Their standard says "Puppy Guard Sentinel." The soldiers are surrounded by luxury items like "Windsor Soap (soft)," cigars, and "eau de cologne," and one is fanned by an Indian squaw. One soldier remarks, brushing his long hair, "I say Major, as we are in no danger of losing our scalps, we may as well put our Soap locks on the Peace Establishment." Another, playing chess, says, "Since our new Allies from Cuba have joined us, we can have a quiet game of Chess without any fear of a check from our red friends in the Swamp." An older, pipe-smoking soldier laments, "Ah! the Army is not what it was! Where's the Hero of Tippecanoe." (He refers to Whig presidential candidate William Henry Harrison.)|Lith. & pub. by H.R. Robinson 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y. & Pennsa Ave Washington D.C.|Signed with monogram: HD (Henry Dacre?).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Fowble, no. 338.|Murrell, p. 144.|Weitenkampf, p. 59.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-6.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Cartoon. Gulltown In An Uproar
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J.L. Magee, publisher, 305 Walnut Str. Philad. Entered according to Act of Congress A.D. 1865, by J.L. Magee in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Dreadful Riot On Negro Hill!
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Another in the "bobalition" series of broadsides, parodying black manners, illiteracy, and dialect. (See no. 1819-2.) The text describes, in the words of a "letter from Phillis to her sister in the country," a nocturnal attack by white Bostonians on black freedmen and their homes. The letter is facetiously dated "Ulie 47th, 180027." The illustration shows a group of white men attacking and stoning a black woman and a man on crutches.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1827-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Day After The Fair
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A pro-Cass satire, predicting the Democratic nominee's victory over Whig Zachary Taylor and Free Soil candidate Martin Van Buren. After the "fair," or election, Lewis Cass appears at the window of the White House, at upper left. Below him Taylor, pursued by bloodhounds, tries unsuccessfully to climb up the building's downspout, which is labeled "Whig Platform." The bloodhounds recall those used by Taylor against the Indians in the Second Seminole War. Taylor says here, "When Cuba is Annexed I hope these Foreigners will no longer be imported to annoy the 'Natives' in this way." (The dogs used in Florida were Cuban.) Cass quips, "Ah, Genl. up a spout eh? I am glad that you have found a Platform at last." Taylor was criticized during the campaign for failing to declare a platform. The bloodhounds sniff at his discarded sword. Further right a dead goose lies in the road, and further on a fox, Martin Van Buren, runs toward his burrow at the edge of the forest of "Free Teritory." Van Buren says, "I shall run in safe enough." At the far left Cass ally William A. Marcy stands with his hands in his pockets. He urges on the bloodhounds with, "Help your self to Fox & Geese, but don't 'Worry' the old Genl.' only ascertain his whereabouts.'" Marcy is identified by the "50 cents" trouser patch on his seat. (See "Executive Marcy and the Bambers," no. 1838-5.) The goose was used throughout the 1844 and 1848 campaigns as a symbol of incumbent President James K. Polk.|Lith. & pubd. by H.R. Robinson, 31 Park Row N. York. (Adjoining Lovjoy's Hotel, & Directly Opposite the Park Fountain.)|Signed with initials: W.J.C.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 96.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1848-35 .

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Grant To Hayes - I Guess That Reform Bait Wont Work This Side. Better Try and Anti-Catholic Worm
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A crude but charming comic send-up of 1876 Republican campaign strategy. Democratic candidate Samuel J. Tilden and an unidentified man stand fishing on the left bank of a river, their basket overflowing with their catch. On the opposite bank stand Rutherford B. Hayes and Republican incumbent Ulysses S. Grant, obviously less successful. Grant advises Hayes, "I guess that reform bait won't work this side. Better try an anti-Catholic worm." Since both the Democratic and Republican platforms in 1876 stressed reform, Hayes's campaign sought to stir up anti-Catholic prejudice against Tilden.|Copyrighted and Pub'd by P. Jesse 116 Nassau St. N.Y.|Signed: F.G. Del.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1876-7.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Know Nothing Polka Dedicated To Everybody By Nobody
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A sheet music cover illustrated with the American nativist device of an eye in an aureole of light. The watchful eye (a commonplace in Masonic iconography) here symbolizes the Know Nothings' vigilance against "foreign influence" in American politics and government. For an earlier instance of the nativist use of this motif see the certificate of the Order of United Americans (no. 1848-1).|Entered . . . 1854 by J. Couenhoven. |Philadelphia James Couenhoven 162 Chesnut St.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1854-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Honor To Washington. A National Ode
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An elaborate emblem to the memory of George Washington, illustrating the cover of a song in his honor composed by B. A. Burditt. The song, according to the text, was written "Expressly for the celebration of the 83d Anniversary of American Independence, and performed before the City Authorities of Boston, in the Music Hall, July 4th 1859." It is dedicated to former Massachusetts senator Edward Everett, whose public speeches in support of the Union made him a prominent figure during the antebellum period. His nationalistic oration on George Washington was particularly well-known. In May 1860 Everett was chosen the vice presidential nominee of the Constitutional Union party. A central roundel portrait of Washington in Roman toga is surrounded by military paraphernalia. These include a tricornered hat, a saber, and epaulets (below), rifles and cannonballs (right), and a cannon with broken wheels (left). Also below is a pen and inkstand with the Declaration of Independence. The roundel's laurel-wreath frame is flanked by rows of American flags. Above the portrait is an allegorical vignette, with the figures of Peace (left) and Liberty (right). Peace supports a shield decorated with stars and stripes, and bestows a wreath on the American eagle, who stands at left holding a streamer ("E Pluribus Unum"), arrows, and an olive banch. Liberty or Columbia holds a sword and points upward. Before her, on the ground, lies a sheathed sword. To the right is a railing.|Boston. Published by Oliver Ditson & Co. 277 Washington St.|Entd . . . 1859 by O. Ditson & Co. Mass.|John H. Bufford's Lith. |The Library's copy of the work was deposited for copyright on October 4, 1859.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1859-3.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
Loco Foco Persecution, Or Custom House, Versus Caricatures
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A satire on the publisher's own troubles with the Democratic establishment in New York. In his print shop Henry R. Robinson is confronted by an unidentified man (center, arms crossed) who says, "I am determined this d---d Whig concern shall be shut up till after the Election." The man may be city surveyor and inspector Eli Moore. Robinson, standing with his back to a stove and holding a purse marked "$141," thumbs his nose and retorts, "Does Jesse Hoyt [Democratic strongman and collector of the port] know you're out?" The Custom House was the center of Democratic political control in New York. Robinson, a Whig, apparently ran afoul of the Democrats by his caricatures of Governor William L. Marcy. Marcy had recently been widely criticized for his handling of the Bamber case (see "Executive Mercy/Marcy and the Bambers," no. 1838-5). Two newsboys on the left ask, "Have you got any more of the Bamber Caricatures?" and "I want some more of your Whig Caricatures." Two men stand at the right, waiting to serve a notice of "Distress for Rent in Arrear." One of them says, "I'm afraid we sha'nt get our Rent." A shop clerk watches from behind the counter.|Drawn by "HD" (Henry Dacre?) or Edward Williams Clay.|Mention of the Bamber caricatures and recently appointed Collector Jesse Hoyt places "Loco Foco Persecution" in late 1838 or early 1839. Attribution to HD is based on the print's stylistic similarity to his "Specie Claws" (no. 1838-14), although the main figures seem to be drawn by a superior hand (possibly E.W. Clay).|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St: 11 1/2 Wall & 38 Chatham St. N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 51.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1838-8.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
Jackson Delegate Ticket. No "favored Few, Booted and Spurred, Ready To Ride Us Legitimately By The Grace of God"
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Election ticket with Democratic slate for governor and other Virginia state offices. The vignette illustration includes the seal of the state of Virginia with an eagle and cornucopiae. Below the vignette is the motto; "No bargain, sale or management--no war, famine, pestilence or scourge--no safe precedents. Right of Instruction." It continues at the bottom, "No sectional interests, Justice and equality to all--and hˆü_ˆüąonor and gratitude to the man who has filled the measure of his country's glory.'"|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1828-12.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
The Commander-In-Chief Conciliating The Soldier's Votes On The Battle Field
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A bitterly anti-Lincoln cartoon, based on slanderous newspaper reports of the President's callous disregard of the misery of Union troops at the front. The story that Lincoln had joked on the field at Antietam appeared in the "New York World." Holding a plaid Scotch cap (see "Abraham's Dream--"Coming Events Cast Their Shadows Before,"" no. 1864-42), Lincoln stands on the battlefield at Antietam, which is littered with Union dead and wounded. He instructs his friend Marshal Lamon, who stands with his back toward the viewer and his hand over his face, to "sing us PĚ_Ąicayune Butler,' or something else that's funny."|Signed with monogram: CAL?|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Century, p. 110-111.|Lorant, p. 263.|Weitenkampf, p. 141.|Wilson, p. 292-293.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1864-30.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/13/2013
The First Great Western Empire: Or, The United States of America
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A patriotic broadside illustrated with emblems of the United States composed chiefly of typographic elements. A large central framework incorporates a small "Temple of Freedom" surmounted by a small Liberty figure, and containing the words "The Federal Constitution." On each side are oval bust portraits of Presidents (left to right) Washington, Adams, Jefferson, and Madison. Above them are small vignettes representing (on the left) Agriculture and Domestic Manufactures, the "immoveable pillars of the Independence of our country," and (on the right) Commerce, "a strong support to our national edifice." In the upper section of the framework are the seal of the United States and a listing of the names of the seventeen states with their 1810 census figures. Various quotations and brief texts are included, the longest of which are an account of George Washington's resignation of his commission, a description of the geography, government, and people of the United States, and the song "Columbia" written by "Dr. Dwight, President of Yale College."|Entered . . . the Fifteenth Day of January, 1812, by Jonathan Clark, of Albany, New-York.|Printed by and for the Authors, at the Press of R. Packard, no. 51 State-Street, Albany.|The broadside is purported to be the eighth edition, of June 1812, and "Executed with American Materials."|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1812-1.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013
First Candidate Out For President of The United States In 1876
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Copyright 1875 by J.W. Shiveley, Alexandria, Va. Endicott & Co. Lith. 57 Beekman St. N.Y.|Promotional print published to advertize a pamphlet, Lectures by the first candidate out for President of the United States in 1876 / by J.W. Shiveley of Alexandria, Virigina.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Date Added:
06/08/2013