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CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.11: Structuring Data
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In this lesson, students go further into the collection and interpretation of data, including cleaning and visualizing data. Students first look at the how presenting data in different ways can help people to understand it better, and they then create visualizations of their own data. Using a the results of a preferred pizza topping survey, students must decide what to do with data that does not easily fit into the visualization scheme that they have chosen. Finally, students look at which parts of this process can be automated by a computer and which need a human to make decisions.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.12: Making Decisions with Data
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In this lesson students get practice making decisions with data based on some problems designed to be familiar to middle school students. Students work in groups discussing how they would use the data presented to make a decision before the class discusses their final choices. Not all questions have right answers and in some cases students can and should decide that they should collect more data. The lesson concludes with a discussion of how different people could draw different conclusions from the same data, or how collecting different data might have affected the decisions they made.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.13: Interpreting Data
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Students begin the lesson by looking at a cake preference survey that allows respondents to specify both a cake and an icing flavor. They discuss how knowing the relationship between cake and icing preference helps them better decide which combination to recommend. They are then introduced to cross tabulation, which allows them to graph relationships to different preferences. They use this technique to find relationships in a preference survey, then brainstorm the different types of problems that this process could help solve.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.14: Automating Data Decisions
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In this lesson students look at a simple example of how a computer could be used to complete the decision making step of the data problem solving process. Students are given the task of creating an algorithm that could suggest a vacation spot. Students then create rules, or an algorithm, that a computer could use to make this decision automatically. Students share their rules and what choices their rules would make with the class data. They then use their rules on data from their classmates to test whether their rules would make the same decision that a person would. The lesson concludes with a discussion about the benefits and drawbacks of using computers to automate the data problem solving process.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.15: Project - Make a Recommendation
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To conclude this unit, students design a recommendation engine based on data that they collect and analyze from their classmates. After looking at an example of a recommendation app, students follow a project guide to complete this multi-day activity. In the first several steps, students choose what choice they want to help the user to make, what data they need to give the recommendation, create a survey, and collect information about their classmates' choices. They then interpret the data and use what they have learned to create the recommendation algorithm. Last, they use their algorithms to make recommendations to a few classmates. Students perform a peer review and make any necessary updates to their projects before preparing a presentation to the class.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.1: Problem Solving with Big Data
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In this lesson, students look at how data is collected and used by organizations to solve problems in the real world. The lesson begins with a quick review of the data problem solving process they explored in the last lesson. Then students are presented three scenarios that could be solved using data and brainstorm the types of data they would want to solve them and how they could collect the data. Each problem is designed to reflect a real-world service that exists. After brainstorming, students watch a video about a real-world service and record notes about what data is collected by the real-world service and how it is used. At the end of the lesson, students record whether data was provided actively by a user, was recorded passively, or is collected by sensors.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.1: Representation Matters
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In the first lesson of the data unit, students get an overview of what data is and how it is used to solve problems. Students start off with a brief discussion to come to a common understanding of data. They then split into groups and use a data set to make a series of meal recommendations for people with various criteria. Each group has the choices of meal represented in a different way (pictures, recipes, menu, nutrition) that gives an advantage for one of the recommendations. Afterwards, groups compare their responses and discuss how the different representations of the meal data affected how the students were able to solve the different problems.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.2: Patterns and Representation
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In this lesson students create their own system for representing information. They begin by brainstorming all the different systems they already use to represent yes-no responses. They then work in small groups to create a system that can represent any letter in the alphabet using only a single stack of cards. The cards used have one of 6 different possible drawings (6 animals, 6 colors, etc.) and so to represent the entire alphabet students will need to use patterns of multiple cards to represent each letter. Students create messages with their systems and exchange with other groups to ensure the system worked as intended. In the wrap-up discussion the class reviews any pros and cons of the different systems. They discuss commonalities between working systems and recognize that there are many possible solutions to this problem and what's important is that everyone use the same arbitrary system to communicate.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.3: ASCII and Binary Representation
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In this lesson students learn to use their first binary system for encoding information, the ASCII system for representing letters and other characters. At the beginning of the lesson the teacher introduces the fact that computers must represent information using either "on" or "off". Then students are introduced to the ASCII system for representing text using binary symbols. Students practice using this system before encoding their own message using ASCII. At the end of the lesson a debrief conversation helps synthesize the key learning objectives of the activity.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.4: Representing Images
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In this lesson students learn how computers represent images. To begin the lesson they consider the challenge of turning all the complexity of vision into a binary pattern. Through a series of images showing how this transformation is made students are introduced to the concept of splitting images into squares or "pixels" which can then be turned on or off individually to make the entire image. Students then do a short set of challenges using the Pixelation Widget in order to draw black and white images. Puzzles are designed to call out some of the challenges of representing images in this way. In the wrap up students make connections between the system for representing images and the system for representing text they learned in the previous lesson.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.5: Representing Numbers
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In this lesson, students learn about the binary number system. With a set of cards that represent the place values in a binary (base-2) number system by a collection of dots, students turn bits "on" or "off" by turning cards face up and face down, then observe the numbers that result from these different patterns. Eventually, students extend the pattern to a generic 4-bit system.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.6: Keeping Data Secret
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Students have a discussion on the different levels of security they would like for personal data. Once the class has developed an understanding of the importance of privacy, they learn about the process of encrypting information by enciphering a note for a partner and deciphering the partner's note. The class concludes with a discussion about the importance of both physical and digital security.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.7: Combining Representations
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In this lesson, students use all three types of binary representation systems (ASCII characters, binary number, and images) to decode information in a record. After seeing a series of bits and being asked to decode them, students are introduced to the idea that in order to understand binary information, they must understand both the system that is being used and the meaning of the information encoded. They then decode a record representing a pet based on a given structure.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.8: Create a Representation
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In this lesson students design a structure to represent their perfect day using the binary representation systems they've learned in this chapter. Students will first write a short description of their perfect day and then review with a partner to identify the key pieces of information they think a computer could capture. As a class students will decide how a punch card of bytes of information will be interpreted to represent those pieces of information. Students will then use the ASCII, binary number, and image formats they have learned to represent their perfect days. Students then trade punch cards and try to decode what the other student's perfect day is like. The lesson ends with a reflection.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Data and Society Lesson 5.9: Problem Solving and Data
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In this lesson, students use the problem solving process from earlier in the course to solve a data problem. After reviewing the process, the class is presented with a decision: whether a city should build a library, pet shelter, or fire department. Students work in teams to collect information on the Internet to help them decide what should be built, then use this information build an argument that will convince the city council of their choice. They then map what they have done to the problem solving process that they have been using throughout the course, comparing the general problem solving process to its specific application to data problems.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.11: Booleans and Conditionals
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Students start by using booleans to compare the current value of a sprite property with a target value, using that comparison to determine when a sprite has reached a point on the screen, grown to a given size, or otherwise reached a value using the counter pattern. After using booleans directly to investigate the values or sprite properties, students add conditional _if_ statements to write code that responds to those boolean comparisons.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.12: Conditionals and User Input
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Following the introduction to booleans and _if_ statements in the previous lesson, students are introduced to a new block called `keyDown()` which returns a boolean and can be used in conditionals statements to move sprites around the screen. By the end of this lesson students will have written programs that take keyboard input from the user to control sprites on the screen.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.13: Other Forms of Input
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In this lesson students continue to explore ways to use conditional statements to take user input. In addition to the simple `keyDown()` command learned yesterday, students will learn about several other keyboard input commands as well as ways to take mouse input.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.14: Project - Interactive Card
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In this cumulative project for Chapter 1, students plan for and develop an interactive greeting card using all of the programming techniques they've learned to this point.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.15: Velocity
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After a brief review of how they used the counter pattern to move sprites in previous lessons, students are introduced to the properties that set velocity and rotation speed directly. As they use these new properties in different ways, they build up the skills they need to create a basic side scroller game.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.16: Collision Detection
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Students learn about collision detection on the computer. Working in pairs, they explore how a computer could use sprite location and size properties and math to detect whether two sprites are touching. They then use the `isTouching()` block to create different effects when sprites collide, including playing sounds. Last, they use their new skills to improve the sidescroller game that they started in the last lesson.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.17: Complex Sprite Movement
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Students learn to combine the velocity properties of sprites with the counter pattern to create more complex sprite movement. In particular students will learn how to simulate gravity, make a sprite jump, and allow a sprite to float left or right. In the final levels of the Code Studio progression students combine these movements to animate and control a single sprite and build a simple game in which a character flies around and collects a coin. Students are encouraged to make their own additions to the game in the final level.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.18: Collisions
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Students program their sprites to interact in new ways. After a brief review of how they used the `isTouching` block, students brainstorm other ways that two sprites could interact. They then use `isTouching` to make one sprite push another across the screen before practicing with the four collision blocks (`collide`, `displace`, `bounce`, and `bounceOff`).

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.19: Functions
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Students learn how to create functions to organize their code, make it more readable, and remove repeated blocks of code. An unplugged warmup explores how directions at different levels of detail can be useful depending on context. Students learn that higher level or more abstract steps make it easier to understand and reason about steps. Afterwards students learn to create functions in Game Lab. They will use functions to remove long blocks of code from their draw loop and to replace repeated pieces of code with a single function. At the end of the lesson students use these skills to organize and add functionality to the final version of their side scroller game.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.1: Booleans Unplugged
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In this lesson, students are introduced to boolean values and logic, as well as conditional statements. The class starts by playing a simple game of Stand Up, Sit Down in which the boolean (true/false) statements describe personal properties (hair or eye color, clothing type, age, etc). This gets students thinking about how they can frame a property with multiple potential values (such as age) with a binary question.

From there students are provided a group of objects with similar, yet varying, physical properties. With a partner they group those objects based on increasingly complex boolean statements, including compound booleans with AND and OR.

Finally we reveal Conditionals as a tool to make decisions or impact the flow of a program using boolean statements as input.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.1: Programming for Entertainment
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Students are asked to consider the "problems" of boredom and self expression, and to reflect on how they approach those problems in their own lives. From there, students will explore how Computer Science in general, and programming specifically, plays a role in either a specific form of entertainment or as a vehicle for self expression.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.21: Using the Game Design Process
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In this multi-day lesson, students use the problem solving process from Unit 1 to create a platform jumper game. They start by looking at an example of a platform jumper, then define what their games will look like. Next, they use a structured process to plan the backgrounds, variables, sprites, and functions they will need to implement their game. After writing the code for the game, students will reflect on how the game could be improved, and implement those changes.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.22: Project - Design a Game
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Students will plan and build their own game using the project guide from the previous two lessons to guide their project. Working individually or in pairs, students will first decide on the type of game they'd like to build, taking as inspiration a set of sample games. They will then complete a blank project guide where they will describe the game's behavior and scope out the variables, sprites, and functions they'll need to build. In Code Studio, a series of levels prompts them on a general sequence they can use to implement this plan. Partway through the process, students will share their projects for peer review and will incorporate feedback as they finish their game. At the end of the lesson, students will share their completed games with their classmates. This project will span multiple classes and can easily take anywhere from 3-5 class periods.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.2: Plotting Shapes
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Students explore the challenges of communicating how to draw with shapes and use a tool that introduces how this problem is approached in Game Lab. The warm up activity quickly demonstrates the challenges of communicating position without some shared reference point. In the main activity students explore a Game Lab tool that allows students to interactively place shapes on Game Lab's 400 by 400 grid. They then take turns instructing a partner how to draw a hidden image using this tool, accounting for many challenges students will encounter when programming in Game Lab. Students optionally create their own image to communicate before a debrief discussion.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.2: The Game Design Process
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This lesson introduces students to the process they will use to design games for the remainder of the unit. This process is centered around a project guide which asks students to define their sprites, variables, and functions before they begin programming their game. In this lesson students begin by playing a game on Game Lab where the code is hidden. They discuss what they think the sprites, variables, and functions would need to be to make the game. They are then given a completed project guide which shows one way to implement the game. Students are then walked through this process through a series of levels. As part of this lesson students also briefly learn to use multi-frame animations in Game Lab. At the end of the lesson students have an opportunity to make improvements to the game to make it their own.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.3: Drawing in Game Lab
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Students are introduced to Game Lab, the programming environment for this unit, and begin to use it to position shapes on the screen. They learn the basics of sequencing and debugging, as well as a few simple commands. At the end of the lesson, students will be able to program images like the ones they made with the drawing tool in the previous lesson.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.4: Shapes and Randomization
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In this lesson students continue to develop their familiarity with Game Lab by manipulating the width and height of the shapes they use to draw. The lesson kicks off with a discussion that connects expanded block functionality (e.g. different sized shapes) with the need for more block inputs, or "parameters". Students learn to draw with versions of `ellipse()` and `rect()` that include width and height parameters. They also learn to use the `background()` block. At the end of the progression students are introduced to the `randomNumber()` block. Combining all of these skills students will draw a randomized rainbow snake at the end of the lesson.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.5: Variables
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In this lesson students learn how to use variables to label a number in their program or save a randomly generated value. Students begin the lesson with a very basic description of the purpose of a variable. Students then complete a level progression that reinforces the model of a variable as a way to label or name a number. Students use variables to save a random number to see that variables actually store or save their values, allowing them to use the same random number multiple times in their programs.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.6: Sprites
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In order to create more interesting and detailed images, students are introduced to the sprite object. Every sprite can be assigned an image to show, and sprites also keep track of multiple values about themselves, which will prove useful down the road when making animations.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.7: The Draw Loop
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In this lesson students are introduced to the draw loop, one of the core programming paradigms in Game Lab. To begin the lesson students look at some physical flipbooks to see that having many frames with different images creates the impression of motion. Students then watch a video explaining how the draw loop in Game Lab helps to create this same impression in their programs. Students combine the draw loop with random numbers to manipulate some simple animations with dots and then with sprites. At the end of the lesson students use what they learned to update their sprite scene from the previous lesson.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.8: Counter Pattern Unplugged
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Students explore the underlying behavior of variables through an unplugged activity. Using notecards and string to simulate variables within a program, students implement a few short programs. Once comfortable with this syntax, students use the same process with sprite properties, tracking a sprite's progress across the screen.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Interactive Animations and Games Lesson 3.9: Sprite Movement
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By combining the Draw Loop and the Counter Pattern, students write programs that move sprites across the screen, as well as animate other sprite properties.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.11: Making Music
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In this lesson students will use the buzzer to its full extent by producing sounds, notes, and songs with the buzzer. Students start with a short review of the buzzer's frequency and duration parameters, then move on to the concept of notes. Notes allow students to constrain themselves to frequencies that are used in Western music and provide a layer of abstraction that helps them to understand which frequencies might sound good together. Once students are able to play notes on the buzzer, they use arrays to hold and play sequences of notes, forming simple songs.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.12: Arrays and For Loops
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Using a _for loop_ to iterate over all of the elements in an array is a really useful construct in most programming languages. In this lesson, students learn the basics of how a _for loop_ can be used to repeat code, and then combine it with what they've already learned about arrays to write programs that process all elements in an array. Students use for loops to go through each element in a list one at a time without having to write code for each element. Towards the end of the lesson students will apply this with the `colorLed` list on the board to create an app that changes all of the LEDs each time a button is clicked.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.13: Accelerometer
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In this lesson, students will explore the accelerometer and its capabilities. They’ll become familiar with its events and properties, as well as create multiple programs utilizing the accelerometer similar to those they’ve likely come across in real world applications.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.14: Functions with Parameters
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The lesson starts with a quick review of parameters, in the context of App Lab blocks that they students have seen recently. Students then look at examples of parameters within user-created functions in App Lab and create and call functions with parameters for themselves, using them to control multiple elements on a screen. Afterwards, students use for loops to iterate over an array, passing each element into a function. Last, students use what they have learned to create a star catching game.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.15: Circuits and Physical Prototypes
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In preparation for this chapter's final project, students will learn how to develop a prototype of a physical object that includes a Circuit Playground. Using a modelled project planning guide, students will learn how to wire a couple of simple circuits and to build prototypes that can communicate the intended design of a product, using cheap and easily found materials such as cardboard and duct tape.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.16: Project - Prototype an Innovation
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In this final project for the course, students team to develop and test a prototype for an innovative computing device based on the Circuit Playground. Using the inputs and outputs available on the board, groups will create programs that allow for interesting and unique user interactions.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.1: Arrays and Color LEDs
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An array is an ordered collection of items, usually of the same type. In this lesson, students learn ways to access either a specific or random value from a list using its index. They then learn how to access the colorLEDs array that controls the behavior of the color LEDs on the Circuit Playground. Students will control the color and intensity of each LED, then use what they have learned to program light patterns to create a light show on their Circuit Playground.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.1: Innovations in Computing
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To kick off the final unit of this course, students will do some research into interesting innovations in computing. This lesson will expose students to wider variety of computing form factors (what a computer looks like) and fields that are impacted by computing. Later in this unit students will look back on the devices they encountered in this lesson as they develop their own physical computing devices.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.2: Designing Screens with Code
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In Unit 4 students learned a very simple approach to app development in App Lab that required a separate screen for most interactions. To expand the kinds of apps that students can make, and to encourage them to think in new ways about how users interact with apps, we introduce the `setProperty()` block. This command can be used to set the content and properties of various UI elements, allowing students to write programs that update information on a single screen, instead of manually creating duplicate screens. In this lesson students build up simple apps that only require a single screen, the content of which is changed using `setProperty()`.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.3: The Circuit Playground
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In this lesson students get their first opportunity to write programs that use the Circuit Playground. After first inspecting the board visually and hypothesizing possibly functionalities, students move online where they will learn to write applications that control an LED. By combining App Lab screens with the Circuit Playgrounds, students can gradually start to integrate elements of the board as an ouput device while relying on App Lab for user input.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.4: Input Unplugged
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In preparation for delving deeper into programming with App Lab, students will explore how a handful of different programs written in both Game Lab and App Lab handle taking input from the user. After comparing and contrasting the approaches they saw in the example apps, students group up to act out the two different models for input (conditionals in an infinite loop and asynchronous events) to gain a better understanding of how they work.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.5: Board Events
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This lesson transitions students from consider the Circuit Playground as strictly an output device towards using it as a tool for both input and output. Starting with the hardware buttons and switch,sing the hardware buttons and switch, students learn to use `onBoardEvent()`, analogously to `onEvent()`, in order to take input from their Circuit Playgrounds.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.6: Getting Properties
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This lesson introduces students to the `getProperty` block, which allows them to access the properties of different elements with code. Students first practice using the block to determine what the user has input in various user interface elements. Students later use `getProperty` and `setProperty` together with the counter pattern to make elements move across the screen. A new screen element, the slider, and a new event trigger, `onChange`, are also introduced.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.7: Analog Input
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In this lesson, students explore how the three analog sensors (sound, light, and temperature) can be used to write programs that respond to changes in the environment. The use of these sensors marks a transition in terms of how users interact with a program. By using sensors as an input, the user of an app doesn't have to directly interact with it at all, or may interact without actually realizing they are doing so.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.8: The Program Design Process
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This lesson introduces students to the process they will use to design programs of their own throughout this unit. This process is centered around a project guide which asks students to sketch out their screens, identify elements of the Circuit Playground to be used, define variables, and describe events before they begin programming. This process is similar to the Game Design Process that we used in Unit 3. In this lesson students begin by playing a tug o' war style game where the code is hidden. They discuss what they think the board components, events, and variables would need to be to make the program. They are then given a completed project guide which shows one way to implement the project. Students are then walked through this process through a series of levels. At the end of the lesson students have an opportunity to make improvements to the program to make it their own.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Physical Computing Lesson 6.9: Project - Make a Game
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Students take what they've learned through chapter one, and develop an app of their own design that uses the board to output information.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Problem Solving Lesson 1.1: Intro to Problem Solving
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In this lesson, students work in groups to design aluminum foil boats that will support as many pennies as possible. Groups have two rounds to work on their boats, with the goal of trying to hold more pennies than they did in round 1. The structure of the activity foreshadows different steps of the problem solving process that students will be introduced to in more detail in the following lesson. At the end of the lesson students reflect on their experiences with the activity and make connections to the types of problem solving they will be doing for the rest of the course.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Problem Solving Lesson 1.2: The Problem Solving Process
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This lesson introduces the formal problem solving process that students will use over the course of the year, Define - Prepare - Try - Reflect. The lesson begins by asking students to brainstorm all the different types of problems that they encounter in everyday life. Students are then shown the four steps of the problem solving process and work together to relate these abstract steps to their actual experiences solving problems. First students relate these steps to the aluminum boats problem from the previous lesson, then a problem they are good at solving, then a problem they want to improve at solving. At the end of the lesson the class collects a list of generally useful strategies for each step of the process to put on posters that will be used throughout the unit and year.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Problem Solving Lesson 1.3: Exploring Problem Solving
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In this lesson students apply the problem solving process to three different problems in order to better understand the value of each step. They will solve a word search, arrange seating for a birthday party, and plan a trip. The problems grow increasingly complex and poorly defined to highlight how the problem solving process is particularly helpful when tackling these types of problems. The lesson concludes with students reflecting on their experience with the problem solving process. They will justify the inclusion of each step and will brainstorm questions or strategies that can help them better define open-ended problems, as this is often the most critical step.

This lesson will likely take two class periods or more to complete. The first two problems may fit into a single class period but the third will need to be moved to a second day.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Problem Solving Lesson 1.4: What is a Computer?
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In this lesson students develop a preliminary definition of a computer. To begin the lesson, the class will brainstorm possible definitions for a computer and place the results of this brainstorm on the board. Next, students will work in groups to sort pictures into “is a computer” or “is not a computer” on poster paper. Groups will place their posters around the room and briefly explain their motivations for choosing some of their most difficult categorizations. The teacher will then introduce a definition of the computer and allow students to revise their posters according to the new definition.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Problem Solving Lesson 1.5: Input and Output
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In this lesson students consider a number of computing devices to determine what types of inputs and outputs they use. Groups are assigned to a computing device and based on a teacher-provided definition of input and output, list the inputs and outputs of their device. Earlier in the activity students are prompted to focus on more obvious physical inputs and outputs (e.g. a keyboard as an input or a screen as an output) but later discussions lead students to consider less obvious examples (e.g. that a touch screen is both an input and output, or the fact that the Internet can serve as both input and output). Throughout the lesson the teacher records inputs and outputs that are identified on a T-Chart at the front of the room. To conclude the lesson students examine common activities they do on a computing device and select the inputs and outputs used for that activity from the chart.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Problem Solving Lesson 1.6: Processing
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Students complete two unplugged card sorting activities to explore the meaning of processing and its relationship to problem-solving. The first activity has few constraints and is used to introduce a high-level definition of processing. The next introduces more constraints that force students to develop an algorithm that will always successfully process the cards. Students iteratively develop, test, and share their algorithms with classmates. A wrap-up discussion has students reflect on the different types of problem-solving they used in these activities and the value of producing an algorithm to solve a problem.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019
CS Discoveries 2019-2020: Problem Solving Lesson 1.7: Apps and Storage
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This lesson reviews the input, output, storage, and processing aspects of a computer in a context that is relevant and familiar to students: apps. In pairs, students evaluate smartphone applications to analyze the specific problems that they were designed to solve, the inputs that they need to work, and the processing that turns those inputs into the desired output, and what information they would want to store for later. The class concludes with a discussion that connects the lesson to apps students are more familiar with.

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Code.org
Provider Set:
CS Discoveries 2019-2020
Date Added:
09/10/2019