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23 Things for Digital Knowledge
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23 Things is a suite of 23 self-paced online modules that cover a range of topics from video editing to basic coding. Each module or 'thing' consists of information, interactive activities, and invitations to try out various open and free software applications and technologies. The modules have been created using H5P and can be downloaded individually as a single H5P file, modified and re-used under a CC-BY-SA licence - simply click on the 'reuse' link at the bottom of each module.

The content was created by Curtin University students as part of a 'students as partners' project.

Subject:
Information Science
Electronic Technology
Educational Technology
Higher Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Interactive
Author:
Curtin University Library
Date Added:
12/04/2020
3D Modelling with Processing
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CC BY-SA
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This workshop covers the basics of 3D modelling in Processing. From the 3D coordinate system, placing different shapes, surfaces, and camera angles. This introductory workshop is suitable for all students with some basic Processing knowledge. We assume that you are familiar with 2D shapes in Processing,  including pushMatrix, rotate and translate. This workshop will only cover basics, sufficient to create a landscape with 3D objects and a moving object. 

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Ansgar Fehnker
Date Added:
03/02/2021
ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education at MCC
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The Framework, re-framed in "plain English" for students and faculty. The goal was to make the ACRL Framework easier to understand (many people don't use iterative in everyday conversation, for example) and to make the connection between information literacy and institutional mission/vision and learning outcomes clear.

Cover photo by geraldo stanislas on Unsplash

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Reading
Student Guide
Author:
Deb Baker
Date Added:
11/20/2020
AER Newsletter: Summer 2019
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CC BY
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Welcome to the first, biannual Archival Educators Roundtable (AER) Newsletter! In 2016, the Rockefeller Archive Center (RAC) brought together like-minded professionals who use primary sources for public programming, outreach, and education, and the AER was born. As archival education is a still-developing field, the AER created a community where people could share their successes, challenges, and works in progress through casual workshops.AER’s network of educators, archivists, and archival education allies has since expanded its culture of support beyond the biannual meetings here at the RAC through social media, event attendance, joint publications, and email correspondence.It is our hope that this AER Newsletter will further extend the table, so speak, reaching more colleagues as we spotlight educators, and showcase the projects, challenges, and successes of archival education. Just as the aim of AER meetings is to ensure that all perspectives on primary source education are honored, we encourage you, our dedicated AER audience, to reach out and contribute your insights to future AER Newsletters! Many thanks to our first issue's contributors--we couldn't have done it without you.--Marissa Vassari, Archivist and Educator, Rockefeller Archive CenterElizabeth Berkowitz, Outreach Program Manager, Rockefeller Archive Center

Subject:
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Education
Elementary Education
Higher Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
The Rockefeller Archive Center
Date Added:
01/23/2020
A+ Exam and Brain Dumps: Guide to the A+ Certification Exam (01:03)
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Should A+ Certification Exam candidates use brain dump sites? My answer, might surprise you.

This is part of Mr. Ford's Guide to the A+ Certification Exam: How to Be A Computer Technician.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Mr. Ford's Class
Author:
Scott Ford
Date Added:
12/13/2014
AIRS - Advanced Information Research Skills
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CC BY-NC-SA
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AIRS is an open source set of online modules and resources in research skills and knowledge. It provides the grounding in research processes with practical tools to support you.

AIRS is a mandatory coursework requirement for Higher Degree Research (HDR) students enrolled in a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) or Master of Philosophy (MPhil), at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT).

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Full Course
Interactive
Reading
Provider:
Queensland University of Technology Library
Author:
Queensland University of Technology Library
Date Added:
01/20/2021
Academic Library Information Literacy Modules
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Literacy modules designed for an embedded use in second semester, college freshman-level English or Composition courses.  All content available through website.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Author:
Kelly Drifmeyer
Date Added:
02/05/2022
Access Matters
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Information is inherently valuable. Access to it, or lack of access, has the potential to affect the quality of one’s life. In this lesson, students will learn how access to information shapes people’s lives and how they can make informed decisions related to access to information in their lives and in their communities.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Module
Provider:
New Literacies Alliance
Author:
Ashley Flinn
Cristina Colquhoun
Eric Kowalik
Heather Collins
Heather Healy
Joelle Pitts
Matt Upson
Melia Fritch
New Literacies Alliance
Date Added:
08/20/2021
Access, Power, & Privilege: A Toolkit at the Intersections of Scholarly Communication and Information Literacy
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This faculty and librarian toolkit is designed to support teaching at the intersections of scholarly communication and information literacy. The heart of the toolkit is a choose-your-own scenario activity which can be used in a flipped classroom setting or in a traditional classroom. The choose-your-own scenario activity is inspired by and adapts questions from: Hare, S. & Evanson, C. (2018). Information privilege outreach for undergraduate students. College and Research Libraries. http://crl.acrl.org/index.php/crl/article/view/16767. Please note the survey questions are provided below, however, the survey skip logic is not included in the PDF, we recommend the link for the full experience. We also include talking points for librarians and instructors and include ways to modify the activity for students publishing information within their disciplines or for lower-division general education courses.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Community of Online Research Assignments
Author:
Carolyn Caffrey Gardner
Date Added:
11/05/2020
Accessibility Case Studies for Scholarly Communication Librarians and Practitioners
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CC BY
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The goal of this resource is to support scholarly communication librarians wanting to implement accessibility measures in their open access, open education, and open data initiatives.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Talea Anderson
Date Added:
06/17/2021
Accessibility, Disability, & Copyright
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CC BY
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These materials are intended to be used both in graduate courses related to copyright or accessibility and by practitioners interested in learning more on the topic. Topics covered include the Chafee Amendment and how it has changed post-Marrakesh Treaty, the role of accessibility in the Authors Guild, Inc. v. HathiTrust decision, the importance of the Marrakesh Treaty for international efforts to make materials accessible across borders, and how licensing provisions can impact these various rights. The resources include videos explaining the key points of each topic, along with editable slide decks for those who wish to build on the existing materials, activities and options for assignments, recommended pre-class readings, discussion prompts, and related resources for those who want to learn more on the topics introduced in this OER module. There are also teaching notes for those interested in using the module in a class they are teaching.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Module
Author:
Carli Spina
Date Added:
06/03/2021
Remix
Activity: Cognitive Styles End-of-Term Reflection
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CC BY
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What are your facet values when using software? What's one situation when your facet values might change? How did identifying your facet values affect your understanding of how you use software?

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Lara Letaw
GenderMag Project
Date Added:
11/16/2021
Activity: Cognitive Styles Reflection
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CC BY
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What are your facet values when using software? What's one situation when your facet values might change? How did identifying your facet values affect your understanding of how you use software?

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Lara Letaw
GenderMag Project
Date Added:
11/15/2021
Activity: Cognitive Styles Reflection (Team/Project)
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CC BY
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What cognitive styles do you use to interact with technology? PRE-REQ: https://www.oercommons.org/courseware/lesson/87536 LAST UPDATE: Changed title

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Information Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Lara Letaw
GenderMag Project
Date Added:
11/06/2021
Remix
Activity: Cognitive Styles Reflection with GenderMag Personas
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CC BY
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Reflection assignment about cognitive styles used to interact with technology. Includes reflection questions about relating to the GenderMag personas.

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Lara Letaw
GenderMag Project
Date Added:
11/15/2021
Advanced Analytic Methods in Geospatial Intelligence
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General James Clapper, former United States Director of National Intelligence and the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), once said \everything happens somewhere.\" He stressed that there are aspects of time and place to every intelligence problem. In this course, you will examine how time and place work with general intelligence techniques to create geospatial intelligence. You will learn and apply critical thinking skills, structured analytical techniques, and other intelligence methods in a geospatial context. You'll also learn how to reduce personal and organizational bias by conducting an Analysis of Competing Hypotheses, by R. Heuer, a 45-year veteran of the CIA. As a result, you will be better prepared for the world of geospatial intelligence analysis."

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences
Author:
Dennis Bellafiore
Todd Bacastow
Date Added:
10/07/2019
African American History Online
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Videos that show how to use African American History Online, a database provided by Shelton State Community College to its students.All videos are close captioned.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Kelly Griffiths
Date Added:
05/28/2019
Altmetrics Bingo
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CC BY
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Introduce graduate students and faculty in any discipline to the world of altmetrics and new ways to evaluate engagement with scholarly publications. The intention is to show not only new measurement techniques but to walk the learners through how to present their work in venues that will increase the visibility of their ideas and scholarly output.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Game
Author:
Kathryn Gannon
Nora Bird
Date Added:
04/21/2022
Altmetrics: What They Are and How They Can Be Used
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CC BY
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Altmetrics are the descriptive data that can be used in addition to bibliometrics (e.g., CiteScore, Journal Impact Factor) that describe a work's impact. This 15-minute workshop gives 3 commonly used altmetrics, and how others can be found.

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Higher Education
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Kristy Padron
Date Added:
11/22/2020
Analyzing Institutional Publishing Output: A Short Course
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CC BY
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This short course provides training materials about how to create a set of publication data, gather additional information about the data through an API (Application Programming Interface), clean the data, and analyze the data in various ways. Developing these skills will assist academic librarians who are:

Negotiating a renewal of a journal package or an open access publishing agreement,
Interested in which journals the institution's authors published in or which repositories the institution’s authors shared their works in,
Looking to identify publications that could be added to your repository,
Searching for authors who do or do not publish OA for designing outreach programs, or
Tracking how open access choices have changed over time.
After completing the lessons, the user will be able to gain an understanding of an institution’s publishing output, such as number of publications per year, open access status of the publications, major funders of the research, estimates of how much funding might be spent towards article processing charges (APCs), and more. The user will also be better prepared to think critically about institutional publishing data to make sustainable and values-driven scholarly communications decisions.

The course is presented in two sections. Section 1 describes how to build a dataset. Section 2 describes a free, open source tool for working with data. Examples of how to do analyses both in OpenRefine and Microsoft Excel are provided.

This short course was created for the Scholarly Communication Notebook. The file "Analyzing Institutional Publishing Output-A Short Course.docx" serves as a table of contents for the materials.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Allison Langham-Putrow
Ana Enriquez
Date Added:
03/23/2022
Android:Kotlin/Everywhere
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CC BY-SA
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Welcome to the Android developer guides. The documents listed in the left navigation teach you how to build Android apps using APIs in the Android framework and other libraries.

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Information Science
Career and Technical Education
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Peeyush pareek
Date Added:
08/28/2019
Anteprima del volume "I BACINI CULTURALI E LA PROGETTAZIONE SOCIALE ORIENTATA ALL’HERITAGE-MAKING, TRA POLITICHE GIOVANILI, INNOVAZIONE SOCIALE, DIVERSITÀ CULTURALE"
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Anteprima del volume "I BACINI CULTURALI E LA PROGETTAZIONE SOCIALE ORIENTATA ALL’HERITAGE-MAKING, TRA POLITICHE GIOVANILI, INNOVAZIONE SOCIALE, DIVERSITÀ CULTURALE. Il framework del Progetto ABACUS – Attivazione dei Bacini Culturali Siciliani, alla luce della Convenzione Quadro del Consiglio d'Europa sul valore del Patrimonio culturale per la società"

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Computer Science
Environmental Science
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Languages
Performing Arts
World Cultures
Management
Public Relations
Agriculture
Education
History
Law
Hydrology
Physical Geography
Social Science
Anthropology
Archaeology
Political Science
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Interactive
Primary Source
Simulation
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Author:
ABACUS Project Activation of Cultural Basins
Date Added:
12/22/2020
Análisis y visualización de datos usando Python
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CC BY
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Python es un lenguaje de programación general que es útil para escribir scripts para trabajar con datos de manera efectiva y reproducible. Esta es una introducción a Python diseñada para participantes sin experiencia en programación. Estas lecciones pueden enseñarse en un día (~ 6 horas). Las lecciones empiezan con información básica sobre la sintaxis de Python, la interface de Jupyter Notebook, y continúan con cómo importar archivos CSV, usando el paquete Pandas para trabajar con DataFrames, cómo calcular la información resumen de un DataFrame, y una breve introducción en cómo crear visualizaciones. La última lección demuestra cómo trabajar con bases de datos directamente desde Python. Nota: los datos no han sido traducidos de la versión original en inglés, por lo que los nombres de variables se mantienen en inglés y los números de cada observación usan la sintaxis de habla inglesa (coma separador de miles y punto separador de decimales).

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
The Carpentries
Author:
Alejandra Gonzalez-Beltran
April Wright
chekos
Christopher Erdmann
Enric Escorsa O'Callaghan
Erin Becker
Fernando Garcia
Hely Salgado
Juan Martín Barrios
Juan M. Barrios
Katrin Leinweber
Laura Angelone
Leonardo Ulises Spairani
LUS24
Maxim Belkin
Miguel González
monialo2000
Nicolás Palopoli
Nohemi Huanca Nunez
Paula Andrea Martinez
Raniere Silva
Rayna Harris
rzayas
Sarah Brown
Silvana Pereyra
Spencer Harris
Stephan Druskat
Trevor Keller
Wilson Lozano
Date Added:
08/07/2020
App GeoSensor
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CC BY-NC-ND
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O aplicativo GeoSensor é o produto técnico da dissertação de mestrado intitulada: App GeoSensor, Geotecnologias Aplicadas ao Ensino das Ciências Ambientais, apresentada ao Programa de Pós-Graduação em Rede Nacional para Ensino das Ciências Ambientais – Profciamb, núcleo UFPA. O app foi concebido como uma forma de disseminar conhecimentos em Geotecnologias, de maneira didática e acessível, além de fazer paralelo com conhecimentos de disciplinas curriculares, como matemática, física e química, de modo a servir como incentivo ao Ensino de Ciências Ambientais, despertando o interesse dos alunos, utilizando exemplos de aplicações práticas de conceitos vistos em sala de aula, além de possibilitar aos educadores demonstrar as aplicações do conhecimento obtido em sala na vida de todos.
O aplicativo foi desenvolvido tendo como público-alvo discentes e docentes do ensino médio, com possibilidades de aplicação também a partir do ensino fundamental 2, bem como em níveis técnico e superior.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Information Science
Educational Technology
Atmospheric Science
Geology
Hydrology
Physical Geography
Physics
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Author:
João Paulo Abreu Almeida
Date Added:
01/17/2022
Applications of ICT in Libraries
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The Advanced Certificate and the Advanced Diploma in Applications of ICT in Libraries permit library staff to obtain accreditation for their skills in the use of ICT. Anyone can make use of the materials and assessment is available in variety of modes, including distance learning.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Wikibooks
Date Added:
05/13/2016
Apprenticechip - A course on case studies in and techniques for creating digital libraries for apprentice learners
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Apprenticechip is a course on case studies in and techniques for creating digital libraries for apprentice learners.

The goals of this course are: 1. Learn a 10 step approach to digital library design, creation, curation, operation and evaluation. 2. Through the lens of this 10 step approach, review case studies of over 20 digital libraries of various sizes, encompassing a variety of disciplines, addressing diverse missions, utilizing a variety of technologies and learn how they succeeded and failed. 3. Use this 10 step approach to create your own small digital library to help apprentice learners in your area of professional expertise or personal passion.

We also wish to provide an introduction to digital libraries and to explore the questions 1) What is the history of digital libraries and learning? 2) What is the future of digital libraries and learning? 3) How can we create digital libraries that help apprentice learners? and 4) What role do professional + amateur librarians have to play in the future of digital libraries and learning?

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Author:
Michael P. D'Alessandro M.D.
Date Added:
09/07/2016
ArcGIS StoryMaps
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This is an introduction to the classic version of ArcGIS StoryMaps. It provides a walkthrough of the website functions and has tasks listed for students to build their first story map.

Subject:
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Higher Education
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
Community of Online Research Assignments
Author:
Justin de la Cruz
Date Added:
12/08/2020
Archival Preservation Handouts
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CC BY
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In this resource, you will find five archival preservation handouts and one handout addressing arrangement and description. These handouts will quickly help a user understand how to best preserve different types of materials at their home. There are both full-color and black and white versions of each of these handouts. The handouts are licensed under CC, by 4.0. 

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Marissa Ajamian Grossman
Date Added:
05/03/2021
Archiving for the Future: Simple Steps for Archiving Language Documentation Collections
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CC BY-SA
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Archiving for the Future is a free training course designed to teach language documenters, activists, and researchers how to organize, arrange, and archive language documentation, revitalization, and maintenance materials and metadata in a digital repository or language archive. Then entire course can be completed in approximately 3-5 hours.

This course was developed by the staff of the Archive of the Indigenous Languages of Latin America at the University of Texas at Austin in consultation with representatives of various DELAMAN (https://www.delaman.org/) archives and other digital data repositories in the United States, the United Kingdom, the European Union, Australia, and Cameroon.

The course material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. BCS-1653380 (September 1, 2016 to August 31, 2020). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Subject:
Information Science
Languages
Anthropology
Ethnic Studies
Linguistics
Material Type:
Full Course
Interactive
Author:
Alicia Niwagaba
Elena Pojman
Ryan Sullivant
Susan Smythe Kung
Date Added:
11/05/2020
Articulate Storyline Information Literacy Modules by Marquette University Raynor Memorial Libraries
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Covering necessary information literacy topics in a traditional "one shot" session can be difficult. To address this challenge, a suite of interactive online modules were developed to provide active learning lessons on various information literacy topics. The modules can be used in fully online, flipped or face-to-face courses and can be integrated into a learning management system (LMS) so student knowledge and progress can be tracked and assessed.

Developed using Articulate Storyline, the sources files are available as open source downloads under a GNU General Public License (GPLv3). Please feel free to download and continue to enhance and improve these modules.

Subject:
Information Science
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Interactive
Module
Author:
Eric Kowalik
Date Added:
11/12/2021
Ask the Right Questions
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CC BY-NC-SA
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When looking for information, one of the first steps is to develop a research question to figure out the scope of what exactly is needed. In this lesson, students will explore what it takes to narrow a search in order to find the best information.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Module
Provider:
New Literacies Alliance
Author:
Alice Anderson
Ashley Stark
Heather Collins
Joelle Pitts
Melia Fritch
New Literacies Alliance
Date Added:
08/20/2021
Assessing Visual Materials for Diversity & Inclusivity
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource is a modification of the Washington Models for the Evaluation of Bias Content in Instructional Materials (2009) that is made available through OER Commons under a public domain license. This resource attempts to both update the content with more contemporary vocabulary and also to narrow the scope to evaluating still images as they are found online. It was developed as a secondary project while working on a BranchED OER grant during summer 2020. It includes an attached rubric adapted from the Washington Model (2009).

Subject:
Information Science
Visual Arts
Education
Educational Technology
Higher Education
Material Type:
Assessment
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Kimberly Grotewold
Date Added:
07/03/2020
Assessing data availability and research reproducibility in hydrology and water resources
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CC BY
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There is broad interest to improve the reproducibility of published research. We developed a survey tool to assess the availability of digital research artifacts published alongside peer-reviewed journal articles (e.g. data, models, code, directions for use) and reproducibility of article results. We used the tool to assess 360 of the 1,989 articles published by six hydrology and water resources journals in 2017. Like studies from other fields, we reproduced results for only a small fraction of articles (1.6% of tested articles) using their available artifacts. We estimated, with 95% confidence, that results might be reproduced for only 0.6% to 6.8% of all 1,989 articles. Unlike prior studies, the survey tool identified key bottlenecks to making work more reproducible. Bottlenecks include: only some digital artifacts available (44% of articles), no directions (89%), or all artifacts available but results not reproducible (5%). The tool (or extensions) can help authors, journals, funders, and institutions to self-assess manuscripts, provide feedback to improve reproducibility, and recognize and reward reproducible articles as examples for others.

Subject:
Information Science
Physical Science
Hydrology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Scientific Data
Author:
Adel M. Abdallah
David E. Rosenberg
Hadia Akbar
James H. Stagge
Nour A. Attallah
Ryan James
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) Resources
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CC BY
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ARDC curate a collection of resources for researchers, librarians and eResearch professionals. The topics covered by resources and guides range from ethics and sensitive data to managing data; from research data policy and licensing to training and teaching research data management skills.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Primary Source
Author:
Australian Research Data Commons
Date Added:
06/24/2022
Author Carpentry
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CC BY-SA
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Author Carpentry is a researcher-to-researcher training and outreach program in open authoring and publishing. It was initiated at the Caltech Library to enhance scientific authorship and publishing in the digital age. The aim of Author Carpentry is to promote and support good information handling tools, practices, and skills that help researchers prepare, submit, and publish contributions that add value to the scholarly record and invite others to adapt and build upon. Ideally, that means contributions that fulfill not only the original Big Four of the scholarly record – Registration, Validation, Dissemination, and Preservation - but also enable an essential fifth component of knowledge management in the digital age: Replication, Reuse, and Remixing.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Date Added:
11/08/2020
Automation and Make
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CC BY
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A Software Carpentry lesson to learn how to use Make Make is a tool which can run commands to read files, process these files in some way, and write out the processed files. For example, in software development, Make is used to compile source code into executable programs or libraries, but Make can also be used to: run analysis scripts on raw data files to get data files that summarize the raw data; run visualization scripts on data files to produce plots; and to parse and combine text files and plots to create papers. Make is called a build tool - it builds data files, plots, papers, programs or libraries. It can also update existing files if desired. Make tracks the dependencies between the files it creates and the files used to create these. If one of the original files (e.g. a data file) is changed, then Make knows to recreate, or update, the files that depend upon this file (e.g. a plot). There are now many build tools available, all of which are based on the same concepts as Make.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Measurement and Data
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
The Carpentries
Author:
Adam Richie-Halford
Ana Costa Conrado
Andrew Boughton
Andrew Fraser
Andy Kleinhesselink
Andy Teucher
Anna Krystalli
Bill Mills
Brandon Curtis
David E. Bernholdt
Deborah Gertrude Digges
François Michonneau
Gerard Capes
Greg Wilson
Jake Lever
Jason Sherman
John Blischak
Jonah Duckles
Juan F Fung
Kate Hertweck
Lex Nederbragt
Luiz Irber
Matthew Thomas
Michael Culshaw-Maurer
Mike Jackson
Pete Bachant
Piotr Banaszkiewicz
Radovan Bast
Raniere Silva
Rémi Emonet
Samuel Lelièvre
Satya Mishra
Trevor Bekolay
Date Added:
03/20/2017
Avoiding Plagiarism
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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PowerPoint presentation on avoidance of plagiarism and associated tools. This resource should be accessible and includes captioning, as well as narration transcript within notes. Conversion to MP4 format can be found with the following link: https://1drv.ms/v/s!Au0Iieak3rI_0FzvLimwqLC6KUxo?e=Np6bCL.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Lynda M. Redden
Date Added:
07/12/2021
Backups, Archives & Data Preservation
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Public Domain
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There are several important elements to digital preservation, including data protection, backup and archiving. In this lesson, these concepts are introduced and best practices are highlighted with case study examples of how things can go wrong. Exploring the logistical, technical and policy implications of data preservation, participants will be able to identify their preservation needs and be ready to implement good data preservation practices by the end of the module.

Subject:
Information Science
Higher Education
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
DataONE
Author:
DataONE Community Engagement & Outreach Working Group
Date Added:
11/21/2020
Bad News Game
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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The content of both the Dutch and the English-language version of Bad News was
written by DROG (www.aboutbadnews.com), a Dutch organisation working against
the spread of disinformation, in collaboration with researchers at Cambridge
University in the United Kingdom. The visual and graphic design was done by
Gusmanson (www.gusmanson.nl).

Subject:
Information Science
Journalism
Education
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Provider:
DROG
Date Added:
07/13/2021
Remix
Be Internet Awesome Website Guidance
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CC BY
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This guide walks you through the "Be Internet Awesome" Digital Citizenship games and curriculum created by Google for grades 2-6 (although older students might also enjoy the games). The games are extremely engaging and can be played on their own--or accompanied by their corresponding lessons. The lesson plans provide everything educators need to begin teaching this content in their classrooms

Subject:
Information Science
Communication
Electronic Technology
Material Type:
Game
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Author:
Lesley James
Date Added:
11/17/2021
Be Internet Citizens
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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In 2017, the ISD launched Be Internet Citizens in partnership with Google and YouTube, delivering in-school workshops and teacher training in schools across the UK. Our aim is to build young people’s resilience to online harms - including disinformation and hate speech - and empower them to become positive, accountable and conscientious leaders online.

Subject:
Information Science
Education
Educational Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Module
Provider:
Institute for Strategic Dialogue
Date Added:
07/13/2021
Becoming a Leader through Action Research: Building Open Education Practice in the School Library
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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The role of the school librarian is evolving from keeper of library materials to leader in school reform. The digital age has elevated  information literacy from the mechanics of searching and finding to thinking and inquiry. To meet this challenge the library facility is reconceptualized as a learning environment and the collection as a dynamic process of curation and access. Library staff, including paraprofessionals, student peers, and parent volunteers are viewed as instructional support. Allocated budgets are supplemented by funding sources such as grants and donations. The school librarian, trained in Action Research, can realize the library as learning center as she systematically collects evidence, sets priorities, and constructs a Strategic Plan. This module brings together the processes of action research, including identifying a problem in practice, formulating a research question, collecting and analyzing data to conduct a Community Scan and School Library Needs Assessment. She will apply her findings to building a Strategic Plan that will transform the school library into a learning center, or improve its existing functions.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
carol gordon
Date Added:
09/18/2016
Begin Your Research
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CC BY-NC
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Begin Research“Where Do I Start?”Do you have an assignment to write a research paper but you’re not sure where to start? Take a deep breath and begin by carefully reading the assignment requirements. This will help you understand the work you need to do.First, let’s think about what we mean when we say “research.”HOW MUCH DO YOU ALREADY KNOW?What makes a good topic?It is broad enough that you can find enough information on the subject.It is focused enough that you are not overwhelmed with too much information.The topic is interesting to you.All of the above.If you don’t know much about your topic, what resources would be most helpful when you being your research?Encyclopedias and websitesScholarly articlesNewspapers and magazinesStatistical informationIt is always a good idea to brainstorm different words for similar ideas when you first begin to research your topic.TrueFalseWhat statement below is generally true about beginning research?It is pretty easy to find information on any topic.As long as you have a good topic, researching for it will not take a long time.No matter t he assignment, good research takes time and effort.None of the above.ANSWERSAll of the above.2.1True4.3Read Your Assignment CarefullyBefore you can even begin your research, though, you need to read the assignment instructions carefully—more than once! This will help you understand the work you need to do.Highlight topic guidelines, required length, and the types of information sources allowed.Let’s take a look at a sample assignment.UNDERSTAND YOUR ASSIGNMENTLily is taking a University Studies class and must complete this assignment:In this paper, you will analyze the scientific aspects of a known environmental problem and identify and discuss at least two proposed solutions.Now, analyze this assignment step by step.Find the words that tell you what to do (think verbs!): analyze, identify, and discuss.Find the limits of the assignment: scientific aspects and two proposed solutions.Find the key theme: a known environmental problemBy reading the assignment carefully, we know that Lily has to analyze an environmental problem and identify and discuss at least two proposed solutions.Pick a Good TopicLily’s assignment is broad enough to give her some choices when picking a topic. So, what makes a good topic?It interests you! You’ll enjoy it and do a better job.It meets the requirements of your assignment.It’s broad enough to give you several search options.It’s focused enough that you’re not overwhelmed with information.HOT TIP!Explore the library’s databases to get you started.Browse newspapers and news sources.Talk to your instructors and fellow students.Consult with a librarian.TOO BROAD, TOO NARROW, OR JUST RIGHT?Air pollution in urban areasToo broadToo narrowJust rightRespiratory diseases in children in high-density urban areasToo broadToo narrowJust rightEnvironmental consequences of California’s October 2007 forest firesToo broadToo narrowJust rightPolar bear adaptation to global warming in the ArcticToo broadToo narrowJust rightRenewable energy in the United StatesToo broadToo narrowJust rightThe design and implementation of Cal-Cars—the California Cars InitiativeToo broadToo narrowJust rightANSWERSToo broad. You’d need to identify an aspect of air pollution to narrow down the scopeJust right! This is a good topic. You’ll continue to refine your ideas as you learn more about the topic.A bit narrow. It will be hard to find information on just one event. Look more broadly for information on forest fires in California or the West.Just right. There should be just enough information to get you started. You will continue to refine your ideas as you learn more about the topic.Too broad. This is a good starting place, but you’d want to focus the topic by selecting a specific renewable energy like solar power or wind.Too narrow. It’s going to be difficult to find information on such a narrow topic. Broaden the focus to look at initiatives like this one that are less regional.Identify Potential IdeasNow it’s time to really focus your topic. Browse a few resources for ideas and identify different aspects of the topic.Remember, if you pick a subject that interests you, you’ll enjoy the research process much more!Customize Your TopicLet’s say your assignment is to research an environmental issue. This is a broad starting point, which is a normal first step.One way to customize your topic is to consider how different disciplines approach the same topic in different ways. For example, here’s how your broad topic of “environmental issues” might be approached from different perspectives.Social Sciences: Economics of Using Wind to Produce Energy in the United StatesSciences: Impact of Climate Change on the Habitat of Desert Animals in ArizonaArts and Humanities: Analysis of the Rhetoric of Environmental Protest LiteratureTurn Your Topic into a QuestionWhen you’ve chosen a topic, it’s time to ask some questions. Using “environmental issues” as our general research interest, let’s ask some questions about environmental issues and agriculture.How: How do government agricultural subsidies impact the price of food?  How does the use of pesticides affect food safety?Who: Consumers, farmers, farm workersWhat: Food safety, pesticides, food prices, genetically modified food, organic farmingWhere: United States, developing nations, European UnionWhy: Why does the European Union ban the sale and distribution of genetically modified food?What’s Your Angle?Let’s say that the most interesting question that emerged from the last exercise was: “How does repeated pesticide use in agriculture impact soil and groundwater pollution?”Find Your KeywordsNow that we have our sample research question, we need to identify the key concepts and their related keywords.Using our research question, “How does repeated pesticide use in agriculture impact soil and groundwater pollution?” we might consider these keywords:A SYMPHONY OF SYNONYMSLet’s examine our research question again:How does repeated pesticide use in agriculture impact soil and groundwater pollution?Now analyze this assignment step by step:Find important words and phrases that describe this topic (you can ignore common words that don’t have a lot of meaning, such as prepositions, articles, and adjectives): pesticide, agriculture, soil, and pollution.Now, think of some synonyms for the keywords you found:pesticideagrochemicals, pest management, weed management,diazinan, malathionagriculturefarming, food crops, specific types of cropssoilclay, organic componentsgroundwater watershed, water resources, water table, aquaticspollutionenvironmental impact, degradation, exposure, acid rainWhy are synonyms necessary? You’ll often need to search for different words relating to the same concept.Dive Into a Sea of Resources!Browse through general sources to get familiar with your topic. You will find many sources for locating background information. Remember our point from earlier in this tutorial: the source you select will determine what you find. Make sure you spend your time looking in the right places.HOT TIP!Is there enough info on your topic? If not, review the earlier steps for starting your research. It’s normal to refine and revise your topic multiple times.What Do You Know?Once you’ve established your focused topic, you need to get familiar with it by doing some reading. Start with more general sources and then work up to more specific and detailed sources. Where you go next depends on how much you know.So, just how much do you know about your topic?Not All That MuchI’ve Got the BasicsI’m Ready for DetailsSounds like you need the type of information typically found in encyclopedias and websites.Sounds like you’ve got a basic understanding of your topic and just need to learn more. Check out books, magazines, and newspapers.Specific information is what you need. You’ll want to find relevant scholarly articles, statistical sources, and government publications.Matching Resources to Your Information NeedNewspaper: Current regional or local informationScholarly journal article: Detailed analysis of a complex problem.Book or book chapter: Summary of what is known about a topic.Encyclopedia or website: Factual information like names, dates, and definitions.TEST YOURSELF: WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED?What are the characteristics of a good topic?(Select all that apply) It interests you.It meets the requirements of your assignment.It’s broad enough to give you several search options.It’s focused enough that you’re not overwhelmed with information.Rank the following questions in order from most general to most specific (1 being the most general):Are pesticides bad?Do video games cause violent behavior in adolescent males?Are agricultural workers in Mexico at a higher risk of health problems due to pesticide exposure because of lax government safety standards?Is there a relationship between fast food consumption and obesity?What is the best way to focus  your topic?Think about the discipline that you are researching for.Tailor your topic to the requirements of your assignment.Talk to a librarian about the resources that are available for your topic.All of the above.Pick the best set of keywords to begin searching for information on global warming.Rising ocean levels, air pollution, greenhouse gasesBiodiversity, atmospheric temperature, ozone layerGlobal climate change, greenhouse effect, atmospheric carbon dioxideEnvironment sustainability, alternative energy, biofuelsWhy is it a good idea to use different words to describe similar ideas when you are beginning research?(Select all that apply) Because there is only one right answer and you can find it by trial and error.Because  using different words will help you cast a broader net than just using the same term over and over.Different researchers might use different terms to describe the same idea.You might spell some of the words wrong and not get any results.What is the most difficult aspect of beginning to research a topic that you don’t know very much about?You don’t know enough about the topic to know what is important and what is not.You don’t understand the technical aspects of the topic.It takes a lot of time to do research.All of the above.For you, what the most difficult part about beginning your research?ANSWERSA good topic will incorporate all these characteristics.1 = Are pesticides bad?2 = Is there a relationship between fast food consumption and obesity?3 = Do video games cause violent behavior in adolescent males?4 = Are agricultural workers in Mexico at a higher risk of health problems due to pesticide exposure because of lax government safety standards?The more a research question incorporates the concepts of Who, What, When, Where, Why, and  How the more specific it will be.All of the above.4.3; think carefully about which terms are closely related to global warming.5.2 and 5.3; there may be many ways to describe a single topic. Using as many related words as possible will help you find the most information!All of the above; remember that research takes time and energy and isn’t an easy thing to do!No matter what, coming to the library and talking to a librarian will help you get started. Finding information effectively and efficientlyLevel 2 teaches you how to structure a search for the information you need to write a paper, for example. You will learn the following:how to construct a search strategy using the aspects defined in level 1how to perform a smart search using the information sources available at TU Delft LibraryDetermining search termsNow it is time to do an actual search! In level 1 you divided the search topic into its different aspects. What’s next? Are you going to use Google and type in all the aspects, like you probably do every day? What will you do with all the search results? Are you going to study them all? No, there is a smarter way!Exercise 1Plug in your earphones or turn down the volume and watch the clip ‘Web Search Strategies Explained in Plain English‘ by Commoncraft about smart searching on the web.Searching the web is very similar to searching other information sources such as Worldcat Discovery. Doing the following exercise will teach you how to apply the aspects of your search topic in a smart search. Complete the exercise on how to find suitable search terms matching the aspects of the search topic. Determining search strategyNow you are going to convert the synonyms you have found into a smart search strategy. You have to use search operators to use all the synonyms properly.Exercise 2Study the TUlib module Search operators.If you want to perform a smart search, you must combine your search terms. Complete thisexercise on combining search terms with Boolean operators.Towards information sourcesNow you have formulated a search strategy, which you will use to search the various information sources. But where to start? How do you choose which information source you want to use? This table gives an overview of the differences between Worldcat Discovery, Scopus and Google Scholar and helps you determine when to use each one.Exercise 3Watch the first two sections (“Basic searching” and “Retrieving documents”) of this video about searching in WorldCat Discovery (which includes the TU Delft Library catalogue).Watch this video with an example of a search strategy carried out in article database Scopus.Complete the exercise on carrying out your search strategy in various information sources.Now you have learned how to convert the aspects of your search topic into a search strategy and how to apply this strategy in a number of information sources.You can find other relevant information sources for your subject area in the “Useful links” overview in the section “What’s next”.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Mark McBride
Date Added:
11/17/2016
A Beginner's Guide to Information Literacy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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A Beginner's Guide to Information Literacy covers the ACRL's Framework for Information Literacy frame by frame, using casual language and real world examples. Use this click-through text-based resource to understand the Framework as a whole or to work on understanding a particular Frame. Reflection questions are included for the casual learner or for anyone incorporating Information Literacy conversations into a classroom or workshop.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Module
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Emily Metcalf
Date Added:
07/14/2021
A Beginners Guide to Information Literacy and ACRL Framework
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This guide covers each concept included in the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, a document created by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL). The goal of this guide is to break down the basic concepts and put them in accessible, digestible language so students can think critically about information and how we use it.

Subject:
Information Science
Education
Higher Education
Material Type:
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
WILLIAM PERRENOD
Date Added:
06/17/2022
Being a Reviewer or Editor for Registered Reports
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Experienced Registered Reports editors and reviewers come together to discuss the format and best practices for handling submissions. The panelists also share insights into what editors are looking for from reviewers as well as practical guidelines for writing a Registered Report. ABOUT THE PANELISTS: Chris Chambers | Chris is a professor of cognitive neuroscience at Cardiff University, Chair of the Registered Reports Committee supported by the Center for Open Science, and one of the founders of Registered Reports. He has helped establish the Registered Reports format for over a dozen journals. Anastasia Kiyonaga | Anastasia is a cognitive neuroscientist who uses converging behavioral, brain stimulation, and neuroimaging methods to probe memory and attention processes. She is currently a postdoctoral researcher with Mark D'Esposito in the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute at the University of California, Berkeley. Before coming to Berkeley, she received her Ph.D. with Tobias Egner in the Duke Center for Cognitive Neuroscience. She will be an Assistant Professor in the Department of Cognitive Science at UC San Diego starting January, 2020. Jason Scimeca | Jason is a cognitive neuroscientist at UC Berkeley. His research investigates the neural systems that support high-level cognitive processes such as executive function, working memory, and the flexible control of behavior. He completed his Ph.D. at Brown University with David Badre and is currently a postdoctoral researcher in Mark D'Esposito's Cognitive Neuroscience Lab. Moderated by David Mellor, Director of Policy Initiatives for the Center for Open Science.

Subject:
Computer Science
Information Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Center for Open Science
Author:
Center for Open Science
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Best Practice: Document steps used in data processing
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
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Different types of new data may be created in the course of a project, for instance visualizations, plots, statistical outputs, a new dataset created by integrating multiple datasets, etc. Whenever possible, document your workflow (the process used to clean, analyze and visualize data) noting what data products are created at each step. Depending on the nature of the project, this might be as a computer script, or it may be notes in a text file documenting the process you used (i.e. process metadata). If workflows are preserved along with data products, they can be executed and enable the data product to be reproduced.

Subject:
Information Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
DataONE
Date Added:
03/28/2022