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Acoma polychrome water jar
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Acoma polychrome water jar, c. 1890, from Acoma, clay and pigment, 25.1 x 29.8 cm (The Metropolitan Museum of Art); speaker: Brian Vallo, Director, Indian Arts Research Center School for Advanced Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Art History
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Khan Academy
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
After the Fall: The Conservation of Tullio Lombardo's "Adam"
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Conservators, scientists, and curators tell the story behind the unprecedented conservation of Tullio Lombardo's Adam. The life-size marble statue of Adam, carved by Tullio Lombardo (Italian, ca. 1455–1532), is among the most important works of art from Renaissance Venice to be found outside that city today. Made in the early 1490s for the tomb of Doge Andrea Vendramin, it is the only signed sculpture from that monumental complex. The serene, idealized figure, inspired by ancient sculpture, is deceptively complex. Carefully manipulating composition and finish, Tullio created God's perfect human being, but also the anxious victim of the serpent's wiles. In 2002, Adam was gravely damaged in an accident. Committed to returning it to public view, the Museum undertook a conservation treatment that has restored the sculpture to its original appearance to the fullest extent possible. The exhibition allows Adam to be viewed in the round and explains this unprecedented twelve-year research and conservation project. It also inaugurates a new permanent gallery for Venetian and northern Italian sculpture. The installation of this gallery was made possible by Assunta Sommella Peluso, Ignazio Peluso, Ada Peluso, and Romano I. Peluso.

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Art History
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Khan Academy
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Allan Houser, “Earth Song”
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Chiricahua Apache artist Allan Houser’s “Earth Song” is the signature sculpture on display at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, AZ. Created in 1979 from Alabama marble, it depicts an Apache man singing a song of respect, a prayer to Mother Earth. Houser is considered the Grandfather of Contemporary Native American Sculpture for creating works that are grounded in a respect for all indigenous cultures. Discover more reasons why “Earth Song” is a masterpiece with David Roche, Dickey Family Director and CEO of the Heard Museum. Video by Bank of America. Created by Smarthistory.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Anishinaabe shoulder bag
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Anishinaabe, possibly Mississauga Ojibwa, Shoulder bag (missing strap), c. 1800, tanned leather, porcupine quills, dye, glass beads, silk ribbon, metal cones, and deer hair, Possibly made in Ontario, Canada; possibly made in Michigan, United States; possibly made in Wisconsin, United States, 30.5 × 22.9 cm (The Metropolitan Museum of Art). Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Khan Academy
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
An Art of Attraction: The Electrotyping Process
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Tiffany and Company’s famous Bryant Vase was meticulously crafted by highly skilled artisans­­—among them, Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Eugene J. Soligny—who worked the silver for more than a year. Curator Ellenor Alcorn describes how Tiffany then used the fascinating nineteenth-century process of electrotyping to create presentation copies. View this work on metmuseum.org. Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Art History
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Khan Academy
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Blake, The Parable of the Wise and Foolish Virgins
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Met curator Constance McPhee on outsiders in William Blake’s The Parable of the Wise and Foolish Virgins, c. 1799–1800. Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Bronze statue of Eros sleeping
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Met curator Seán Hemingway on the purity of love in Bronze statue of Eros sleeping from Greece’s Hellenistic Period, 3rd–2nd century B.C.E. The Hellenistic period introduced the accurate characterization of age. Young children enjoyed great favor, whether in mythological form, as baby Herakles or Eros, or in genre scenes, playing with each other or with pets. This Eros, god of love, has been brought down to earth and disarmed, a conception considerably different from that of the powerful, often cruel, and capricious being so often addressed in Archaic poetry. One of the few bronze statues to have survived from antiquity, this figure of a plump baby in relaxed pose conveys a sense of the immediacy and naturalistic detail that the medium of bronze made possible. He is clearly based on firsthand observation. The support on which the god rests is a modern addition, but the work originally would have had a separate base, most likely of stone. This statue is the finest example of its kind. Judging from the large number of extant replicas, the type was popular in Hellenistic and, especially, Roman times. In the Roman period, Sleeping Eros statues decorated villa gardens and fountains. Their function in the Hellenistic period is less clear. They may have been used as dedications within a sanctuary of Aphrodite or possibly may have been erected in a public park or private, even royal, garden.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/04/2021
By hammer and fire: Goldmaking techniques of the ancient Colombians
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By hammer and fire (a martillo y fuego), Goldmaking techniques of the ancient Colombians © Trustees of the British Museum. Created by British Museum.

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Art History
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Byzantine Mosaic of a Personification, Ktisis
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Evan Freeman, PhD and Anne McClanan, PhD discuss a Byzantine mosaic of a personification of Ktisis/Foundation, now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Acc. 1999.99). CC BY 4.0.

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Art History
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Khan Academy
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/09/2021
Calder, Mobile
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Met curator Marla Prather on motion in Alexander Calder’s Mobile, 1941. Alexander Calder was born to a family of sculptors. His grandfather, Alexander Milne Calder (1846-1923), studied with Thomas Eakins and is famous for the elaborate sculptural decorations of Philadelphia's City Hall. Calder himself had studied to be an engineer at the Stevens Institute of Technology before attending the Art Students League in New York. Like many aspiring artists of his generation, Calder then spent time in Paris where he was inspired by Joan Miró's work and absorbed the playfulness of Dada. Indeed, it was the French artist Marcel Duchamp who christened Calder's hanging sculptures "mobiles." For works such as this one, Calder cut sheet metal into various shapes and assembled these elements in a chain-linked system so that the flat metal pieces move in response to currents of air. This particular mobile was included in the 1942 exhibition "Artists for Victory" at the Metropolitan where the sculpture committee awarded it a prize and recommended it be added to the collection. Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Art History
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Khan Academy
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Carrie Bethel, Basket bowl
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Join Gaylord Torrence and Brian Vallo for a closer look at, and in-depth commentary on, a selection of highlights in the exhibition Art of Native America: The Charles and Valerie Diker Collection. The exhibition is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation, the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund, the Enterprise Holdings Endowment, and the Walton Family Foundation. The Metropolitan Museum of Art is situated in Lenapehoking, the homeland of Lenape peoples, and respectfully acknowledges their ongoing cultural and spiritual connections to the area. Credits Editor: Sarah Cowan Producer: Melissa Bell Audio: David Raymond Photography: Eileen Travell Music: Austin Fisher. Archival images Carrie Bethel, Courtesy Yosemite National Park Archives, Museum, and Library © 2018 The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Art History
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Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Conserving Cuzco School Paintings
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Follow the conservation treatment and research of “Emblem of Folly,” a painting from colonial Cuzco. This is one of ten paintings in the Cuzco School style that were recently gifted to The Met as part of the Museum’s effort to collect works from colonial Latin America. José Luis Lazarte Luna, Assistant Conservator in Paintings Conservation, who was born and raised in Lima, Peru, says that conservation can “shine a light on those communities or artists that have not had the focus before.” These paintings have many unknowns, from the identities of their Indigenous makers to the materials they used. Committed study of these works can help create a better understanding of Latinx cultural identity and history.

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Art History
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Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Conserving Everhard Jabach and His Family
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"What does it take to revive a masterwork?" Michael Gallagher on conserving Charles Le Brun's Everhard Jabach and His Family Charles Le Brun (French, 1619–1690). Everhard Jabach (1618–1695) and His Family, ca. 1660. Oil on canvas; 110 1/4 x 129 1/8 in. (280 x 328 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Mrs. Charles Wrightsman Gift, in honor of Keith Christiansen, 2014 (2014.250) http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/the-collection-online/search/626692 MetCollects introduces highlights of works of art recently acquired by the Met through gifts and purchases. Discover a new work each month. http://www.metmuseum.org/collection/metcollects Credits Director: Christopher Noey Producer and Editor: Kate Farrell Camera: Sarah Cowan, Kate Farrell, Lisa Rifkind Design: Natasha Mileshina Music: Austin Fisher Explore more on MetMedia: http://www.metmuseum.org/metmedia/video.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Conserving Velázquez's Portrait of Philip IV
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The "Portrait of Philip IV" by Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez (1599-1660) returned recently from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, having been cleaned for the first time in more than sixty years. The gleaming silver brocade covering the king's crimson coat is executed in an extraordinarily free and spontaneous manner, which is almost unparalleled in the painter's production and can now be better appreciated. The treatment by Michael Gallagher, Sherman Fairchild Conservator in Charge of Paintings Conservation, revealed the dazzling original surface that had been veiled by a yellowing varnish. Additionally, the first technical studies of the painting were undertaken, involving microscopy, X-radiography, and infrared reflectography.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Conserving the Emperors Carpet
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The magnificent sixteenth-century Emperor's Carpet from Safavid Iran was acquired by the Metropolitan Museum in 1941, but its condition was so fragile that it was only displayed for public twice over the next sixty years. This video documents the ambitious three-year conservation program that was launched in 2006 to stabilize the condition of the carpet so its lustrous wools and dazzling colors can be displayed the Museum on a regular basis. Related lesson plan: http://www.metmuseum.org/learn/for-educators/lesson-plans-and-pre-visit-guides/venice-and-the-islamic-world

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Art History
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Khan Academy
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Cylinder seal and modern impression: nude bearded hero wrestling with a water buffalo; bull-man wrestling with lion
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Met curator Yelena Rakic on reading into Cylinder seal and modern impression: nude bearded hero wrestling with a water buffalo; bull-man wrestling with lion from Mesopotamia, c. 2250–2150 B.C.E. . Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/04/2021
Depletion gilding: Goldmaking techniques of the ancient Colombians
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Depletion gilding (dorado por oxidación). The gold-making techniques of the ancient Colombians. © Trustees of the British Museum. Created by British Museum.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Early Photography: making daguerreotypes
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The daguerreotype is a one-of-a-kind, highly detailed photographic image on a polished copper plate coated with silver. It was introduced in 1839 and became the first popular photographic medium. Created by Getty Museum.

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Art History
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Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
From wax to metal: Goldmaking techniques of the ancient Colombians
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From wax to metal (de la cera al metal), Goldmaking techniques of the ancient Colombians © Trustees of the British Museum. Created by British Museum.

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Art History
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Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Headdress (Cheyenne or Lakota)
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Video by the Minneapolis Institute of Art. Headdress, late 19th–Early 20th century, Tsitsistas (Cheyenne) or Lakota Artist, bald eagle and other feathers, wool, buffalo and cow hide, horse hair, beads and pigments (Minneapolis Institute of Art). Created by Smarthistory.

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Art History
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Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Head of Tutankhamun from the Amarna Period of Egypt’s New Kingdom
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Met curator Nicholas Reeves on fragmented history in Head of Tutankhamun from the Amarna Period of Egypt’s New Kingdom, c. 1336–1327 B.C.E. This head is a fragment from a statue group that represented the god Amun seated on a throne with the young king Tutankhamun standing or kneeling in front of him. The king's figure was considerably smaller than that of the god, indicating his subordinate status in the presence of the deity. All that remains of Amun is his right hand, which touches the back of the king's crown in a gesture that signifies Tutankhamun's investiture as king. During coronation rituals, various types of crowns were put on the king's head. The type represented here—probably a leather helmet with metal disks sewn onto it—was generally painted blue, and is commonly called the "blue crown." The ancient name was khepresh. Statue groups showing a king together with gods had been created since the Old Kingdom, and formal groups relating to the pharaoh's coronation were dedicated at Karnak by Hatshepsut and other rulers of Dynasty 18. The Metropolitan's head of Tutankhamun with the hand of Amun is special because of the intimacy with which the subject is treated. The face of the king expresses a touching youthful earnestness, and the hand of the god is raised toward his crown with gentle care.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/04/2021
Hippopotamus
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Met curator Isabel Stünkel on precaution in Hippopotamus dating from Egypt’s Middle Kingdom, c. 1961–1878 B.C.E. This well-formed statuette of a hippopotamus (popularly called "William") demonstrates the Egyptian artist's appreciation for the natural world. It was molded in faience, a ceramic material made of ground quartz. Beneath the blue-green glaze, the body was painted with the outlines of river plants, symbolizing the marshes in which the animal lived. The seemingly benign appearance that this figurine presents is deceptive. To the ancient Egyptians, the hippopotamus was one of the most dangerous animals in their world. The huge creatures were a hazard for small fishing boats and other rivercraft. The beast might also be encountered on the waterways in the journey to the afterlife. As such, the hippopotamus was a force of nature that needed to be propitiated and controlled, both in this life and the next. This example was one of a pair found in a shaft associated with the tomb chapel of the steward Senbi II at Meir, an Upper Egyptian site about thirty miles south of modern Asyut. Three of its legs have been restored because they were purposely broken to prevent the creature from harming the deceased. The hippo was part of Senbi's burial equipment, which included a canopic box (also in the Metropolitan Museum), a coffin, and numerous models of boats and food production.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/04/2021
Homer, Northeaster
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Met curator H. Barbara Weinberg on the power of nature in Winslow Homer’s Northeaster, 1895; reworked by 1901. Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Inka ushnus: landscape, site and symbol in the Andes
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For three years, a research team from the British Museum, the University of Reading, Royal Holloway University of London and the Universidad Nacional de San Cristobal de Huamanga set out to discover how the Inca Empire used a stone platform known as an ushnu as a symbol of political power. By enhancing our knowledge of how ushnus were built, their symbolism, what activities took place on them and what artifacts might be found around them, the project has increased our understanding of Inca culture and how they conquered the Andes to become one of the world’s most successful civilisations. © Trustees of the British Museum. Created by British Museum.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Jan Gossart - Conservation Discoveries
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Gossart was among the first northern artists to travel to Rome to make copies after antique sculpture and introduce historical and mythological subjects with erotic nude figures into the mainstream of northern painting. Most often credited with successfully assimilating Italian Renaissance style into northern European art of the early sixteenth century, he is the pivotal Old Master who changed the course of Flemish art from the Medieval craft tradition of its founder, Jan van Eyck (c. 1380/90--1441), and charted new territory that eventually led to the great age of Peter Paul Rubens (1577--1640).

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Art History
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Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
07/29/2021
Johns, White Flag
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Met curator Ian Alteveer on reticence in Jasper Johns’s White Flag, 1955. "White Flag" is the largest of his flag paintings and the first in which the flag is presented in monochrome. By draining most of the color from the flag but leaving subtle gradations in tone, the artist shifts our attention from the familiarity of the image to the way in which it is made. "White Flag" is painted on three separate panels: the stars, the seven upper stripes to the right of the stars, and the longer stripes below. Johns worked on each panel separately. After applying a ground of unbleached beeswax, he built up the stars, the negative areas around them, and the stripes with applications of collage—cut or torn pieces of newsprint, other papers, and bits of fabric. He dipped these into molten beeswax and adhered them to the surface. He then joined the three panels and overpainted them with more beeswax mixed with pigments, adding touches of white oil. The fast-setting medium of encaustic enabled Johns to make each brushstroke distinct, while the forty-eight-star flag design—contiguous with the perimeters of the canvas— provided a structure for the richly varied surface, which ranges from translucent to opaque. Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Art History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Josiah McElheny on Horace Pippin
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Josiah McElheny on Horace Pippin "Every human being has the potential of great insight." Video by The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Art History
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Khan Academy
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Marble Statue of a kouros
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Met curator Joan R. Mertens on self-reliance in Marble Statue of a kouros (youth), c. 590–580 B.C.E. from the Attic culture of ancient Greece. This kouros is one of the earliest marble statues of a human figure carved in Attica. The rigid stance, with the left leg forward and arms at the side, was derived from Egyptian art. The pose provided a clear, simple formula that was used by Greek sculptors throughout the sixth century B.C.E. In this early figure, geometric, almost abstract forms predominate, and anatomical details are rendered in beautiful analogous patterns. The statue marked the grave of a young Athenian aristocrat.

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Art History
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Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/04/2021
Mató Nájin/Standing Bear, Battle of Little Bighorn
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Mató Nájin/Standing Bear (Minneconjou Lakota/Teton Sioux), Battle of Little Bighorn, c. 1920, pencil, ink, and watercolor on muslin, 91.4 × 268 cm, made in Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota, United States (The Metropolitan Museum of Art). Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Nampeyo, Polacca polychrome water jar
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Nampeyo (Hopi-Tewa), Polacca Polychrome Water Jar, c. 1895–1900, clay and pigment, made in Arizona, U.S., 30.5 × 34.3 cm (The Metropolitan Museum of Art); speakers: Gaylord Torrence, Fred and Virginia Merrill Senior Curator of American Indian Art, The Nelson Atkins Museum of Art and Brian Vallo, Director, Indian Arts Research Center School for Advanced Research, Santa Fe, New Mexico. Created by The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
P.H. Emerson's naturalistic photography
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P.H. Emerson (1856-1936) believed that "nothing in nature has a hard outline" and attempted to emulate natural eyesight wherein the subject is sharp and everything else gradually falls out of focus. Created by Getty Museum.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Pre-Raphaelites: Curator's choice - Ford Madox Brown's 'Work'
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One of the most radical paintings of the Pre-Raphaelite movement is Work by Ford Madox Brown, which attempts to capture the entire social fabric of Victorian London in a single scene. Curator Tim Barringer explores its multiple stories. Ford Madox Brown's Work is one of over 150 works currently on show at Tate Britain in the exhibition Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde (2013). Created by Tate.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
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Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Pre-Raphaelites: Curator's choice - Millais's Isabella
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Curator Jason Rosenfeld reveals the story behind John Everett Millais's painting Isabella and explains why this historical work is inherently modern. Millais's Isabella is one of over 150 works currently on show at Tate Britain in the exhibition Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde. Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde is at Tate Britain (2013). Created by Tate.

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Art History
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Lesson
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Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021
Room: JMW Turner
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This video brought to you by Tate.org.uk. Curator David Brown explores the work of JMW Turner. Check out Turner Online for an in-depth look at the artist's life and work.

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Art History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Author:
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Date Added:
08/16/2021