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Molecular Structure of 1-Azanaphthalene
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Most commonly called quinoline, this compound is naturally found in coal tar. It was first extracted in 1834 by German chemist F. Runge and is now used as a flavoring agent, preservative, disinfectant and solvent. It can also be used to make fungicides, dyes, rubber chemicals, and drugs (especially anti-malarial medicines). It is one of several compounds that add to the bitterness in coffee. Although it is safe in our food, it is highly toxic in its vapor form. If inhaled, acute exposure can irritate respiratory tract and cause headaches, nausea, or a coma.

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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
06/23/2006
Molecular Structure of 3-Ethyl-2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclopent-2-en-1-one
Rating

3-Ethyl-2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclopent-2-en-1-one is a flavoring agent for maple and caramel odors. It is a fat soluble molecule that is found in tobacco smoke. Compared to other compounds that give food a caramel or maple odor, 3-Ethyl-2-hydroxy-4-methylcyclopent-2-en-1-one has a more burnt quality.

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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
10/04/2006
Molecular Structure of 3-Ethyl-2-hydroxy-5-methylcyclopent-2-en-one
Rating

3-Ethyl-2-hydroxy-5-methylcyclopent-2-en-1-one is a molecule in the caramel and maple flavoring category that is described as more burnt. The odor is very strong, burnt, caramel and maple. It has only been accounted for in tobacco and tobacco smoke.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
10/04/2006
Molecular Structure of Apatite
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Apatite can be any of three different minerals depending on the predominance of fluorine, chlorine, or the hydroxyl group. It is typically green, and either transparent or translucent. It is prominently found and produced in Mexico, Ontario, Germany, Russia, USA, Sri Lanka and Brazil. Apatite can be cut into gemstones, although it is too soft and brittle to be highly durable. Its main use is as a source of phosphate for fertilizer. An interesting fact about the name "apatite" is that it is part of what makes up the teeth in all vertebrate animals.

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Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/14/2002
Molecular Structure of Aquamarine
Rating

Aquamarine originated in the 1820s from a Latin term aqua marina which means sea water. This popular gem has been by Indians as a good luck charm. Legend has it that the gem was a treasure of mermaids. Aquamarine is found in Brazil and the African countries of Tanzania, Kenya and Nigeria, the island of Sri Lanka, Afghanistan and Russia. Aquamarine is usually heat treated to remove the yellow components to make it bluer. Aquamarine has even been thought to help cure headaches, insomnia and other such ailments. This gem is given on the 19th wedding anniversary as a sign of love.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/14/2002
Molecular Structure of Azurite
Rating

Azurite is a monoclinic blue crystal whose name is derived from the Arabic word, azure meaning blue. During the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries azurite was used as a blue paint pigment, but this pigment changes to green over time. This occurs because azurite reacts with water to produce malachite, which is green. Today this mineral is still used as a pigment, and as a minor ore of copper, an ornamental stone, and in jewelry. Azurite is found in many places but has notable occurrences in Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Morocco.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
03/26/2003
Molecular Structure of BHA
Rating

BHA is a phenolic mixture of isomers used as a food additive in butter, meats, chewing gum, potatoes, beer, and also in other manufactured goods such as cosmetics, rubber, and petroleum based products as well as others. As an antioxidant, BHA reacts preferentially with oxygen rather than allowing the oxidation of the fats and oils already present, thereby protecting the product from breaking down and spoiling. This fat-soluble preservative has a white to yellowish color as a waxy solid with a faint aromatic odor. Some studies have shown that there are individuals that experience difficulty in metabolizing BHA which can cause changes in behavior and health. Medically this compound has shown some antiviral and antimicrobial activity and may be of use in the treatment of herpes simplex and AIDS.

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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
10/11/2006
Molecular Structure of Blattellaquinone
Rating

This pheromone was identified and synthesized by the Roelof group in the Department of Entomology, Cornell University, in 2005. It is produced in the sex-pheromone producing glands of the female German cockroach (blattela germanica). In the future it might find application in trapping cockroaches as they are worldwide the most common residential and food-associated pests.

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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
05/01/2006
Molecular Structure of Caramel Furanone
Rating

This is a powerful aromatic compound commonly called “caramel furanone” because it smells like maple syrup and Fenugreek. It is hypothesized that Sotolon is formed from α-ketobutyric acid and acetaldehyde. It is responsible for the sweet, caramel flavor in coffee and is a main contributor to white wine rancidity. It can be found in liquid whey, sugar, some tobacco, and a variety of wines. Sotolon’s spicy aroma is highly potent and has an odor detection threshold of 0.001 ppb.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
10/02/2006
Molecular Structure of Cavansite
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Cavansite was first described in 1968, and is a rare brilliant ocean blue mineral associated with blue zeolites. It is only found in a few locations and the best crystals are found in Poona, India's zeolite quarries. Due to its rarity and color this mineral has recently become very popular. However, thus far, it has only been used as mineral specimen.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
04/25/2003
Molecular Structure of Cetyl alcohol
Rating

Cetyl alcohol is a nonionic surfactant as a hair coating in shampoos and conditioners. This is a fatty alcohol that is derived from natural fats and oils and is used as an emulsifier and emollient in skin moisturizing cosmetics. This white, crystalline, solid is insoluble in water and is often used as a lubricant for nuts and bolts. Cetyl alcohol has also been used in detergents, as a filler in plasticizers, an insulator, and as a thickener in creams and lotions. Extreme exposure to this substance has been found to cause irritation of the skin, eyes, and respiratory systems.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
10/18/2006
Molecular Structure of Chrysoberyl
Rating

Alexandrite was found on the birthday of Czar Alexander in 1831 in the Soviet Union. Chrysoberyl can be found in granite and rocks. The name is derived from chryso , meaning gold, and beryl from the Greek word given to green gemstones. Chrysoberyl is mostly found in Brazil, Sri Lanka, Russia, Africa, and Malagasy Republic. The mineral chrysoberyl carries unique traits; it changes color depending on the light source. It is said to have some metaphysical properties, such as assisting one in eagerness for excellence. The gems are found in jewelry stores ranging in a variety of price. Once called Oriental Topaz , chrysoberyl was considered a precious gem in ancient times. It is characterized by its high stability, high specific gravity, and color.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/14/2002
Molecular Structure of Coronol
Rating

Coronol, similar to Cyclotene, is a white to light brown solid, which tastes like burnt sugar or toffee. It is only used for flavoring and is found naturally in coffee and tobacco smoke. Coronol can be used to make a wide variety of flavors including coffee, brown sugar, caramel, roasted meats (chicken, pork or beef), and licorice.

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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
09/20/2006
Molecular Structure of Corundum
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Corundum or ruby is one of the oldest gems known to man. There is evidence of a Greek scholar, Theophastus, classifying precious stones such as rubies as early as 350 B.C. The first time Rubies were introduced in Europe was during the Greco-Roman times. Some of the best known producers of Corundum around the world are Southeast Asia, Australia, and southern Africa. In the U.S., it is found in North Carolina and Montana. Corundum is basically used as a gemstone for jewelry, but because of the high price scientists have made an inexpensive synthetic ruby. It is also used as an abrasive because of its hardness; it is employed industrially as a component of large machines to sandpaper.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/14/2002
Molecular Structure of Crocoite
Rating

Crocoite is an orange-red mineral which is found mainly in Tasmania, Australia. However it was first discovered in the Urals Mountains of Russia in 1766. Shortly after, in 1832, it was given its name in reference to its color, from a Greek word meaning saffron. It is occasionally used as a paint additive or pigment, and is the only natural occurring chromate of industrial importance. It is very sought after by mineral collectors due to its rarity and unusual color.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
05/07/2003
Molecular Structure of Cyclotene
Rating

This naturally occurring flavor chemical has a distinct maple quality. It is found in almost all roasted, sugar products and maple flavors. As a food additive, Cyclotene is a flavoring agent.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
09/18/2006
Molecular Structure of Domeykite
Rating

Domeykite is a copper arsenide mineral with off-white, yellow-brown, or copper-brown to steel-gray color. Its metallic luster and odd color make it a very unusual ornamental stone. It is used as minor ore of copper and for ornamental purposes. It is cut, polished, and made into attractive cabochons (a gemstone which has been shaped and polished), clocks, bookends and carvings. Domeykite is generally found in several mines of Chile, Ontario, Canada, and in Michigan, USA.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
05/08/2003
Molecular Structure of Epsomite
Rating

Epsomite, sometimes referred to as heptahydrite, is found all over the world including in places such as hot springs in Italy and in unusual salt deposits in South Africa. The color of this mineral is a white to pale shade of translucent green/pink. In addition, epsomite is used in the manufacture of cotton and silk, tanning leather, fertilizers, and explosives. Medicinally, it is used as a laxative.

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Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/27/2002
Molecular Structure of Erythrite
Rating

Erythrite, also known as cobalt bloom, is a weathering product of cobalt-containing minerals such as cobaltite. Erythrite has a deep red-purple to peach or pink-red color. It is a secondary oxidized cobalt mineral that froms in monoclinic crystals, in globular, and in earthy forms. It is used as a minor ore of cobalt and as mineral specimen. This mineral is found in some mines of Ontario, Morocco, and Germany.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
04/17/2003
Molecular Structure of Ethyl acetate
Rating

Ethyl acetate is a colorless, volatile liquid with a mild and fragrant odor. It is used as solvent in chemistry laboratories but can also be found in many household products such as paints, coatings, and adhesives. The compound is also used in some extraction processes such as decaffeination or purification of antibiotics. It is present in both nail polish and removers. Some synthetic fruit essences may contain this and other esters. Etymologists like to use this solvent for insect collecting as the vapor kill the insect quickly and keep it soft for mounting.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
03/08/2006
Molecular Structure of Ethyl cyclotene
Rating

Ethyl Cyclotene has a similar odor and flavor to Cyclotene. It is naturally found in coffee and tobacco. As a food additive, this compound has a very strong maple odor and taste. It contributes to the fragrance of rum and whiskey.

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Life Science
Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
09/18/2006
Molecular Structure of Fluorite
Rating

Fluorite is a transparent to translucent mineral that exists in a diverse variety of colors. The color is changeable, the most common being green and purple; but fluorite may also be colorless, white, yellow, blue, or brown. Colors may result from the presence of impurity ions such as rare earths or Mn4+, hydrocarbon inclusions, or lattice defects. It is commonly found in crystalline cubes in veins and associated with lead, tin, and zinc ores. Fluorite is the most abundant fluorine-bearing mineral that occurs as cubes or compact masses and more rarely as octahedral with complex modifications. It is found in many localities around the world but only a few produce large quantities of high quality. Fluorite frequently emits a blue-to-green fluorescence under ultraviolet radiation, especially if rare-earth or hydrocarbon material is present. Also, some fluorites are thermoluminescent, that is, they emit light when heated.

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Chemistry
Physics
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
04/16/2003
Molecular Structure of Furaneol
Rating

In 1956 a chemical called Furaneol was discovered in the form of a white to yellow powder. It is an aromatic compound found in many fruits that is used to flavor and odor food. Furaneol is often called “Strawberry furanone” because it is most notably found in strawberries. This compound appears in many other fruits, including pineapple. As a flavor enhancer, it is described as sweet, caramel-like, fruity or strawberry. The odor is comparable to cream caramel, sweet toffee, or fatty brown sugar.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
09/20/2006
Molecular Structure of Furaneol acetate
Rating

This compound was developed in 1996 as a food additive similar to Furaneol. This chemical is an adaptation that is more stable to air and cooking processes, and is used comparably to Furaneol. Its odor and flavor have been described as burnt sugar, caramel, fruity, pineapple, and sweet.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
10/13/2006
Molecular Structure of Glucocorticoid
Rating

Desoxymethasone is a member of a class of compounds called corticosteroids. In general, corticosteroids are used to treat itching, swelling, redness, and allergies. Other nontraditional uses of corticosteroids are in immune suppression for organ transplant and cancer treatment in conjunction with chemotherapeutics. They are often delivered as inhalants and topical ointments or creams. Desoxymethasone is used as a topical agent for treating psoriasis and other corticosteroid responsive dermatoses, especially when low concentrations or doses are desirable.

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Chemistry
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Data Set
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
09/09/2002
Molecular Structure of Gold
Rating

Man has known of gold since antiquity. It is a relatively soft metal with a characteristic yellow color that forms octahedral or dodecahedral crystals. Gold melts at 1338 degrees kelvin and boils at 3080 degrees kelvin. Gold is the most ductile and malleable of any element. It is used heavily as a standard for monetary systems, as well as in jewelry. This metal is also used for printed circuits, bonding transistors and diodes to wires, infrared reflectors, and specialized medical treatments.

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Chemistry
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Data Set
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Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
04/16/2003
Molecular Structure of Halloysite
Rating

Halloysite was first discovered in 1826 by Berthier in Angleur, Belgium. Halloysite clays are mined in Northland, New Zealand. There are two sites in Northland where halloysite is found: Matauri Bay and Mahimahi. Halloysite is used to make clay that can be used in many different things. Clay is exported to 24 countries for the manufacturing of tableware such as porcelain, bone china and fine china. It can also be used for hi-tech ceramic applications. Finally, halloysite clays can be employed extensively as suspension agents in glaze preparations.

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Chemistry
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Data Set
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Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/14/2002
Molecular Structure of Heptachlor epoxide
Rating

Heptachlor epoxide is an oxygenated metabolite of heptachlor (an organochhlorine pesticide that was used on crops and for termite control). Living organisms metabolize heptachlor most commonly to the epoxide. Heptachlor epoxide more stable in the environment than heptachlor itself and accumulates in soils, sediments, and biota. It has been found in human breast milk due to exposure to contaminated food, that is: crops that have been grown in soil to which heptachlor was applied, products from animals (diary and meats) that have eaten those crops, and fish that has been polluted by agricultural runoff.

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Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
06/13/2006
Molecular Structure of Hexachlorocyclopentadiene
Rating

Hexachlorocyclopentadiene (also called HEX or C-56) is a toxic yellow liquid used to manufacture pesticides such as chlordane, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, mirex, and kepone, among other things. Its is restricted under the Safe Drinking Water Act, a bill passed by the U.S. Congress in 1974 that limits the amount of pollutants that can be present in U.S. drinking water.

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Manufacturing
Chemistry
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
06/07/2006
Molecular Structure of Isophthalic acid
Rating

Isophthalic acid is one of the three simple aromatic dicarboxylic acids with the carboxyl groups in the meta postions. It is used to produce isophthalic polyester that together with other components is used in resin systems for flame retardants and in corrosion prevention.

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Chemistry
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Data Set
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained courtesy of the Cambridge Structural Database
Date Added:
01/10/2008
Molecular Structure of Maple Furanone
Rating

Maple furanone, or Ethyl Fenugreek Lactone, is an extremely potent flavoring compound that smells and tastes like sweet maple caramel. It naturally occurs in soy sauce, but it is an additive for caramel, coffee, maple, chicken and foods containing smoked flavors. The threshold for maple furanone is 0.00001 ppb or 1 part in 10^15. Therefore, it is one of the most potent flavor chemicals yet to be discovered and this makes it a valuable flavoring material.

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Chemistry
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Data Set
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
10/02/2006
Molecular Structure of Melanterite
Rating

Melanterite usually found in iron sulfides such as pyrite, pyrrhotite, marcasite and chalcopyrite, which are found in many mines all over the world including Spain, Germany, Sweden, and the United States. Melanterite is only one of the few water-soluble sulfate minerals. Some uses of melanterite are in the manufacturing of ink, in wool dying as a mordant, and also in water purification.

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Chemistry
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Data Set
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Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
08/23/2002
Molecular Structure of Mesifurane
Rating

Mesifurane is a compound in food flavoring that adds to a fruity aroma. Because it is very mild with a low odor threshold, Mesifurane is ideally used in fruit blends. These flavors generally include combinations of raspberry, strawberry, pineapple and grape.

Subject:
Chemistry
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Data Set
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
10/11/2006
Molecular Structure of Methyl Corylone
Rating

Methyl Corylone produces a taste and fragrance similar to Cyclotene. It is naturally found in coffee, tobacco and tobacco substitute cigarettes. This substance has a maple and caramel taste and as a flavor additive, it is recommended for caramel, maple, coffee and raisin.

Subject:
Chemistry
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Data Set
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Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Date Added:
10/04/2006
Molecular Structure of Mimetite
Rating

Mimetite, also known as mimetene and mimetesite, is a red, yellow, or brown mineral of the apatite group, commonly containing calcium or phosphate. Mimetite is a minor ore of lead and a popular mineral among collectors. The crystal system of mimetite is hexagonal and does not form well shaped crystals. Some notable occurrences are mines of Germany, Czech Republic, Mexico, England and Arizona.

Subject:
Chemistry
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Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
04/17/2003
Molecular Structure of Molybdenite
Rating

Molybdenite, or "Moly Ore" as it is sometimes called, is a high luster sulfide mineral. The name molybdenite comes from the greek word molybdos, "lead," as it is often a lead-grey color. It is virtually indistinguishable from graphite, except that molybdenite is only slightly lighter in color, yet heavier in weight. Molybdenite ore is composed of smaller molybdenum ions between layers of more massive sulfur ions. The sulfur layer has a strong bond to the molybdenum, but not to other sulfur layers, hence the softness and perfect cleavage. As the most common molybdenum-containing compound, almost all molybdenum is mined in the form of moly ore.

Subject:
Chemistry
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Data Set
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Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
05/08/2003
Molecular Structure of Muscovite
Rating

Muscovite, often called white mica, is a rock forming mineral that has a layered structure of sheets of aluminum silicate weakly bonded together by layers of potassium ions. Due to its perfect cleavage, elasticity, and low thermal conductivity, muscovite is often used for electrical and thermal insulation applications and also as a lubricant. Finely ground muscovite is sometimes used to make special surfaces in prints and paintings.

Subject:
Chemistry
Physics
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Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Obtained from the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database
Date Added:
05/02/2003
Molecular Structure of Nitrogen
Rating

Diatomic nitrogen is a colorless and odorless gas that is rather inert at ambient temperatures due to its strong triple bond. It is the most prevalent gas in Earth's atmosphere, comprising 78.1 % by volume. Nitrogen filled Earth's early atmosphere as it boiled off from the planetary matter forming the Earth some 4.5 billion years ago. On present day Earth, nitrogen participates in the nitrogen cycle, a process by which inert dinitrogen in the atmosphere is reduced and converted into accessible forms of nitrogen (ammonia, ammonium, and nitrate) that can be directly incorporated into living cells. This "nitrogen fixing" process is energy costly and can only be carried out by a few type of bacteria that are often found in close proximity to plants (e.g., Rhizobia living in the roots of Legumes). The cycle is closed as fixed nitrogen returns to the soil through decomposition of dead vegetation and is eventually reduced to diatomic nitrogen by bacteria in a process called denitrification. Humans have learned through ingenuity how to fix diatomic nitrogen and convert it to ammonia through the development of the Haber-Bosch process. Another anthropogenic transformation of dinitrogen is through combustion in the engines of automobiles or power plants. In this case, dinitrogen and oxygen from air react at high temperature and pressure to produce nitrogen oxides, the chemical precursors of smog.

Subject:
Chemistry
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Data Set
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Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
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Common molecules
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Date Added:
05/02/2006
Molecular Structure of Oxychlordane
Rating

Oxychlordane is designated as persistent organic pollutant (POP) by the UN. The compound persistent in the environment and bioaccumulates. It contaminates all environmental compartments and has affected fish populations and other biota. It undergoes global transport and is found in remote regions like the Arctic where it was never used or produced.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Other
Date Added:
06/13/2006
Molecular Structure of Oxygen
Rating

Diatomic oxygen (O2) is a highly reactive, paramagnetic molecule (containing two unpaired electrons) that occurs as a colorless gas at ambient temperatures but is a sapphire-blue liquid at very low temperatures (below –183 ºC). It is the second most abundant gas present in Earth's atmosphere. But it wasn't that way 4.5 billion years ago when the Earth's atmosphere was forming and N2 and CO2 were the dominant atmospheric gases. During that time, our planet was essentially devoid of oxygen, except for a small amount formed from the photodissociation of water and carbon dioxide by ultraviolet light from the sun. The oxygen that we breath today started to enter the atmosphere as a byproduct of photosynthesis carried out by early cyanobacteria 2.5 billion years ago. These bacteria thrived in the primordial oceans and were able to make organic nutrients using the light of the sun and the CO2 and water around them. During those early days, all the oxygen produced by bacteria was used up to oxidize iron that was dissolved in the oceans. It took about a hundred million years of oxygen production before all the iron precipitated, whereupon the oceans became saturated with oxygen and outgassed oxygen into the atmosphere. Today, oxygen continues to be produced photosynthetically by phytoplankton and green plants that have since evolved on Earth. Marine and terrestrial animals alike use the oxidizing power of dioxygen to pull electrons from organic molecules in electron transport systems that make up their metabolisms (aerobic respiration). Related to this is the best known reaction of diatomic oxygen: the reaction of O2 with the protein hemoglobin that that is responsible for oxygen transport in our blood.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Data Set
Interactive
Provider:
Indiana University Molecular Structure Center
Provider Set:
Reciprocal Net: A Distributed Crystallography Network for Researchers, Students, and the General Public
Author:
Common molecules
Other
Date Added:
05/01/2006