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African American History: From Emancipation to the Present
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The purpose of this course is to examine the African American experience in the United States from 1863 to the present. Prominent themes include the end of the Civil War and the beginning of Reconstruction; African Americans' urbanization experiences; the development of the modern civil rights movement and its aftermath; and the thought and leadership of Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X. WARNING: Some of the lectures in this course contain graphic content and/or adult language that some users may find disturbing.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Jonathan Holloway
Date Added:
04/30/2012
The American Novel Since 1945
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In "The American Novel Since 1945" students will study a wide range of works from 1945 to the present. The course traces the formal and thematic developments of the novel in this period, focusing on the relationship between writers and readers, the conditions of publishing, innovations in the novel's form, fiction's engagement with history, and the changing place of literature in American culture. The reading list includes works by Richard Wright, Flannery O'Connor, Vladimir Nabokov, Jack Kerouac, J. D. Salinger, Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Marilynne Robinson, Cormac McCarthy, Philip Roth and Edward P. Jones. The course concludes with a contemporary novel chosen by the students in the class.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Amy Hungerford
Date Added:
02/16/2011
The American Revolution
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The American Revolution entailed some remarkable transformations -- converting British colonists into American revolutionaries, and a cluster of colonies into a confederation of states with a common cause -- but it was far more complex and enduring then the fighting of a war. As John Adams put it, "The Revolution was in the Minds of the people . . . before a drop of blood was drawn at Lexington" -- and it continued long past America's victory at Yorktown. This course will examine the Revolution from this broad perspective, tracing the participants' shifting sense of themselves as British subjects, colonial settlers, revolutionaries, and Americans.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Joanne B. Freeman
Date Added:
06/16/2011
The Atmosphere, the Ocean, and Environmental Change
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This course explores the physical processes that control Earth's atmosphere, ocean, and climate. Quantitative methods for constructing mass and energy budgets. Topics include clouds, rain, severe storms, regional climate, the ozone layer, air pollution, ocean currents and productivity, the seasons, El Ni–o, the history of Earth's climate, global warming, energy, and water resources.

Subject:
Atmospheric Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Ronald B. Smith
Date Added:
04/30/2012
Capitalism: Success, Crisis and Reform
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In this course, we will seek to interpret capitalism using ideas from biological evolution: firms pursuing varied strategies and facing extinction when those strategies fail are analogous to organisms struggling for survival in nature. For this reason, it is less concerned with ultimate judgment of capitalism than with the ways it can be shaped to fit our more specific objectives Š—– for the natural environment, public health, alleviation of poverty, and development of human potential in every child. Each book we read will be explicitly or implicitly an argument about good and bad consequences of capitalism.

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Douglas W. Rae
Date Added:
06/16/2011
Cervantes' Don Quixote
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The course facilitates a close reading of Don Quixote in the artistic and historical context of renaissance and baroque Spain. Students are also expected to read four of Cervantes' Exemplary Stories, Cervantes' Don Quixote: A Casebook, and J.H. Elliott's Imperial Spain. Cervantes' work will be discussed in relation to paintings by Vel’zquez. The question of why Don Quixote is read today will be addressed throughout the course. Students are expected to know the book, the background readings and the materials covered in the lectures and class discussions.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Roberto Gonz’lez Echevarr’_a
Date Added:
06/16/2011
The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1845-1877
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This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War, from the 1840s to 1877. The primary goal of the course is to understand the multiple meanings of a transforming event in American history. Those meanings may be defined in many ways: national, sectional, racial, constitutional, individual, social, intellectual, or moral. Four broad themes are closely examined: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problem, personal experience, and social process; the experience of modern, total war for individuals and society; and the political and social challenges of Reconstruction.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
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Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
David Blight
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Dante in Translation
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The course is an introduction to Dante and his cultural milieu through a critical reading of the Divine Comedy and selected minor works (Vita nuova, Convivio, De vulgari eloquentia, Epistle to Cangrande). An analysis of Dante's autobiography, the Vita nuova, establishes the poetic and political circumstances of the Comedy's composition. Readings of Inferno, Purgatory and Paradise seek to situate Dante's work within the intellectual and social context of the late Middle Ages, with special attention paid to political, philosophical and theological concerns. Topics in the Divine Comedy explored over the course of the semester include the relationship between ethics and aesthetics; love and knowledge; and exile and history.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Giuseppe Mazzotta
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Death
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There is one thing I can be sure of: I am going to die. But what am I to make of that fact? This course will examine a number of issues that arise once we begin to reflect on our mortality. The possibility that death may not actually be the end is considered. Are we, in some sense, immortal? Would immortality be desirable? Also a clearer notion of what it is to die is examined. What does it mean to say that a person has died? What kind of fact is that? And, finally, different attitudes to death are evaluated. Is death an evil? How? Why? Is suicide morally permissible? Is it rational? How should the knowledge that I am going to die affect the way I live my life?

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Shelly Kagan
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Declaration of the Rights of Man (1789)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

The "Declaration of the Rights of Man" was approved by the National Assembly of France on August 26, 1789. It is a fundamental document of the French Revolution and in the history of human rights. It is included in the preamble of the constitutions of both the Fourth French Republic (1946) and Fifth Republic (1958) and is still current. Read the text of the document here.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Political Science
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Yale Law School Lillian Goldman Law Library
Date Added:
03/20/2014
The Early Middle Ages, 284-1000
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Major developments in the political, social, and religious history of Western Europe from the accession of Diocletian to the feudal transformation. Topics include the conversion of Europe to Christianity, the fall of the Roman Empire, the rise of Islam and the Arabs, the "Dark Ages," Charlemagne and the Carolingian renaissance, and the Viking and Hungarian invasions.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Paul H. Freedman
Date Added:
04/30/2012
Early Modern England
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This course is intended to provide an up-to-date introduction to the development of English society between the late fifteenth and the early eighteenth centuries: a vital period of social, political, economic, and cultural transition, and one which provided the immediate context of early British settlement in North America. Particular issues addressed in the lectures and section discussions, and available for deeper study as essay topics, will include: the changing social structure; households; local communities; gender roles; economic development; urbanization; religious change from the Reformation to the Act of Toleration; the Tudor and Stuart monarchies; rebellion, popular protest and civil war; witchcraft; education, literacy and print culture; crime and the law; poverty and social welfare; the changing structures and dynamics of political participation and the emergence of parliamentary government.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Keith E. Wrightson
Date Added:
06/16/2011
Environmental Politics and Law
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Can law change human behavior to be less environmentally damaging? Law will be examined through case histories including: environmental effects of national security, pesticides, air pollution, consumer products, plastics, parks and protected area management, land use, urban growth and sprawl, public/private transit, drinking water standards, food safety, and hazardous site restoration. In each case we will review the structure of law and evaluate its strengths and weaknesses.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
John P. Wargo
Date Added:
06/16/2011
Epidemics in Western Society Since 1600
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This course consists of an international analysis of the impact of epidemic diseases on western society and culture from the bubonic plague to HIV/AIDS and the recent experience of SARS and swine flu. Leading themes include: infectious disease and its impact on society; the development of public health measures; the role of medical ethics; the genre of plague literature; the social reactions of mass hysteria and violence; the rise of the germ theory of disease; the development of tropical medicine; a comparison of the social, cultural, and historical impact of major infectious diseases; and the issue of emerging and re-emerging diseases.

Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Frank Snowden
Date Added:
06/16/2011
European Civilization, 1648-1945
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This course offers a broad survey of modern European history, from the end of the Thirty Years' War to the aftermath of World War II. Along with the consideration of major events and figures such as the French Revolution and Napoleon, attention will be paid to the experience of ordinary people in times of upheaval and transition. The period will thus be viewed neither in terms of historical inevitability nor as a procession of great men, but rather through the lens of the complex interrelations between demographic change, political revolution, and cultural development. Textbook accounts will be accompanied by the study of exemplary works of art, literature, and cinema.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
John Merriman
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Financial Markets (2008)
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Financial institutions are a pillar of civilized society, supporting people in their productive ventures and managing the economic risks they take on. The workings of these institutions are important to comprehend if we are to predict their actions today and their evolution in the coming information age. The course strives to offer understanding of the theory of finance and its relation to the history, strengths and imperfections of such institutions as banking, insurance, securities, futures, and other derivatives markets, and the future of these institutions over the next century.

Subject:
Finance
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Robert Shiller
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Financial Theory
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This course attempts to explain the role and the importance of the financial system in the global economy. Rather than separating off the financial world from the rest of the economy, financial equilibrium is studied as an extension of economic equilibrium. The course also gives a picture of the kind of thinking and analysis done by hedge funds.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
John Geanakoplos
Date Added:
06/16/2011
Foundations of Modern Social Theory
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This course provides an overview of major works of social thought from the beginning of the modern era through the 1920s. Attention is paid to social and intellectual contexts, conceptual frameworks and methods, and contributions to contemporary social analysis. Writers include Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Adam Smith, Marx, Weber, and Durkheim.

Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Iv’n Szel’Šnyi
Date Added:
06/16/2011
France Since 1871
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This course covers the emergence of modern France. Topics include the social, economic, and political transformation of France; the impact of France's revolutionary heritage, of industrialization, and of the dislocation wrought by two world wars; and the political response of the Left and the Right to changing French society.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
John Merriman
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Freshman Organic Chemistry I
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This is the first semester in a two-semester introductory course focused on current theories of structure and mechanism in organic chemistry, their historical development, and their basis in experimental observation. The course is open to freshmen with excellent preparation in chemistry and physics, and it aims to develop both taste for original science and intellectual skills necessary for creative research.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Freshman Organic Chemistry II
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This is a continuation of Freshman Organic Chemistry I (CHEM 125a), the introductory course on current theories of structure and mechanism in organic chemistry for students with excellent preparation in chemistry and physics. This semester treats simple and complex reaction mechanisms, spectroscopy, organic synthesis, and some molecules of nature.

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
J. Michael McBride
Date Added:
04/30/2012
Frontiers and Controversies in Astrophysics
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This course focuses on three particularly interesting areas of astronomy that are advancing very rapidly: Extra-Solar Planets, Black Holes, and Dark Energy. Particular attention is paid to current projects that promise to improve our understanding significantly over the next few years. The course explores not just what is known, but what is currently not known, and how astronomers are going about trying to find out.

Subject:
Astronomy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Charles Bailyn
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Frontiers in Biomedical Engineering
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The course covers basic concepts of biomedical engineering and their connection with the spectrum of human activity. It serves as an introduction to the fundamental science and engineering on which biomedical engineering is based. Case studies of drugs and medical products illustrate the product development-product testing cycle, patent protection, and FDA approval. It is designed for science and non-science majors.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Mark Saltzman
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Fundamentals of Physics, I
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This course provides a thorough introduction to the principles and methods of physics for students who have good preparation in physics and mathematics. Emphasis is placed on problem solving and quantitative reasoning. This course covers Newtonian mechanics, special relativity, gravitation, thermodynamics, and waves.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Ramamurti Shankar
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Fundamentals of Physics, II
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This is a continuation of Fundamentals of Physics, I (PHYS 200), the introductory course on the principles and methods of physics for students who have good preparation in physics and mathematics. This course covers electricity, magnetism, optics and quantum mechanics.

Subject:
Physics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Ramamurti Shankar
Date Added:
06/16/2011
Game Theory
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This course is an introduction to game theory and strategic thinking. Ideas such as dominance, backward induction, Nash equilibrium, evolutionary stability, commitment, credibility, asymmetric information, adverse selection, and signaling are discussed and applied to games played in class and to examples drawn from economics, politics, the movies, and elsewhere.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Ben Polak
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Global Problems of Population Growth
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This survey course introduces students to the important and basic material on human fertility, population growth, the demographic transition and population policy. Topics include: the human and environmental dimensions of population pressure, demographic history, economic and cultural causes of demographic change, environmental carrying capacity and sustainability. Political, religious and ethical issues surrounding fertility are also addressed. The lectures and readings attempt to balance theoretical and demographic scale analyzes with studies of individual humans and communities. The perspective is global with both developed and developing countries included.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Biology
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Robert Wyman
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner
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This course examines major works by Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner, exploring their interconnections on three analytic scales: the macro history of the United States and the world; the formal and stylistic innovations of modernism; and the small details of sensory input and psychic life. WARNING: Some of the lectures in this course contain graphic content and/or adult language that some users may find disturbing.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Wai Chee Dimock
Date Added:
04/30/2012
Introduction to Ancient Greek History
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This is an introductory course in Greek history tracing the development of Greek civilization as manifested in political, intellectual, and creative achievements from the Bronze Age to the end of the classical period. Students read original sources in translation as well as the works of modern scholars.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Donald Kagan
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Introduction to New Testament History and Literature
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This course provides a historical study of the origins of Christianity by analyzing the literature of the earliest Christian movements in historical context, concentrating on the New Testament. Although theological themes will occupy much of our attention, the course does not attempt a theological appropriation of the New Testament as scripture. Rather, the importance of the New Testament and other early Christian documents as ancient literature and as sources for historical study will be emphasized. A central organizing theme of the course will focus on the differences within early Christianity (-ies).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Dale B. Martin
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Introduction to Political Philosophy
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This course is intended as an introduction to political philosophy as seen through an examination of some of the major texts and thinkers of the Western political tradition. Three broad themes that are central to understanding political life are focused upon: the polis experience (Plato, Aristotle), the sovereign state (Machiavelli, Hobbes), constitutional government (Locke), and democracy (Rousseau, Tocqueville). The way in which different political philosophies have given expression to various forms of political institutions and our ways of life are examined throughout the course.

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Steven B. Smith
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Introduction to Theory of Literature
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This is a survey of the main trends in twentieth-century literary theory. Lectures will provide background for the readings and explicate them where appropriate, while attempting to develop a coherent overall context that incorporates philosophical and social perspectives on the recurrent questions: what is literature, how is it produced, how can it be understood, and what is its purpose?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Linguistics
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Introduction to the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible)
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This course examines the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) as an expression of the religious life and thought of ancient Israel, and a foundational document of Western civilization. A wide range of methodologies, including source criticism and the historical-critical school, tradition criticism, redaction criticism, and literary and canonical approaches are applied to the study and interpretation of the Bible. Special emphasis is placed on the Bible against the backdrop of its historical and cultural setting in the Ancient Near East.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Christine Hayes
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Modern Poetry
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This course covers the body of modern poetry, its characteristic techniques, concerns, and major practitioners. The authors discussed range from Yeats, Eliot, and Pound, to Stevens, Moore, Bishop, and Frost with additional lectures on the poetry of World War One, Imagism, and the Harlem Renaissance. Diverse methods of literary criticism are employed, such as historical, biographical, and gender criticism.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Langdon Hammer
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Philosophy and the Science of Human Nature
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Philosophy and the Science of Human Nature pairs central texts from Western philosophical tradition (including works by Plato, Aristotle, Epictetus, Hobbes, Kant, Mill, Rawls, and Nozick) with recent findings in cognitive science and related fields. The course is structured around three intertwined sets of topics: Happiness and Flourishing; Morality and Justice; and Political Legitimacy and Social Structures.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Tamar Gendler
Date Added:
04/30/2012
Principles of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior
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This course presents the principles of evolution, ecology, and behavior for students beginning their study of biology and of the environment. It discusses major ideas and results in a manner accessible to all Yale College undergraduates. Recent advances have energized these fields with results that have implications well beyond their boundaries: ideas, mechanisms, and processes that should form part of the toolkit of all biologists and educated citizens.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Biology
Ecology
Genetics
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Date Added:
02/16/2011
The Psychology, Biology and Politics of Food
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This course encompasses the study of eating as it affects the health and well-being of every human. Topics include taste preferences, food aversions, the regulation of hunger and satiety, food as comfort and friendship, eating as social ritual, and social norms of blame for food problems. The politics of food discusses issues such as sustainable agriculture, organic farming, genetically modified foods, nutrition policy, and the influence of food and agriculture industries. Also examined are problems such as malnutrition, eating disorders, and the global obesity epidemic; the impact of food advertising aimed at children; poverty and food; and how each individual's eating is affected by the modern environment.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Biology
Nutrition
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Kelly D. Brownell
Date Added:
02/16/2011