Search Results (240)

View
Selected filters:
  • University of Nottingham
Advances in nanotechnology
Rating

In this podcast, Professor Moriarty discusses nanotechnology, and how it has led to a convergence of the traditional sciences. He talks about the commercial applications of nanotechnology such as hard disk technology in laptops, stain free materials and fabrics, self-cleaning windows and advanced water filtration.

He also touches on some of the myths about nanotechnology as well as some of the real dangers of Nanotechnology and the steps governments are taking to regulate it.

Professor Moriarty is a researcher in the field of nanotechnology.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Philip Moriarty
Afferent and efferent nerves
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

This learning object compares and contrasts afferent and efferent nerves of the peripheral nervous system.

This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy.

Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Andy Meal
BURN - Biosciences Undergraduate Research at Nottingham
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

Research produced 2006 - 2009.

BURN brings final year undergraduate research work to public view in a professional and relevant way. The students represented here have risen to the challenges of doing rigorous research and presenting their work to a wider audience. Their articles show the distance they have travelled during their studies. They also demonstrate the inquiry and critical thinking skills that have been developed. As graduates, they will be able to exploit these valuable skills in their careers, whether they continue in science or whatever path they may choose.

Suitable for undergraduate study

Coordinated by Dr Martin Luck, School of Biosciences

Dr Martin Luck is Associate Professor of Animal Physiology at the University of Nottingham. After reading Animal Physiology at Nottingham, he moved to the University of Leeds to complete a Masters in Steroid Endocrinology and a PhD in Physiology. He carried out post-doctoral research at the University of Southampton and then moved to Hamburg, Germany where he led a research group investigating ovarian follicular development. He returned to Nottingham as an academic in 1990. Dr Luck also has a BA in Mathematics, is a Fellow of the Society of Biology and the Higher Education Academy and is Chair of the Management Board of Bioscience Horizons, the National Undergraduate Research Journal. He has held teaching advisory posts at the University and been a consultant for the Quality Assurance Agency and Higher Education Academy.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Martin Luck
Back-bench rebels
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Philip Cowley, Reader in the University’s School of Politics and International Relations, was recently nominated for the Times Higher young researcher of the year award. In this podcast, Philip discusses his research into back bench rebellions within the British parliament. Philip describes his research as practical politics, linking academic research to the real world of political debate.

Since the British Labour party’s re-election with a reduced majority of 66 MPs in May 2005, some back bench Labour MPs have continued to vote against their own party, led by Prime Minister Tony Blair. This has forced the British government to make a series of concessions on a range of legislation. After the election, it was widely anticipated that Labour party MPs, with a reduced majority, would have to tow the party line. Philip discusses his research into back bench behaviour, highlighting that the British back bench MPs have traditionally been more rebellious than many people may expect.

Philip also discusses the issues behind the bank bench revolts, in particular highlighting that back bench rebellions are now at a post war high–ironically, as the new Labour government of 1997 was determined not to be a ‘split’ party like the previous Conservative government led by John Major. Philip also discusses the impact of the Tony Blair’s announcement that he will step down as leader of the Labour party, and whether this has affected the frequency of revolts.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Philip Cowley
Back-bench rebels
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Philip Cowley, Reader in the University’s School of Politics and International Relations, was recently nominated for the Times Higher young researcher of the year award. In this podcast, Philip discusses his research into back bench rebellions within the British parliament. Philip describes his research as practical politics, linking academic research to the real world of political debate.

Since the British Labour party’s re-election with a reduced majority of 66 MPs in May 2005, some back bench Labour MPs have continued to vote against their own party, led by Prime Minister Tony Blair. This has forced the British government to make a series of concessions on a range of legislation. After the election, it was widely anticipated that Labour party MPs, with a reduced majority, would have to tow the party line. Philip discusses his research into back bench behaviour, highlighting that the British back bench MPs have traditionally been more rebellious than many people may expect.

Philip also discusses the issues behind the bank bench revolts, in particular highlighting that back bench rebellions are now at a post war high–ironically, as the new Labour government of 1997 was determined not to be a ‘split’ party like the previous Conservative government led by John Major. Philip also discusses the impact of the Tony Blair’s announcement that he will step down as leader of the Labour party, and whether this has affected the frequency of revolts.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Philip Cowley
Beyond infinity
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This popular maths talk gives an introduction to various different kinds of infinity, both countable and uncountable. These concepts are illustrated in a somewhat informal way using the notion of Hilbert's infinite hotel. In this talk, the hotel manager tries to fit various infinite collections of guests into the hotel. The students should learn that many apparently different types of infinity are really the same size. However, there are genuinely "more" real numbers than there are positive integers, as is shown in the more challenging final section, using Cantor's diagonalization argument.

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Joel Feinstein
Blood vessels
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

This learning object explains and describes how the structure of a blood vessel is related to its function. This learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy.

Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Philip Cowley
British prime ministers 1783 - 1852
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

To access this learning object you should copy and paste this link into a browser: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/~cczjrt/pm/

The 'view resource' link on the right hand side of this page is not currently working.

This learning object on British Prime Ministers, 1783-1852, is designed to support the programme of lectures and seminars on the module The Many Faces of Reform: British politics, 1790-1850.

It will help familiarise you with the leading political figures and parliamentary groupings of the period we are studying. It will also test your knowledge of this information and help you think about some of the wider political developments which we will be studying.

Copyright Information: All of the images included in this resource are out of copyright and available under creative commons licence. They were sourced from Manuscripts and Special Collections at the University of Nottingham.

More information is available at:

http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/manuscriptsandspecialcollections

Suitable for study at all undergraduate and post graduate levels.

Dr Richard Gaunt, School of History

Dr Gaunt works on late eighteenth and early nineteenth century British history, with a particular specialism in the political and electoral history of the age. Research interests encompass work on national political figures such as Sir Robert Peel, the Duke of Wellington and Benjamin Disraeli as well as individuals with a strong Nottinghamshire connection, such as the 4th Duke of Newcastle (of Clumber Park) and William Edward and Godfrey Tallents (solicitors, land stewards and political agents of Newark).

Dr Gaunt has specialist research interests in the use of biographies, diaries and autobiographies and maintains scholarly interest in the political cartoons and caricatures of the age. These have given rise to publications in a range of academic and general readership outlets, to reviews and review articles and to exhibitions. He has also developed a number of web-based applications, drawing on research in the manuscripts and special collections held at Nottingham, in particular, a website exploring political themes from the time of the 4th Duke of Newcastle including working class unrest, electioneering and issues relating to Ireland.

Subject:
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Richard Gaunt
Julian Tenney
Sandra Huskinson
Caistor dig
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig.

September 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology

Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jerash (Jordan) (in collaboration with Prof. Beat Brenk (University of Rome, La Sapienza)). He has also worked extensively on the use of the past in constructing present identities in Greece and Albania.

Current Project activity includes work on the Caistor Roman Town project and the Butrint Project (Albania). The Butrint Project (Albania) is an interdisciplinary research project focused on the ancient and medieval town of Butrint on the coast of southern Albania. Involved with the project since its inception in 1994 Dr Will Bowden's current role within the project is concerned with the publication of the 1994-2003 excavations of the Triconch Palace (a major late Roman town-house) and the publication of the excavations of a Roman villa and early Christian church at the site of Diaporit, where he directed excavations from 2000-2004.

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Will Bowden
Caistor dig
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

A skeleton, found in September 2009 at one of the most important, but least understood, Roman sites in Britain is puzzling experts from The University of Nottingham.

Dr Will Bowden from the Department of Archaeology at the University of Nottingham and leader of excavations at the buried town of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund in Norfolk and is interviewed in this video on site at the dig.

September 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Dr Will Bowden, Associate Professor of Roman Archaeology, Department of Archaeology

Dr Will Bowden's previous research activity includes work on the Samnite cemetery and 12th century abbey at San Vincenzo al Volturno (Italy), survey of the Basilica of the Forty Martyrs (Albania), and survey of the cathedral complex at Jerash (Jordan) (in collaboration with Prof. Beat Brenk (University of Rome, La Sapienza)). He has also worked extensively on the use of the past in constructing present identities in Greece and Albania.

Current Project activity includes work on the Caistor Roman Town project and the Butrint Project (Albania). The Butrint Project (Albania) is an interdisciplinary research project focused on the ancient and medieval town of Butrint on the coast of southern Albania. Involved with the project since its inception in 1994 Dr Will Bowden's current role within the project is concerned with the publication of the 1994-2003 excavations of the Triconch Palace (a major late Roman town-house) and the publication of the excavations of a Roman villa and early Christian church at the site of Diaporit, where he directed excavations from 2000-2004.

The Caistor St Edmund Roman Town project is a new research initiative focused on the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, which was established in the territory of the Iceni in the aftermath of the Boudican revolt of AD 60-61. Research here is intended to chart the effects of the town's foundation on its surrounding area and to examine the development and eventual decline of the settlement. The project is being developed in collaboration with South Norfolk Council and the Norfolk Archaeological Trust and one of its key aims is to use ongoing research to encourage wider recognition and public enjoyment of this important Roman site.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Will Bowden
Career skills in economics
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

As taught in Autumn Semester 2009

Careers skills is a compulsory module for all Year 2 Economics students. It is not available to students from outside the School. It is one of a number of modules that make up the Nottingham Advantage Award.

The Nottingham Advantage Award is a new initiative focusing on student skills, employability and personal and academic development. Initially created for undergraduate students, it aims to develop the kind of competencies, learning and evaluation skills that employers are looking for in talented new graduates.

For more information on the Award you can visit: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy/introduction/life/advantageaward

Suitable For: Undergraduate Year Two Students

Dr David Harvey

Dr David Harvey has been a member of staff in the School of Economics since October 2003. He is a Reader in Econometrics. His research interests are in the area of time series econometrics, in particular tests for unit roots and structural change, forecast evaluation and applied time series analysis in general. He has published in journals such as the Journal of Econometrics, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, Journal of Applied Econometrics, Econometrics Journal, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Forecasting, International Journal of Forecasting.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr David Harvey
Cell membranes and compartments
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Outlines the proposed structure and properties of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells and identifies cell compartments that are separated from each other by at least one plasma membrane.

Andy Meal – lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy, University of Nottingham

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Andy Meal
Cell organelles
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

This learning object describes the structure and function of mammalian cell organelles. It is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy.

Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Andy Meal
Challenging reality
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

A behind the scenes interview with Professor Christopher Barnatt, Director and Producer of a new TV documentary on what we perceive to be real, and what, if any, future lies ahead for us.

The TV documentary was televised in April 2009 and was based on a book written by Professor Christopher Barnatt in 1997, also entitled Challenging Reality, which focused on momentous change across history. The new television series developed this theme further, with input from numerous other experts at the University of Nottingham, across three episodes looking at human achievement, geography and communications and the individual and their role in society.

April 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Professor Christopher Barnatt, Associate Professor Business School and Director Producer of "Challenging Reality"

Professor Christopher Barnatt has worked in the Business School at the University of Nottingham for around 19 years, where he is now Director of Teaching. Outside of that role he teaches computing and technology modules, mainly on undergraduate programmes. He is currently researching in the areas of Future Studies, Web 2.0, and green computing, and is actively involved in research, online teaching support and development in a variety of media termed as "Higher Education 2.0".

Outside of the University he is the author of ExplainingComputers.com and ExplainingTheFuture.com, as well as a regular contributor to the Morning Show on BBC Radio Nottingham and "The Night Before" on Kerrang! Radio.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Associate Professor Christopher Barnatt
Challenging reality
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

A behind the scenes interview with Professor Christopher Barnatt, Director and Producer of a new TV documentary on what we perceive to be real, and what, if any, future lies ahead for us.

The TV documentary was televised in April 2009 and was based on a book written by Professor Christopher Barnatt in 1997, also entitled Challenging Reality, which focused on momentus change across history. The new television series developed this theme further, with input from numerous other experts at the University of Nottingham, across three episodes looking at human achievement, geography and communications and the individual and their role in society.

April 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Professor Christopher Barnatt, Associate Professor Business School and Director Producer of "Challenging Reality"

Professor Christopher Barnatt has worked in the Business School at the University of Nottingham for around 19 years, where he is now Director of Teaching. Outside of that role he teaches computing and technology modules, mainly on undergraduate programmes. He is currently researching in the areas of Future Studies, Web 2.0, and green computing, and is actively involved in research, online teaching support and development in a variety of media termed as "Higher Education 2.0".

Outside of the University he is the author of ExplainingComputers.com and ExplainingTheFuture.com, as well as a regular contributor to the Morning Show on BBC Radio Nottingham and "The Night Before" on Kerrang! Radio.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Associate Professor Christopher Barnatt
Clinical leadership and management of change
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

The content presented here provides module information, teaching materials and assessment details for module B74GS6 ‘Clinical Leadership and Management of Change’. This module is offered as part of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing Studies, Division of Nursing, University of Nottingham.

The content presented throughout includes module descriptions, lecture notes, workshop notes, case studies, clinical skills and reading lists provided to postgraduate students at the University of Nottingham.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Life Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Chris Simpson
Collagen formation
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

The learning object describes how collagen fibres are assembled in the formation of connective tissue. The learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy.

Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Colleen McCants
Dr Andy Meal
Complex health needs 2: adult
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

The content presented here provides module information, teaching materials and assessment details for module B74GA5 ‘Complex Health Needs 2: Adult’. This module is offered as part of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing Studies, Division of Nursing, University of Nottingham.

The content presented throughout includes module descriptions, lecture notes, workshop notes, case studies, clinical skills and reading lists provided to postgraduate students at the University of Nottingham.

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Stuart Nairn
Complex health needs 2: mental health
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

The content presented here provides module information, teaching materials and assessment details for module B74GM5 ‘Complex Health Needs 2: Mental Health’. This module is offered as part of the Post Graduate Diploma in Nursing Studies, Division of Nursing, University of Nottingham.

The content presented throughout includes module descriptions, lecture notes, workshop notes, case studies, clinical skills and reading lists provided to postgraduate students at the University of Nottingham.

Subject:
Life Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Gemma Stacy
Conservation and biodiversity
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Dr. Richard Field research interests lie in conservation, biodiversity and the forces that structure ecological communities.

In this podcast, Dr Field from the School of Geography compares and contrasts his experiences as a researcher in national parks in Honduras and Indonesia, and the different types of ecological communities he has studied, and goes on to introduce the emerging field of conservation bio-geography.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Richard Field
Conservation and biodiversity
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Dr. Richard Field research interests lie in conservation, biodiversity and the forces that structure ecological communities.

In this podcast, Dr Field from the School of Geography compares and contrasts his experiences as a researcher in national parks in Honduras and Indonesia, and the different types of ecological communities he has studied, and goes on to introduce the emerging field of conservation bio-geography.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Richard Field
Consumer law
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

As taught in Autumn Semester 2009/10

This module looks at the role of the law in regulating business in the interests of consumers.

Suitable for: Second and final year undergraduates

Professor P.R Cartwright, School of Law

Peter Cartwright has been Professor of Consumer Protection Law at the University of Nottingham since 2004. He previously worked at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, where he obtained his PhD. Peter is the author of several books including Consumer Protection and the Criminal Law (2001) and Banks Consumers and Regulation (2004). The former won one of the Society of Legal Scholars’ prizes for outstanding legal scholarship by a scholar under the age of 40.

Peter is a member of the Financial Services Research Forum and of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Banking Regulation. He spent several years as a member of the UK Department of Trade of Trade and Industry’s Consumer Law Advisory Panel, and as Scientific Director of the European Credit Research Institute, Brussels. Peter has also served as Chair of the Society of Legal Scholars’ Consumer Law Panel.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Peter. R. Cartwright
Contemporary French culture in a global context
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

As taught in Semester two 2009.

This module looks at aspects of contemporary French culture in the context of an increasingly globalised culture and economy. In part, the module explores recent attempts to defend, redefine and interpret key aspects of French identity and culture as a means of negotiating ways of living in an era of globalisation and changing social structures.

The module focuses on aspects of everyday life in France that are charged with political and economic significance, namely food/wine production and consumption and sport. These areas all raise questions about a range of issues: the national and the ‘local’ versus the global; constructions of Frenchness in opposition to America; the decline of rural France; the contemporary redefinition of mythical national figures in the shape of le paysan; the continuity and significance of established French values and cultural practices; and the maintenance of a distinctively French social model in the face of globalisation.

A key component of the module delivery will be an in-depth analysis of the much discussed recent documentary film Mondovino, which examines the cultural and economic significance of global wine production. We will also look at the cultural significance of contemporary French football, with particular reference to the successful French national team of 1998 and 2000.

This module is suitable for study at undergraduate level 1.

Dr John Marks, School of Modern Languages and Culture.

Dr Marks is interested in the ethical, philosophical and cultural implications of molecular biology, biotechnology and genetics. He is also a member of the Science Technology Culture Research Group. His past research has focused primarily on the significance of contemporary French thought, particularly the work of Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr John Marks
Continental Portuguese intermediate semester B
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This module is aimed at students in year 2 semester B. The varied exercises cover a range of topics from Portuguese history to cooking. The transcript reader of the listening exercises allows students to identify words/passages they find difficult to understand.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Information Services Learning Team
Copyright
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In using copyright works (e.g. journals or newspaper articles, books, photographs, music) for study or research you are expected to observe certain legal and ethical constraints. In particular, you are bound to abide by the law of copyright.

This resource helps you to see how copyright could affect the way you study, research and work while at university.

This resource is suitable for all levels of study.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Fay Cross
Laurence Bebbington
Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network (Interview with Paul Crawford)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this video Professor Paul Crawford presents the Madness & Literature Network's seminar on Mental Illness and Creativity, featuring the respected authors Patrick Gale and Paul Sayer.

Presentation produced and delivered May 2009

Suitable for: Undergraduate Study and Community Education

Professor Paul Crawford, School of Midwifery & Physiotherapy

Professor Paul Crawford holds a personal chair in Health Humanities at the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy at the University of Nottingham. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, Professorial Fellow of the Institute of Mental Health and Visiting Professor of Health Communication at both the Medical Faculty, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan, and the University of Technology, Sydney, Australia. He is Co-Founder (with Professor Ron Carter) and chair of the Health Language Research Group at the University of Nottingham, bringing together academics and clinicians to advance applied linguistics in health care settings. In 2008 he was awarded a Lord Dearing Award for Excellence in Teaching and Learning. Crawford’s scholarship in the core areas of literature, linguistics, mental health and the philosophy of research has gained attention at national and international levels, particularly in Canada, North America, Europe and Australia. He has originated and led interdisciplinary, innovative projects that advance multimodal and pragmatic approaches to health language study and health humanities generally.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Paul Crawford
Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network (Presentation by Patrick Gale)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this video author Patrick Gale shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Paul Sayer.

Presentation delivered May 2009.

Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education

Patrick Gale, Author.

Patrick Gale was born on the Isle of Wight in 1962, where his father was prison governor at Camp Hill prison. Later the family moved to London. He boarded at The Pilgrim's School, where he was a chorister, then went to Winchester College before reading English at Oxford University. He did a series of odd jobs to support his writing before becoming a full-time novelist, moving to Cornwall in 1987. He is the author of several novels, and also writes short stories and novellas. He has written one book of non-fiction, on the American novelist Armistead Maupin, and also writes book reviews for The Daily Telegraph.

His first two novels, Ease and The Aerodynamics of Pork, were published on the same day in 1986. The Facts of Life (1995) tells the story of Edward Pepper, an exile saved from Nazi Germany in the Kindertransport, and Tree Surgery for Beginners (1998) is about Laurence Frost, an inarticulate tree surgeon. A Sweet Obscurity (2003) is told from the alternating viewpoints of four separate characters. Friendly Fire (2003) draws on the author's own experience of a late 1970s adolescence, and Notes from an Exhibition (2007) is set in Cornwall, exploring the effects of mental illness on artist Rachel Kelly and her family.

Important Copyright Information:

You are free to copy, distribute and transmit this video as long as you credit the original author. The video is also available on YouTube

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Patrick Gale
Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network (Presentation by Patrick Gale)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this video author Patrick Gale shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Paul Sayer.

Presentation delivered May 2009.

Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education

Patrick Gale, Author.

Patrick Gale was born on the Isle of Wight in 1962, where his father was prison governor at Camp Hill prison. Later the family moved to London. He boarded at The Pilgrim's School, where he was a chorister, then went to Winchester College before reading English at Oxford University. He did a series of odd jobs to support his writing before becoming a full-time novelist, moving to Cornwall in 1987. He is the author of several novels, and also writes short stories and novellas. He has written one book of non-fiction, on the American novelist Armistead Maupin, and also writes book reviews for The Daily Telegraph.

His first two novels, Ease and The Aerodynamics of Pork, were published on the same day in 1986. The Facts of Life (1995) tells the story of Edward Pepper, an exile saved from Nazi Germany in the Kindertransport, and Tree Surgery for Beginners (1998) is about Laurence Frost, an inarticulate tree surgeon. A Sweet Obscurity (2003) is told from the alternating viewpoints of four separate characters. Friendly Fire (2003) draws on the author's own experience of a late 1970s adolescence, and Notes from an Exhibition (2007) is set in Cornwall, exploring the effects of mental illness on artist Rachel Kelly and her family.

Important Copyright Information:

You are free to copy, distribute and transmit this video as long as you credit the original author. The video is also available on YouTube

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Patrick Gale
Creativity and mental illness : the Madness and Literature Network (Presentation by Paul Sayer)
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this video author Paul Sayer shares his thoughts on madness and creativity during the Madness and Literature Network Seminar in 2009. For related videocasts see those presented by Professor Paul Crawford and Patrick Gale.

Presentation delivered May 2009.

Suitable for: Undergraduate study and Community Education

Paul Sayer, Author.

Paul Sayer is a former psychiatric nurse whose first novel The Comforts of Madness (1988) won the Constable Trophy, the Whitbread First Novel prize, and the Whitbread Book of the Year award. His five subsequent books include The Absolution Game (1992), Booker Prize 'long-listed', and Men in Rage (1999) published by Bloomsbury. His work has been translated into ten languages, and he has been the recipient of a number of scholarships, including a Society of Authors travel award and, for 2007/8, a Wingate Scholarship to support the writing of a new novel.

Paul has tutored for Arvon, and has numerous credits for reviews and features in: the Sunday Times, Times, Independent, Literary Review, Time Out, Nursing Standard, Nursing Times, and many more. Psychiatry and psychological sciences remain an interest.

'The Comforts of Madness is surely sad, but enthralling in its excellence. Sayer's style is understated and surehanded.'- New York Newsday

Important Copyright Information:

You are free to copy, distribute and transmit this video as long as you credit the original author. The video is also available on YouTube

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Paul Sayer
Crown and peers: the monarchy and the Lords in British politics, 1783-1846
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

Welcome to this learning object on the Monarchy and the Lords in British Politics, 1783-1846. It has been developed for use on the module The Many Faces of Reform which explores key themes in the political history of Britain from the time of the French Revolution to the middle of the nineteenth century.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Richard Gaunt
Nuno Jorge
Darwin for a day
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

As part of the University of Nottingham, School of Biology's 200 years of Darwin celebrations,
evolutionary geneticist Professor John Brookfield in full Victorian attire delivered a talk, as Darwin, on the theory of evolution via natural selection.

In this video Professor John Brookfield is interviewed about his experience of being Darwin for a day

Interview took place March 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Professor John Brookfield, Professor of Evolutionary Genetics, School of Biology

Professor John Brookfield has a BA in Zoology, University of Oxford 1976; PhD in Population Genetics, University of London 1980; He has worked as a Research Demonstrator in Genetics, University College of Swansea 1979-1981; Visiting Fellow, Laboratory of Genetics, The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, North Carolina 1981-1983; Lecturer in Genetics, University of Leicester 1983-1986; Lecturer (1987), Reader (1997) and Professor of Evolutionary Genetics (2004) University of Nottingham. He was Managing Editor, Heredity (2000-2003). Vice-President (External Affairs), Genetics Society 2008-, Appointed Fellow of the Institute of Biology, 2009. Member RAE Biological Sciences Panel and Sub-Panel, 2001 and 2008.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor John Brookfield
Darwin for a day
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

As part of the University of Nottingham, School of Biology's 200 years of Darwin celebrations,
evolutionary geneticist Professor John Brookfield in full Victorian attire delivered a talk, as Darwin, on the theory of evolution via natural selection.

In this video Professor John Brookfield is interviewed about his experience of being Darwin for a day

Interview took place March 2009

Suitable for Undergraduate study and community education

Professor John Brookfield, Professor of Evolutionary Genetics, School of Biology

Professor John Brookfield has a BA in Zoology, University of Oxford 1976; PhD in Population Genetics, University of London 1980; He has worked as a Research Demonstrator in Genetics, University College of Swansea 1979-1981; Visiting Fellow, Laboratory of Genetics, The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, North Carolina 1981-1983; Lecturer in Genetics, University of Leicester 1983-1986; Lecturer (1987), Reader (1997) and Professor of Evolutionary Genetics (2004) University of Nottingham. He was Managing Editor, Heredity (2000-2003). Vice-President (External Affairs), Genetics Society 2008-, Appointed Fellow of the Institute of Biology, 2009. Member RAE Biological Sciences Panel and Sub-Panel, 2001 and 2008.

Subject:
Applied Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor John Brookfield
De Gaulle's Republic 1958 - 1969
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

This is a module framework. It can be viewed online or downloaded as a zip file.

As taught in Spring Semester 2010,

This module examines the founding first decade of the Fifth Republic by focusing principally, though not exclusively, on the personality and political ideas of Charles de Gaulle.

It begins by examining his emergence as the providential leader of the Resistance, to the frustrations of the Liberation and his thwarted plans for the constitutional renaissance of France, through the Fourth Republic and the wilderness years to his return in 1958, before turning to focus on the new regime and tracing the political history of the Fifth Republic between 1958 and 1969: the period Pierre Viansson-Ponté christened ‘la République gaullienne’.

The main, though by no means exclusive axes of enquiry will be the constitutional mutation of the regime and the political narrative in the period.

This module is suitable for undergraduate level 3 study.

Dr Paul Smith.

Dr Smith is a historian who specialises in 19th and 20th century French politics, political institutions and political culture. He has particular research interests in the French Senate, Feminism in France 1914-1945, French local government, and Contemporary French Politics in general. Recent research and publication outputs have concentrated on the French Senate, from 1870 to the present day.

Subject:
History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Paul Smith
Definitions, proofs and examples
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

During the academic year 2011-12, Dr Joel Feinstein gave five optional example classes to his second-year Mathematical Analysis students on Definitions, Proofs and Examples. Dr Feinstein recorded videos of these classes (presented here) to go along with his previous videos on 'How and why we do mathematical proofs'.
These sessions are intended to reinforce material from lectures, while also providing more opportunities for students to hone their skills in a number of areas, including the following:

•working with formal definitions

•making deductions from information given

•writing relatively routine proofs

•investigating the properties of examples

•thinking up examples with specified combinations of properties

Subject:
Mathematics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Joel Feinstein
Depiction of terrorism in film and television
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this podcast, Professor Roberta Pearson from the School of American and Canadian Studies, discusses the fictional representation of terrorism in modern day television programmes and why more and more people are using fiction instead of the news to inform their opinions of world events.

Professor Pearson considers the frequent engagement of modern audiences with such television series’ as ‘24’ and ‘Battlestar Galactica’ and how these common cultural experiences should not be underestimated as a factor in affecting the way public issues are viewed.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Roberta Pearson
Depiction of terrorism in film and television
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this podcast, Professor Roberta Pearson from the School of American and Canadian Studies, discusses the fictional representation of terrorism in modern day television programmes and why more and more people are using fiction instead of the news to inform their opinions of world events.

Professor Pearson considers the frequent engagement of modern audiences with such television series’ as ‘24’ and ‘Battlestar Galactica’ and how these common cultural experiences should not be underestimated as a factor in affecting the way public issues are viewed.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Professor Roberta Pearson
Different types of cells
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

This learning object describes As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

The learning object distinguishes between some examples of different types of cells on the basis of their microscopic appearance. The learning object is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy.

Dr Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Andy Meal
Different types of epithelia
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

As taught Semesters 1 and 2, 2011

This learning object which is used as part of the level 1 Biological Sciences module delivered by the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy relates the microscopic appearance and structure of epithelia to their function.

Andy Meal, Lecturer in Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Physiotherapy

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson
Provider:
University of Nottingham
Author:
Dr Andy Meal