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2021 NEBHE Open Education Community of Practice Syllabus
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Learning objectives:

-Leverage the benefits of openly licensed materials to create more culturally responsive and relevant learning environments and resources for students
-Develop a set of inclusive teaching practices to implement in your course that center students as authoritative voices
-Revise or create a renewable assignment that invites students as knowledge creators
-Leverage Open Pedagogy to center social justice in your course learning outcomes

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Lindsey Gumb
Date Added:
05/17/2021
AHE 617 Needs Assessment in Higher Education
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CC BY-NC
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Explores needs assessment as an applied research tool. Addresses definitions of types of needs assessment and compares needs assessment approaches. Applies research skills in the creation, design and implementation of a pilot needs assessment project focused around educational inequities.

Measurable Student Learning Outcomes
Evaluate varying definitions and types of needs assessment.
Compare similarities, differences and uses for five approaches to conducting needs assessment projects.
Apply applied research skills in the creation, design and implementation of a pilot needs assessment project.
Classify the findings about educational inequities and identify action/remedy through the implementation of a pilot assessment.

Subject:
Higher Education
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Laura Boehme
Date Added:
11/24/2021
AOJ 144: Probation and Parole
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CC BY
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In this course, you will analyze the essential elements of probation and parole by examining the history of sentencing and post-sentence release from its beginnings to the contemporary institution to which it has evolved. Integrated within this study, a variety of topics will be examined through anantiracist lens. The juvenile justice system, probation administration, sentencing, community-based corrections, the theory of rehabilitation, probation and parole officers, special programs, intermediate sanctions, and the future trends and issues related to probation and parole will all be considered with a key focus on social justice.

Subject:
Law
Sociology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Author:
Open for Antiracism Program (OFAR)
Date Added:
07/27/2021
AP Environmental Science Course Syllabus
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This AP Environmental Science class is intended to meet the same objectives as a first-year college-based course.
However, the method of instruction for this course is unique compared to similar courses because we have adopted
a project-based learning (PBL) approach. Although PBL may take many forms, our approach involves student
investigations and simulations that require students to think like scientists, policymakers, farmers, and other adults
in real-world settings. Teachers engage students in collaborative problem solving, argumentation, and deep
exploration of the concepts and principles of the discipline. The goal for student learning is understanding rather
than relying on rote memory to create meaningful learning and knowledge that is actionable, adaptive, and
transferable.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
Lucas Education Research
Provider Set:
Sprocket
Date Added:
09/04/2019
Remix
"Abnormal Psychology"
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This is an Abnormal Psychology course at a community college. The syllabus outlines how the course is broken down by modules and possible discussion questions that could be used each week as students work through the material.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
Middlesex Community College
Author:
Jennifer Pisarik
Date Added:
06/22/2021
Abnormal Psychology
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

This course is designed to provide an engaging and personally relevant overview of the discipline of Abnormal Psychology. You will examine the cognitive and behavioral patterns which impair personal effectiveness and adjustment. Students will provide much of the substantive content and teaching presence in this course. Additional content has been curated from "The Noba Project (http://nobaproject.com/)" and "Abnormal Psychology: An e-text! (http://abnormalpsych.wikispaces.com/).
Openly-licensed course materials developed for the Open Educational Resources (OER) Degree Initiative, led by Achieving the Dream. https://courses.lumenlearning.com/catalog/achievingthedream

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Author:
Bill Pelz
Date Added:
01/07/2020
Achieving Public Dialogue
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CC BY-NC-SA
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There are a wide range of interactions between 'science' and 'the public'. Examples range from visiting a museum, or indulging in a science-related hobby, to reading a newspaper article about a breakthrough in the techniques of therapeutic cloning. Many of these interactions could be said to be 'passive'. This unit explores the practicalities of the public becoming more 'active' in the direction of science practice by 'two-way' interactions, with dialogue taking place between science and some part of 'the public',

Subject:
Communication
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
Action Research for Educational, Professional, and Personal Change, Fall 2007
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This course covers techniques for and critical thinking about the evaluation of changes in educational practices and policies in schools, organizations, and informal contexts. Topics include quantitative and qualitative methods for design and analysis, participatory design of practices and policies, institutional learning, the wider reception or discounting of evaluations, and selected case studies, including those arising from semester-long student projects.

Subject:
Education
Material Type:
Case Study
Full Course
Syllabus
Provider:
UMass Boston
Provider Set:
UMass Boston OpenCourseWare
Author:
Ph.D.
Professor Peter Taylor
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Adaptation - Vampirism | Ecology & Environment | the virtual school
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CC BY-NC-ND
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5.0 stars

An alternative introduction to the chapter "Adapting and Living Together" - explained with Vamipres! It sits within the Ecology and Environment topic of the virtual school GCSE Biology. Teachers can choose which engagement video is better for their own uses and students.

Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Syllabus
Author:
fuseschool - a global OER programme
Date Added:
01/28/2016
African American History: From Emancipation to the Present
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The purpose of this course is to examine the African American experience in the United States from 1863 to the present. Prominent themes include the end of the Civil War and the beginning of Reconstruction; African Americans' urbanization experiences; the development of the modern civil rights movement and its aftermath; and the thought and leadership of Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X. WARNING: Some of the lectures in this course contain graphic content and/or adult language that some users may find disturbing.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Jonathan Holloway
Date Added:
04/30/2012
The Age of Human Rights
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This is a syllabus for the course "The Age of Human Rights" (Capstone course – International Relations & International Law) designed for the University College Groningen (UCG), University of Groningen (the Netherlands). The syllabus is designed by taking into consideration the UCG’s focus on project-based education and it is further inspired by the design thinking approach to education.

This course aims to do two things. Firstly, to provide a good knowledge base on what international human rights are and what mechanisms exist to implement, supervise and enforce them. Secondly, to discuss in a critical manner how international human rights thinking has become inextricably linked to almost all areas of international cooperation. Students are asked to critically analyse specific human rights issues from a multi- or interdisciplinary perspective, thereby drawing upon information from the various disciplinary fields that they have covered in their programmes.

The first part of the course (6 sessions) is used to create the relevant knowledge base through interactive lectures. In the second part of the course (12 sessions), students are asked to work in small subgroups on particular issue areas which will be chosen in consultation with the instructors. The course concludes with a half-day conference on human rights in which the participating students act as panel members (this may be subject to change).

Subject:
Law
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Mando Rachovitsa
Date Added:
05/19/2021
American Government (POLS 202)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

This course covers American Government: the Constitution, the branches of government (Presidency, Congress, Judiciary) and how politics works: elections, voting, parties, campaigning, policy making. In addition weęll look at how the media, interest groups, public opinion polls and political self-identification (are you liberal or conservative, Democrat or Republican or something else?) impact politics and political choices. Weęll also cover the basics in economic, social and foreign policy and bring in current issues and show how they illustrate the process.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
American History II OER Syllabus
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CC BY
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This is an OER American History II course designed for lower-division college students. It is in hybrid format, giving students time to use the databases to do their own research for each unit.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Andrea Ringer
Date Added:
04/27/2021
American Literature I (ENGL 246)
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CC BY
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In this class we will practice skills in reading, analyzing, and writing about fiction, poetry and drama from a select sampling of 20th Century American Literature. Through class discussion, close reading, and extensive writing practice, this course seeks to develop critical and analytical skills, preparing students for more advanced academic work.

Subject:
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
The American Novel Since 1945
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5.0 stars

In "The American Novel Since 1945" students will study a wide range of works from 1945 to the present. The course traces the formal and thematic developments of the novel in this period, focusing on the relationship between writers and readers, the conditions of publishing, innovations in the novel's form, fiction's engagement with history, and the changing place of literature in American culture. The reading list includes works by Richard Wright, Flannery O'Connor, Vladimir Nabokov, Jack Kerouac, J. D. Salinger, Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Marilynne Robinson, Cormac McCarthy, Philip Roth and Edward P. Jones. The course concludes with a contemporary novel chosen by the students in the class.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Amy Hungerford
Date Added:
02/16/2011
The American Renaissance
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The ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĄ_American Renaissance,ĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺÎĺ a period of tremendous literary activity that took place in America between the 1830s and 1860s represents the cultivation of a distinctively American literature. The student will begin this course by looking at what it was in American culture and society that led to the dramatic outburst of literary creativity in this era. The student will then explore some of the periodĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s most famous works, attempting to define the emerging American identity represented in this literature. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: discriminate among the key economic, technological, social, and cultural transformations underpinning the American Renaissance; define the transformations in American Protestantism exemplified by the second Great Awakening and transcendentalism; list the key tenets of transcendentalism and relate them to romanticism more broadly and to social and cultural developments in the antebellum United States; analyze EmersonĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s place in defining transcendentalism and his key differences from other transcendentalists; analyze competing conceptualizations of poetry and its construction and purpose, with particular attention to Poe, Emerson, and Whitman; define the formal innovations of Dickinson and their relationship to her central themes; describe the emergence of the short story as a form, with reference to specific stories by Hawthorne and Poe; distinguish among forms of the novel, with reference to specific works by Hawthorne, Thompson, and Fern; analyze the ways that writers such as Melville, Brownson, Davis, and Thoreau saw industrialization and capitalism as a threat to U. S. society; develop the relationship between ThoreauĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s interest in nature and his political commitments and compare and contrast his thinking with Emerson and other transcendentalists; analyze the different ways that sentimentalism constrained and empowered women writers to critique gender conventions, with reference to specific works by writers such as Fern, Alcott, and Stowe; define the ways that the slavery question influenced major texts and major controversies over literature during this period. This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 405)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012
The American Revolution
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The American Revolution entailed some remarkable transformations -- converting British colonists into American revolutionaries, and a cluster of colonies into a confederation of states with a common cause -- but it was far more complex and enduring then the fighting of a war. As John Adams put it, "The Revolution was in the Minds of the people . . . before a drop of blood was drawn at Lexington" -- and it continued long past America's victory at Yorktown. This course will examine the Revolution from this broad perspective, tracing the participants' shifting sense of themselves as British subjects, colonial settlers, revolutionaries, and Americans.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Joanne B. Freeman
Date Added:
06/16/2011
American Sign Language I (ASL 121)
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CC BY
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0.0 stars

ASL I is an introduction to the naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
American Sign Language II (ASL 122)
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CC BY
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ASL II is a sequential course following ASL I, which continues to build knowledge of the naturally existing language widely used by Deaf people in North America. Since ASL is a visual-gestural language, students will need to continue to develop unique communication skills. These consist of using the hands, body, face, eyes and space. In order to achieve progress in this class, it is important to become comfortable communicating with your whole body and listening with your eyes.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
American Sign Language III (ASL 123)
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CC BY
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ASL III is the third quarter of the first year study of American Sign Language (ASL) and the people who use it. ASL III will enhance the use of ASL grammar and consist of concentrated efforts to develop the studentęs expressive and receptive skills. The course will continue to provide insights into Deaf Cultural values, attitudes and the Deaf community. Now learning more abstract concepts of the language, ASL III students will be able to: narrate events that occurred in the past, ask for solutions to everyday problems, tell about life events, and describe objects. Students will also be able to: demonstrate intermediate finger spelling competency, generate complex ASL structures with intermediate vocabulary knowledge, execute a wide variety of grammatical principles, including classifiers and inflections, adapt to different sign language registers, dialects and accents, and create opportunities to interact with members of the Deaf community.

Subject:
Languages
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
Analytical and Argumentative Writing Syllabus
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CC BY
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WR122 continues the focus of WR 121 on academic writing as a means of inquiry with added emphasis on persuasion and argument supported by external research; it also uses critical reading, discussion and the writing process to explore ideas, develop cultural awareness and formulate original positions. The course emphasizes development of writing and critical thinking through logical reasoning, rhetorical control, independent research, and information literacy.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Porter Raper
Date Added:
05/19/2020
Anatomy and Physiology 1
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Syllabus for the first half of a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body. This course uses an open textbook, Anatomy & Physiology, from OpenStax.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
Springfield Technical Community College
Author:
STCC Library
Date Added:
04/26/2022
Anatomy and Physiology 2
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Syllabus for the second half of a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body. This course uses an open textbook, Anatomy & Physiology, from OpenStax.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Anatomy/Physiology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
Springfield Technical Community College
Author:
STCC Library
Date Added:
04/26/2022
Animals at the Extremes: Hibernation and Torpor
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
5.0 stars

Hibernation is an ingenious adaptation that some animals employ to survive difficult conditions in winter. This unit examines the differences between hibernation and torpor, and discusses the characteristic signs of hibernation behavior It explores the triggers that bring on hibernation, and whether internal signals or external season cues are predominant. It also examines the physiological adaptations that occur in hibernating animals.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
Animals at the Extremes: Polar Biology
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The extreme challenges of life in the polar regions require the animals who make their habitat there to make many adaptations. This unit explores the polar climate and how animals like reindeer, polar bears, penguins, sea life and even humans manage to survive there. It looks at the adaptations to physiological proceses, the environmental effects on diet, activity and fecundity, and contrasts the strategies of aquatic and land-based animals in surviving in this extreme habitat. This unit builds on and develops ideas from two other 'Animals at the extreme' units: The desert environment (S324_1) and Hibernation and torpor (S324_2).

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
Animals at the Extremes: the Desert Environment
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Animal life has adapted to survive in the most unlikely and inhospitable habitats. This unit looks at the surprisingly diverse desert climates throughout the world and mammals, birds, lizards and amphibians that survive there. It splits these animals into three groups according to their strategy for survival: evaders, evaporators and endurers, then discusses how these strategies work on a biochemical and physiological level.

Subject:
Biology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
Anthropology Mini Lectures: A collective resource for online teaching in the time of COVID19
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

This is a collection of mini lectures created by anthropologists and those in conversation with anthropology as supplimental material to assist college and university instructors who were made to shift their courses online because of COVID19.For more information, see here.To contribute, please create an OER author account and send your name and OER registered email to AnthropologyTeaching@gmail.com.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Zoe Wool
Brett Hill
Lauren Visconti
Geir Henning Presterudstuen
Laura Ogden
Jonathan Padwe
Sabra Thorner
Flosha Diliena Liyana Saran Arachchige Don
Heikki Wilenius
Jonathan Wald
Noah Theriault
Rosalyn Bold
Andrew Flachs
Emily Yates-Doerr
Rebecca Lester
Katrina Thompson
Emily Hammerl
Rose Wellman
Devin Proctor
Daniel Souleles
Kim de Rijke
Maira Hayat
Kate Fischer
Laura Story Johnson
Chloe Ahmann
Paige West
Date Added:
03/15/2020
Anthropology: World Archaeology Syllabus
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ANTH 150 World Archaeology
Introduction to archaeology and cultural change from the earliest times to the advent of state-level societies.

Course Description:
• When did we become fully modern humans?
• When (and why) did we stop being hunter-gatherers?
• When did inequality emerge?
• Why did some people decide to start living in cities?
• What led to the development of complex state-level
societies?
These are important questions about what it means to
be human that archaeologists address. In this course,
we’ll consider these topics while providing an
introduction to archaeology and the study of world
prehistory. The course provides an overview of human
prehistory from modern humans up to the
development of literate civilizations. The approach will
be problem oriented and comparative. We will
consider ancient cultures from around the world in
order to foster an appreciation for human cultural
diversity. Explaining why cultural developments
occurred is often hotly debated among archaeologists,
and different perspectives will be explored critically
throughout this course.

Subject:
Anthropology
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Dr. Alison Carter
Date Added:
03/15/2021
Arabic Transliteration Systems
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating
0.0 stars

This site provides a list of six Arabic transliteration systems. Such systems include the Abdelsalam Heddaya's Qalam System of Transliteration and the Transliteration System of the Encyclopaedia of Islam. Also included on this webpage are articles and translations published by Nicholas Heer, mostly regarding Sufi works, as well as other materials such a downloadable Qur'an, information on Jawi literature, and information on classes taught by Nicholas Heer.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
Nicholas Heer
Date Added:
10/14/2013
Art Appreciation - Introduction to Art & Art Media
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This entry-level course is designed to help you gain a general appreciation for art as well as to help you develop a working vocabulary for the knowledgeable analysis of art based on the Visual Elements and the Principles of Design. The syllabus is included in the course and contains the course objectives, student learning outcomes, list of assignments and names of the course textbooks.

Subject:
Art History
Graphic Arts
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
SkillsCommons
Author:
Kelly Joslin
Date Added:
01/20/2022
Art Appreciation and Techniques
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history, and in-depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative thought and processes. It is the only resource I have found that approximates techniques, media, and an overview of different processes that is usually the first half of a printed text on art appreciation or an introduction to art. This is geared toward an undergraduate, lower-level student population. The art history survey is inadequate, but combined with another source, like Boundless' art history, this can be a complete text for an Art 100 course.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Assessment
Lecture
Module
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Unit of Study
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Author:
Afshan Bokhari
Amy Gansell
Andrew E. Hershberger
Andrew Marvick
Anne Bertrand-Dewsnap
Denise Rogers
Hilda Werschkul
Jelena Bogdanovic
Jennifer Palinkas
Jill Kiefer
Lynn E. Roller
Marjorie Munsterberg
Michelle Greet
Shaoqian Zhang
Tracy Musacchio
William V. Ganis
Date Added:
05/27/2018
Art Appreciation and Techniques
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

This course is an exploration of visual art forms and their cultural connections for the student with little experience in the visual arts. It includes a brief study of art history and in depth studies of the elements, media, and methods used in creative processes and thought. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: interpret examples of visual art using a five-step critical process that includes description, analysis, context, meaning, and judgment; identify and describe the elements and principles of art; use analytical skills to connect formal attributes of art with their meaning and expression; explain the role and effect of the visual arts in societies, history, and other world cultures; articulate the political, social, cultural, and aesthetic themes and issues that artists examine in their work; identify the processes and materials involved in art and architectural production; utilize information to locate, evaluate, and communicate information about visual art in its various forms. Note that this course is an alternative to the Saylor FoundationĺÎĺ_ĺĚĺ_s ARTH101A and has been developed through a partnership with the Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges; the Saylor Foundation has modified some WSBCTC materials. This free course may be completed online at any time. (Art History 101B)

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
04/16/2012