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American Government
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

 American Government is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected Module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. American Government includes updated information on the 2016 presidential election.Senior Contributing AuthorsGlen Krutz (Content Lead), University of OklahomaSylvie Waskiewicz, PhD (Lead Editor)

Subject:
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
01/06/2016
American Government (POLS 202)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
Rating

This course covers American Government: the Constitution, the branches of government (Presidency, Congress, Judiciary) and how politics works: elections, voting, parties, campaigning, policy making. In addition weęll look at how the media, interest groups, public opinion polls and political self-identification (are you liberal or conservative, Democrat or Republican or something else?) impact politics and political choices. Weęll also cover the basics in economic, social and foreign policy and bring in current issues and show how they illustrate the process.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
05/03/2013
American Government, Students and the System, The Constitution and Its Origins, Introduction
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

The Pre-Revolutionary Period and the Roots of the American Political TraditionThe Articles of ConfederationThe Development of the ConstitutionThe Ratification of the ConstitutionConstitutional Change

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Date Added:
07/10/2017
Bill of Rights
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

On 12 September 1787, during the final days of the Constitutional Convention, George Mason of Virginia expressed the desire that the Constitution be prefaced by a Bill of Rights. Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts proposed a motion to form a committee to incorporate such a declaration of rights; however the motion was defeated. This lesson examines the First Congress's addition of a Bill of Rights as the first ten amendments to the Constitution.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Collections
Date Added:
02/16/2011
A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation, U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774-1873
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This site includes documents from the Continental Congress, the Constitutional Convention and ratification debates, and the first two federal congresses. These documents record American history in the words of those who built our government.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
American Memory
Date Added:
07/18/2000
Close Reading Exemplar: Words We Live By (Grade 8)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

By reading and re-reading the Constitutional passages closely combined with classroom discussion about it, students will explore the questions Monk raises and perhaps even pursue additional avenues of inquiry. When combined with writing about the passage and teacher feedback, students will form a deeper appreciation not only of MonkŐs argument and the value of struggling with complex text, but of the Preamble of the Constitution itself. This close reading exemplar is intended to model how teachers can support their students as they undergo the kind of careful reading the Common Core State Standards require. Teachers are encouraged to take these exemplars and modify them to suit the needs of their students.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
03/13/2015
The Constitutional Convention (TAH)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This Web Site provides a twelve-step guide to understanding the Constitutional Convention. The fundamental difficulty facing teachers and students of the Constitutional Convention of 1787 is how to make sense of the vast and complex material. The resources on this site help teachers teach the Convention and engage students with the conversation and arguments that took place over its four months. Primary sources, artwork, a dramatic reading and lesson plans are included.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Teaching American History
Date Added:
11/30/2013
Exploring Free Speech and Persuasion with Nothing But the Truth
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students read AviŐs "Nothing But the Truth" and examine the First Amendment and student rights, and then decide whether the rights of the novel's protagonist, Philip, are violated.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
10/02/2013
The Fish Wars: What Kinds of Actions Can Lead to Justice
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This online lesson provides perspectives from Native American community members and their supporters, images, news footage, an interactive timeline, and other sources about an important campaign to secure the treaty rights and sovereignty of Native Nations of the Pacific Northwest. Scroll to begin an exploration of the actions Native Nations took to address injustices.

Subject:
History
Physical Geography
Social Science
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Lesson
Module
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Author:
Native Knowledge 360
Date Added:
08/08/2018
Japanese-American Internment
Conditions of Use:
Remix and Share
Rating

In this lesson, students will experience the internment of Japanese Americans from San Francisco's Fillmore neighborhood. By connecting local experiences with national events, students will understand both the constitutional issues at stake and the human impact of this government policy.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
KQED Education
Provider Set:
KQED Education Network
Date Added:
01/01/2001
Making the Revolution, America 1763-1791: Primary Sources
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The National Humanities center presents reading guides with primary source materials for the study of America in 1763-1791: The Making the Revolution. Primary source materials include letters, diaries, journals, poems, paintings, maps, pamphlets, sermons, petitions, broadsides, cartoons, and more. Resources are divided into the topics: Crisis, Rebellion, War, Independence, and Constitution.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
National Humanities Center
Provider Set:
America In Class
Date Added:
01/07/2013
A More Perfect Union: Japanese Americans and the U.S. Constitution
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This activity “Becoming aware of the Japanese American Internment Camp Experience” is intended to help students become aware of, and sensitive to, the Japanese American interment camp experience. They will develop a sense of empathy by simulating the situations which Japanese American children faced.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Provider Set:
National Museum of American History
Date Added:
09/28/2004
Peace Be Upon You
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Explore the separation of church and state with regards to school prayer and religious tolerance. This lesson is an exercise in Constitutional law, judicial process, critical thinking, persuasive writing and public speaking. It is best conducted over a period of weeks. Teachers may need to adapt the activity to meet time constraints or to overcome limitations that class size might present.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
02/20/2013
Preparing Students for College, Career and Citizenship
Rating

A California Guide to Align Civic Education and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects. This resource guide provides educators with practices to equip all students with reading, writing, listening and speaking skills and the knowledge, skills and dispositions to become responsible engaged citizens of the 21st century in a coherent, integrated manner that will be meaningful and relevant. The practices in the guide provide civic education approaches to meet the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts. The lesson activities in each of the grade spans follow a natural progression that builds students’ historical knowledge of the foundations of democracy, an understanding of how America’s constitutional principles are reinterpreted over time, and the skills and dispositions needed for effective citizenship. Applied knowledge of history, government and civics is necessary for developing civic competency. Therefore, each series of lessons calls for students to actively participate in activities that strengthen reading, writing, speaking and listening skills in the context of civic dialogue, debate, persuasion and action.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Reading Foundation Skills
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Los Angeles County Office of Education
OER Commons
Provider Set:
Common Core Reference Collection
Date Added:
03/01/2012
Reading Like a Historian, Unit 3: Revolution and Early America
Rating

The Revolution and Early America Unit covers the standard eighteenth century topics that would appear in any textbook. These lessons, however, will push students to dig deeper as they read the documents and develop historical arguments about topics ranging from the Great Awakening (why was George Whitefield so popular?) to the Stamp Act (why were Colonists upset about the Stamp Act?) to the Constitution (why did the Founding Fathers keep slavery in the Constitution?). Each lesson offers primary documents that promote conflicting interpretations. The unit will introduce students to historiography, as they contrast Bernard Bailyn's interpretaton of the Declaration of Independence to Howard Zinn's account. These lessons will emphasize the historical reading skills students will practice all year.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Stanford History Education Group
Provider Set:
Reading Like a Historian
Date Added:
08/14/2012
The Sioux Treaty of 1868
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This lesson examines Native American sovereignty and the Constitutional power granted to the president and the Senate to make treaties with foreign nations. The site presents the Treaty and related documents, including a photograph of the Indian leader, Spotted Tail. Explanatory text, materials for teachers, and links to further resources accompany the documents.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Date Added:
08/24/2000
U.S. Constitution Workshop
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This is a self-service online workshop for teachers who use primary documents to help students see the impact and ongoing relevance of the Constitution. It requires little advance preparation and provides everything needed, including a vocabulary list, document analysis worksheets, and historical documents -- John Marshall's Supreme Court nomination (1801), proclamation to New Orleans (1803), Lincoln's telegram to Grant (1864), Johnson oath photo (1963), and more.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
Teaching With Documents
Date Added:
10/27/2006