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  • Immigration
19th Century Immigration - Causes & Effects
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Public Domain
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Students will examine and interpret a population chart published in 1898 — depicting changes in the makeup of the United States across time in three categories, “foreign stock,” “native stock,” and “colored” — as well as an 1893 political cartoon about immigration. Students will also explain the causes and effects of population change in the late 19th century.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
10/18/2019
25f. Irish and German Immigration
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In the middle half of the nineteenth century, more than one-half of the population of Ireland emigrated to the United States. So did an equal number of Germans. Most of them came because of civil unrest, severe unemployment or almost inconceivable hardships at home. This wave of immigration affected almost every city and almost every person in America. From 1820 to 1870, over seven and a half million immigrants came to the United States — more than the entire population of the country in 1810. Nearly all of them came from northern and western Europe — about a third from Ireland and almost a third from Germany. Burgeoning companies were able to absorb all that wanted to work. Immigrants built canals and constructed railroads. They became involved in almost every labor-intensive endeavor in the country. Much of the country was built on their backs.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
38c. The Rush of Immigrants
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Immigration was nothing new to America. Except for Native Americans, all United States citizens can claim some immigrant experience, whether during prosperity or despair, brought by force or by choice. However, immigration to the United States reached its peak from 1880-1920. The so-called "old immigration" brought thousands of Irish and German people to the New World.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
Date Added:
12/03/2014
8th grade: My place in history
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator: Michael Freydin: Adaptable to other grades. Cumulative assignment for the end of the year. During previous lessons, student have evaluated their own place in history, and in our nation’s history. This final project builds on their understanding of history by conduct an interview to connect neighborhood/family history to world history events.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/25/2019
AP World/H4 Family History Project
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator: Sean McManamon to meet NYC Social Studies Scope and Sequence  for World History. Adaptable to other grades. Cumulative assignment for the end of the year. Assignment asks students to connect family history interview to World History periodization.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/25/2019
AP World History: Japanese Internment Project
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator David Richman for his AP World History course. Adaptable to US History. Adaptable to other grades. Assignments ask students research the effects Executive Order 9066 had on families of Japanese descent, to analyze primary sources, and to create an illustrated story book detailing Ms. Wakatsuki’s time spent at Manzanar, a Japanese internment camp.

Subject:
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/30/2019
Remix
The African American “Great Migration” and New European Immigration
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

By the end of this section, you will be able to:Identify the factors that prompted African American and European immigration to American cities in the late nineteenth centuryExplain the discrimination and anti-immigration legislation that immigrants faced in the late nineteenth century

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Samuel Finesurrey
Date Added:
05/24/2020
After Ellis Island
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

A PowerPoint presentation that takes students through a choose-your-own adventure style activity simulating the life choices of Jewish immigrants to the United States in the late 19th/early 20th century.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
History
Social Science
Material Type:
Simulation
Author:
Troy Podell
Date Added:
03/16/2018
American Me: My Story, Their Story and Our Story
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator Kenneth Porter for his Senior Leadership class. We all have different stories, reasons and various paths that we personally took or our relatives traversed to arrive at this nation of ours. This assignment tasks the student with researching the story of a relative/guardian who emigrated to this country. The student will learn the when, the what, the why and the how behind their story, in order to reveal to the student more about their own story.

Subject:
World Cultures
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/26/2019
The Beveridge Vision
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This Unit looks at the work of William Beveridge in reforming the field of social welfare after World War II. Particular attention is paid to the attitude towards women and immigrants to the United Kingdom.

Subject:
Social Work
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
Border Walls
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CC BY-SA
Rating

This inquiry examines the 20th century history of migration from Mexico to the United States and recent efforts to limit the movement of people across the southern U.S. border. The inquiry takes its inspiration from a 2018 podcast episode by Malcom Gladwell titled, “General Chapman’s Last Stand.” The podcast is part of Gladwell’s Revisionist History series (http://revisionisthistory.com). In the podcast, Gladwell tells the story of General Leonard F. Chapman Jr., Commandant of the Marine Corps during the Vietnam War, who went on to serve as the Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) from 1972 to 1975. Chapman is credited with reforming the INS into a more efficient and effective agency, but Gladwell argues that Chapman’s efforts also led to an unintentional increase in unauthorized immigrants. In 1970, 760,000 Mexican immigrants, or 1.4% of Mexico’s population, lived in the U.S. By 2008, there were 12.7 million Mexican immigrants in the U.S. which amounted to 11% of all people born in Mexico; an increase of almost 800% in less than 30 years. The question of how and why this happened is the central focus of this inquiry.

Subject:
U.S. History
Social Science
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Primary Source
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Date Added:
03/11/2019
Chinese Exclusion Act
Read the Fine Print
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Starting with the Gold Rush, Chinese migrated to California and other regions of the United States in search of work. As several photographs show, many Chinese found work in the gold mines and on the railroads. They accepted $32.50 a month to work on the Union Pacific in Wyoming in 1870 for the same job that paid white workers $52 a month. This led to deep resentment by the whites, who felt the Chinese were competing unfairly for jobs. White labor unions blamed the Chinese for lower wages and lack of jobs, and anti-Chinese feelings grew. The cartoon "You Know How It Is Yourself" expresses this sentiment. Several political cartoons in this topic are graphic representations of racism and conflicts between whites and Chinese. "Won't They Remain Here in Spite of the New Constitution?" shows a demonized figure of political corruption protecting Chinese cheap labor, dirty politicians, capital, and financiers. "The Tables Turned" shows Denis Kearney (head of the Workingman's Party of California, a union that had criticized Chinese laborers) in jail, being taunted by Chinese men. In 1880, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed the Chinese Exclusion Treaty, which placed strict limitations on the number of Chinese allowed to enter the United States and the number allowed to become naturalized citizens. In 1882, Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which prohibited immigration from China (The Act was not repealed until 1943). The two-part cartoon from the July-December 1882 issue of The Wasp reflects how some citizens saw the situation. After the Act was passed, anti-Chinese violence increased. One illustration depicts the Rock Springs Massacre of 1885, a Wyoming race riot in which 28 Chinese were killed by British and Swedish miners. The "Certificate of Residence" document illustrates that Chinese individuals were required to prove their residence in the United States prior to the passage of the Exclusion Act. The poster offering a reward for Wong Yuk, a Chinese man, makes it clear that the United States was actively deporting Chinese. Despite discrimination and prejudice, this first wave of immigrants established thriving communities. Photographs taken in San Francisco's Chinatown show prosperous businesses, such as the "Chinese Butcher and Grocery Shop." Wealthy merchants formed active business associations, represented by the image "Officers of the Chinese Six Companies." The Chinese celebrated their heritage by holding cultural festivals, as shown in the photograph from 1896. The photographs "Children of High Class," "Golden Gate Park," and "Chinese Passengers on Ferry" are evidence that some Chinese adopted Western-style clothing while others wore more traditional attire.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Reading
Provider:
University of California
Provider Set:
Calisphere - California Digital Library
Date Added:
04/25/2013
Columbus and the Clash of Cultures
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Educational Use
Rating

In small groups and class discussion, students share knowledge about Christopher Columbus and his voyages, learn about the impact of Columbus, and consider some ecological and political results of the encounter.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
Author:
Maxine Phillips
Date Added:
10/08/2014
Common Core Curriculum Grade 2 ELA: Listening and Learning Strand
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The Listening and Learning Strand consists of a series of read_alouds organized by topics (called domains), many of which are informational in nature. The goal of the Listening and Learning Strand is for students to acquire language competence through listening, specifically building a rich vocabulary, and broad knowledge in history and science by being exposed to carefully selected, sequenced, and coherent read_alouds. The 9 units (or domains) provide lessons (including images and texts), as well as instructional objectives, core vocabulary, and assessment materials. The domain topics include: Fighting for a Cause; Fairy Tales and Tall Tales; Cycles in Nature; Insects; Ancient Greek Civilizations; Greek Myths; Charlotte's Web; and Immigration.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Informational Text
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
EngageNY
Date Added:
04/04/2013
Critical Perspectives on Migration in the Twenty-First Century
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CC BY-NC
Rating

Thousands of people risk their lives daily by crossing borders in search of a better life. During 2015, over one million of these people arrived in Europe. Images of refugees in distress became headline news in what was considered to be the worst humanitarian crisis in Europe since 1945. This book provides a critical overview of recent migration flows and offers answers as to why people flee, what happens during their flight and investigates the various responses to mass migratory movements. Divided in two parts, the book addresses long-running academic, policy and domestic debates, drawing on case studies of migration in Europe, the Middle East and the Asia-Pacific. Coming from a variety of different fields, the contributors provide an interdisciplinary approach and open the discussion on the reasons why migration should be examined critically.

Subject:
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
E-International Relations
Author:
Jakob Steiner
Laura Southgate
Marianna Karakoulari
Date Added:
03/08/2019
EconGuy Videos: Immigrants and Jobs
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Many people think that immigrants take jobs from Americans. But is that true? Turns out there isn't a fixed number of jobs to be fought over by Americans and immigrants. Immigrants actually end up creating more jobs for Americans - find out how.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Saint Michael's College
Provider Set:
EconGuy Videos
Author:
Patrick Walsh
Date Added:
11/29/2013
The Economics of Immigration: A Story of Substitutes and Complements
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

America is a nation of immigrants, who currently make up about 13 percent of the overall population. The May 2014 issue shows how immigration affects the average American. The essay weighs the costs and benefits of immigration and discusses the concept of immigrant workers as substitutes for and complements to native-born workers.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lesson
Reading
Provider:
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Provider Set:
Page One Economics
Author:
Scott A. Wolla
Date Added:
10/09/2014
English Language Arts, Grade 12
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Global Issues
Rating

Who decides who among us is civilized? What rules should govern immigration into the United States? Whom should we let in? Keep out? What should we do about political refugees or children without papers? What if they would be a drain on our economy?

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read William Shakespeare’s play The Tempest and write a short argument about who in the play is truly civilized.
Students participate in a mock trial in which they argue for or against granting asylum to a teenage refugee, and then they write arguments in favor of granting asylum to one refugee and against granting it to another.
Students read an Independent Reading text and write an informational essay about a global issue and how that relates to their book.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What role do national identity, custom, religion, and other locally held beliefs play in a world increasingly characterized by globalization?
How does Shakespeare’s view of human rights compare with that in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights?
Who is civilized? Who decides what civilization is or how it’s defined?
How do we behave toward and acknowledge those whose culture is different from our own?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Global Issues, Contemporary Issues, Discussing Xenophobia
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CC BY-NC
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In this lesson, students will write about how their Independent Reading book addresses the unit’s Guiding Questions, and they’ll share their responses with a partner. Students will begin writing a narrative about a time when they were afraid. They’ll also discuss xenophobia.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Global Issues, Contemporary Issues, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

In this lesson, students will share their drafts of their fear narratives and give feedback in small groups. They’ll have class time to revise and complete a final draft. They’ll revisit the Universal Declaration of Human Rights to see what the document says about immigrants and refugees.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Exploring Young Immigrant Stories | Teaching Tolerance - Diversity, Equity and Justice
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating

Objectives:

Students will understand similarities and differences between themselves and others.

Students will recognize and value diversity among their peers.

Students will recognize and value the diverse experience of immigrants and of children from other countries.

Students will read and understand visual texts.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
04/06/2017
Family Immigration History Research Project
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator Marc Shoichet for Grade 10 Global History Course; Adaptable to other grades. During the year, we explore world history by analyzing the causes of events, understanding why they occurred, and comparing these events as well as the outcomes; in this end-of-year assignment we explore the relationship of our families/ancestors and neighborhood changes to the events of world history.

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/27/2019
Family Ties
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating

About 4 million undocumented immigrant women live and work in the United States. They live in fear of job-site immigration raids and deportations, which result in personal and economic costs both here and back home. In this lesson, students will learn how current immigration policies are tied to those costs.

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
11/30/2016
Foreigners Are Our Friends: Free Trade and Open Borders
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

According to Professor Bryan Caplan of George Mason University, many people suffer from "anti-foreign bias", believing that countries should prioritize goods made within their own borders and limit immigration to preserve jobs for citizens. In this video, Professor Caplan explains how trade and immigration actually increase wealth for everyone.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Bryan Caplan
Date Added:
10/31/2017
Global Media Perspectives
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
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This kit provides the materials and background information needed to engage students in a dynamic and constructive process of learning how global media perspectives differ based on country of production, media source, target audience, and political and social context. There are five lessons representing important issues and media documents from: Africa (news and documentary film clips about the food crisis), Latin America (editorial cartoons about immigration), Europe (news and documentary film clips about Islam and cultural identity), India (magazine covers about India's rise in the global economy), and Southeast Asia (websites concerning Islamic majorities and minorities).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World Cultures
Journalism
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Sox Sperry
Date Added:
04/30/2013
Remix
Heart of the Harvest: GoPro POV Perspective of Migrant Harvesting
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Immigration has been a touchstone of the American experience since the country’s founding. As part of this group, migrant workers are a large part of the workforce.
GoPro Challenge has now allowed educators and curriculum designers to use GoPro equipment to capture the ordinary world in ways that have never been seen before. The intimate look at the POV world of migrant workers in action, GoPro and virtual learning platforms together have the power to illuminate cultural, social, and political issues for students and teachers alike.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Author:
Allison R. Barajas
Date Added:
08/08/2019
Hispanic Heritage and History in the United States
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Since 1988, the U.S. Government has set aside the period from September 15 to October 15 as National Hispanic Heritage Month to honor the many contributions Hispanic Americans have made and continue to make to the United States of America. Our Teacher's Guide brings together resources created during NEH Summer Seminars and Institutes, lesson plans for K-12 classrooms, and think pieces on events and experiences across Hispanic history and heritage.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
History
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
National Endowment for the Humanities
Provider Set:
EDSITEment!
Date Added:
09/06/2019
Homeland Security: Safeguarding the U.S. Against Domestic Catastrophic Destruction
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-ND
Rating

What is homeland security and why do we need it? What was unique about the 9/11 attacks that prompted the largest reorganization of the Federal government since the end of World War II? What is the difference between homeland security and national security? Why is critical infrastructure protection so critical? Why is emergency management an essential mission area within homeland security? What is the relationship between homeland security and DoD, National Guard, FBI, and State and Local law enforcement? Explore these questions and the events that made homeland security what it is today. Find out why homeland security is an unprecedented historical challenge requiring an unprecedented government response. Review the homeland security mission areas and understand not only what is being done but also why. Discover “who’s who and what do they do” within the Department of Homeland Security and the greater Homeland Security Enterprise. This book provides the most comprehensive overview and most concise resource for understanding homeland security today. Within these pages you will find insight to the most pressing challenges of the 21st century confronting the nation, your community, and you.

Subject:
Management
Criminal Justice
U.S. History
Law
Political Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Tina Bynum
Date Added:
06/17/2019
How Does Immigration Shape the Nation’s Identity?
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
Rating

In this lesson, students consider what it means to be an American, using an opinion piece about the “American Identity Crisis” and several related videos as central texts. They answer a series of text-dependent questions, debate their opinions, write a brief constructed response, and make their own video that reflects their interpretation of “the face of America.”

Subject:
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Southern Poverty Law Center
Provider Set:
Teaching Tolerance
Date Added:
11/30/2016
Immigración, Spanish, Advanced
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Students will participate in a discussion about immigration to the United States. After agreeing to be respectful regarding discussion and the conversation on immigration, students will take a Kahoot Immigration Myth quiz about misconceptions they might have about immigration to the United States. Students will also watch a video, journal their thoughts on the video, and in groups, create a poster to share their thoughts with the class.

Subject:
Languages
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Amber Hoye
Camille Daw
Date Added:
09/05/2019
Immigrant and Refugee Families: Global Perspectives on Displacement and Resettlement Experiences
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Immigrant and Refugee Families: Global Perspectives on Displacement and Resettlement Experiences uses a family systems lens to discuss challenges and strengths of immigrant and refugee families in the United States. Chapters address immigration policy, human rights issues, economic stress, mental health and traumatic stress, domestic violence, substance abuse, family resilience, and methods of integration.

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing
Author:
Catherine Solheim
Elizabeth Wieling
Jaime Ballard
Date Added:
12/07/2018
Immigration Mapping Project
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Created by NHPRC Teacher Participant/Creator Jeremy Mellema, for his US Government class, Adaptable to other courses and grades. This immigration mapping project asks the student to create 3 maps, and to gather data through research and conducting an interview. Finally, students write an essay connecting what they have learned from this project to American Democracy, and to current immigration law or events.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Kathryn Shaughnessy
Date Added:
09/30/2019
Immigration Nation
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

Students will examine data on the number of immigrants in the United States, to create bar graphs and line graphs with appropriate scales. Students will then compare and analyze their graphs to draw conclusions about the data.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
U.S. Census Bureau
Provider Set:
Statistics in Schools
Date Added:
10/15/2019
Immigration and Americanization, 1880-1930
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore immigration to the US and immigrant Americanization between 1880 and 1930. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
Literature
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Ella Howard
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Immigration to Iowa
Rating

This website provides a general overview of the history of immigration to Iowa. It also provides several primary sources that address the following questions. Why do people move or choose to immigrate? What did immigrants experience when they arrived in America? How does one's culture influence where they choose to live?

Subject:
World Cultures
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Date Added:
07/13/2020