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  • Consumption
American Consumer Culture, Fall 2007
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This class examines how and why twentieth-century Americans came to define the ‰ŰĎgood life‰Ű through consumption, leisure, and material abundance. We will explore how such things as department stores, nationally advertised brand-name goods, mass-produced cars, and suburbs transformed the American economy, society, and politics. The course is organized both thematically and chronologically. Each period deals with a new development in the history of consumer culture. Throughout we explore both celebrations and critiques of mass consumption and abundance.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Marketing
U.S. History
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Jacobs, Meg
Date Added:
01/01/2007
Behavioral Economics and Finance, Spring 2004
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Surveys research which incorporates psychological evidence into economics. Prospect theory. Biases in probabilistic judgment. Self-control and mental accounting with implications for consumption and savings. Fairness, altruism, and public goods contributions. Financial market anomalies and theories. Impact of markets, learning, and incentives. Some evidence on memory, attention, categorization, and the thinking process.

Subject:
Finance
Economics
Psychology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Gabaix, Xavier
Date Added:
01/01/2004
The Challenge of World Poverty, Spring 2011
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This is a course for those who are interested in the challenge posed by massive and persistent world poverty, and are hopeful that economists might have something useful to say about this challenge. The questions we will take up include: Is extreme poverty a thing of the past? What is economic life like when living under a dollar per day? Why do some countries grow fast and others fall further behind? Does growth help the poor? Are famines unavoidable? How can we end child labor - or should we? How do we make schools work for poor citizens? How do we deal with the disease burden? Is micro finance invaluable or overrated? Without property rights, is life destined to be "nasty, brutish and short"? Has globalization been good to the poor? Should we leave economic development to the market? Should we leave economic development to non-governmental organizations (NGOs)? Does foreign aid help or hinder? Where is the best place to intervene?

Subject:
Finance
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Abhijit Banerjee
Esther Duflo
Date Added:
01/01/2011
Economic & Environmental Issues in Materials Selection, Fall 2005
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Choice of material has implications throughout the life-cycle of a product, influencing many aspects of economic and environmental performance. This course will provide a survey of methods for evaluating those implications. Lectures will cover topics in material choice concepts, fundamentals of engineering economics, manufacturing economics modeling methods, and life-cycle environmental evaluation.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Manufacturing
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Kirchain, Randolph
Date Added:
01/01/2005
The Economic History of Work and Family, Spring 2005
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Explores the changing map of the public and the private in pre-industrial and modern societies and examines how that map affected men's and women's production and consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, is another major theme. How did an ideal of the "domestic" arise in the early modern west, and to what extent did it limit the economic position of women? How has it been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period? Focuses on western Europe since the Middle Ages and on the United States, but some attention to how these issues have played themselves out in non-Western cultures. This course will explore the relation of women and men in both pre-industrial and modern societies to the changing map of public and private (household) work spaces, examining how that map affected their opportunities for both productive activity and the consumption of goods and leisure. The reproductive strategies of women, either in conjunction with or in opposition to their families, will be the third major theme of the course. We will consider how a place and an ideal of the "domestic" arose in the early modern west, to what extent it was effective in limiting the economic position of women, and how it has been challenged, and with what success, in the post-industrial period. Finally, we will consider some of the policy implications for contemporary societies as they respond to changes in the composition of the paid work force, as well as to radical changes in their national demographic profiles. Although most of the material for the course will focus on western Europe since the Middle Ages and on the United States, we will also consider how these issues have played themselves out in non-western cultures.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
McCants, Anne Elizabeth Conger
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Energy Conservation
Conditions of Use:
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Students are introduced to the idea that energy use impacts the environment and our wallets. They discuss different types of renewable and nonrenewable energy sources, as well as the impacts of energy consumption. Through a series of activities, students understand how they use energy and how it is transformed from one type to another. They learn innovative ways engineers conserve energy and how energy can be conserved in their homes.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise W. Carlson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Natalie Mach
Sharon D. Perez-Suarez
Date Added:
09/18/2014
Finance & Economics: Present Value 4 (and Discounted Cash Flow)
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This 10-minute video lesson suggests that we change the discount rates depending on how far out the payments are. This is the final of a 4-part series on Present Value. [Core Finance playlist: Lesson 6 of 184]

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Khan Academy
Author:
Khan, Salman
Date Added:
02/20/2011
Food Webs Activity: Producers, Consumers, Decomposers (Grades 6-8)
Conditions of Use:
No Strings Attached
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Students become “experts” and make creative presentations about the different ecological roles of producers, consumers, and decomposers at local and global scales.

Subject:
Ecology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Encyclopedia of Life
Author:
Encyclopedia of Life Learning + Education
Date Added:
07/21/2017
Food and Power in the Twentieth Century, Spring 2005
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In this class, food serves as both the subject and the object of historical analysis. As a subject, food has been transformed over the last 100 years, largely as a result of ever more elaborate scientific and technological innovations. From a need to preserve surplus foods for leaner times grew an elaborate array of techniques -- drying, freezing, canning, salting, etc -- that changed not only what people ate, but how far they could/had to travel, the space in which they lived, their relations with neighbors and relatives, and most of all, their place in the economic order of things. The role of capitalism in supporting and extending food preservation and development was fundamental. As an object, food offers us a way into cultural, political, economic, and techno-scientific history. Long ignored by historians of science and technology, food offers a rich source for exploring, e.g., the creation and maintenance of mass-production techniques, industrial farming initiatives, the politics of consumption, vertical integration of business firms, globalization, changing race and gender identities, labor movements, and so forth. How is food different in these contexts, from other sorts of industrial goods? What does the trip from farm to table tell us about American culture and history?

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Fitzgerald, Deborah
Date Added:
01/01/2005
Global Nomads Group: Consume with a Conscience Curriculum (One Week Lesson Plan)
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As global consumers, how do we impact the environment, and communities around the world? Students will learn more about sustainable management practices and what certification on agricultural goods actually means.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Global Nomads Group: Sustainable Energy Curriculum (Semester-Long Program)
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How can we, as youth, build a sustainable future while meeting the energy needs of today? The Path to Sustainable Energy (PaSE) curriculum explores sustainable energy as students investigate place-based energy resource and consumption issues, gather resources, and build leadership skills to identify and take action on shared challenges and impacts of energy usage.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Social Science
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Global Nomads Group (GNG)
Date Added:
01/28/2016
Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory, Spring 2004
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Survey of modern macroeconomics at a fairly advanced level. Topics include neoclassical and new growth theory, consumption and saving behavior, investment, and unemployment. Use of the dynamic programming techniques. Assignments include problem sets and written discussions of macroeconomic events. Recommended for students planning to apply to graduate school in economics. Credit not given for both 14.05 and 14.06.

Subject:
Finance
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Angeletos, Marios
Date Added:
01/01/2004
Intermediate Macroeconomics
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In this course, the student will build on and apply what you learned in the introductory macroeconomics course. The student will use the concepts of output, unemployment, inflation, consumption, and investment to study the dynamics of an economy at a more advanced level. As the course progresses, the student will gain a better appreciation for how policy shifts and changes in one sector impact the rest of the macroeconomy (whether the impacts are intended or unintended). The student will also examine the causes of inflation and depression, and discuss various approaches to responding to them. By the end of this course, the student should be able to think critically about the economy and develop your own unique perspective on various issues. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain the standard theory in macroeconomics at an intermediate level; Explain and use the basic tools of macroeconomic theory, and apply them to help address problems in public policy; Analyze the role of government in allocating scarce resources; Explain how inflation affects entire economic systems; Synthesize the impact of employment and unemployment in a free market economy; Build macroeconomic models to describe changes over time in monetary and fiscal policy; Compare and contrast arguments concerning business, consumers and government, and make good conjectures regarding the possible solutions; Analyze the methods of computing and explaining how much is produced in an economy; Apply basic tools that are used in many fields of economics, including uncertainty, capital and investment, and economic growth. (Economics 202)

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/18/2011
The Little Red Hen Makes a Pizza
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Students learn about consumers and producers and give examples from the book The Little Red Hen Makes a Pizza. They become producers by making bookmarks. The students draw pictures on their bookmarks of something that happened at the beginning, in the middle, and at the end of the story. They become consumers when they use their bookmarks to mark a page in a book they are reading.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Economics
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Provider Set:
Economic Lowdown Lessons
Author:
Bonnie Meszaros
Della Hoffman
Date Added:
09/11/2019
Macroeconomics: Theory, Models, and Policy
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Macroeconomics: Theory, Markets, and Policy by D. Curtis and I. Irvine provides complete, concise coverage of introductory macroeconomics theory and policy.

The textbook observes short-run macroeconomic performance, analysis, and policy motivated by the recessions of the early 1980s and 1990s, the financial crisis and recession of 2008-2009, and the prolonged recovery in most industrial countries.

A traditional Aggregate Demand and Supply (AD-AS) model is introduced, and a basic modern AD-AS model is developed.

Numerical examples, diagrams, and basic algebra are used in combination to illustrate and explain economic relationships. Students learn about: the importance of trade flows, consumption, and government budgets; money supply; financial asset prices, yields, and interest rates; employment and unemployment; and other key relationships in the economy. Canadian and selected international data are used to provide real world examples and comparisons.

This textbook is intended for a one-semester course, and can be used in a two-semester sequence with the companion textbook, Microeconomics: Markets, Methods, and Models. The three introductory chapters and the International Trade chapter (Chapter 15) are common to both textbooks.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Textbook
Provider:
Lyryx Learning
Author:
Douglas Curtis
Ian Irvine
Date Added:
08/29/2018
Meat and Sustainability
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Every German consumes an average of nearly 90 kg of meat every year. This is way too much and problematic in many ways. Industrialized production of meat is unsustainable in many ways, it affects: Land consumption, food security, climate change, animal rights, pollution and health.

But what exactly are the problems of industrial meat production? What are the global implications? And what can be done about?

Realization: edeos- digital education
http://www.edeos.org/en

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Life Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
edeos - digital education
Date Added:
12/14/2016
Microeconomics: Markets, Methods, and Models
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Microeconomics: Markets, Methods, and Models by D. Curtis and I. Irvine provides concise yet complete coverage of introductory microeconomic theory, application and policy. The text begins with an explanation and development of the standard tools of analysis in the discipline and carries on to investigate the meaning of ‘well-being’ in the context of an efficient use of the economy’s resources.

An understanding of individual optimizing behaviour is developed, and this behaviour is in turn used to link household decisions on savings with firms’ decisions on production, expansion and investment. The text then explores behaviour in a variety of different market structures. The role of the government is examined, and the key elements in the modern theory of international trade are developed.

Opportunity cost, a global economy and behavioural responses to incentives are the dominant themes. Examples are domestic and international in their subject matter and are of the modern era.

This text is intended for a one-semester course, and can be used in a two-semester sequence with the companion text, Macroeconomics: Theory, Markets, and Policy. The three introductory chapters and the International Trade chapter (Chapter 15) are common to both books.

Subject:
Economics
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Textbook
Provider:
Lyryx Learning
Author:
Douglas Curtis
Ian Irvine
Date Added:
02/01/2018
Principles of Macroeconomics, Spring 2014
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"This course is designed to introduce classic macroeconomic issues such as growth, inflation, unemployment, interest rates, exchange rates, technological progress, and budget deficits. The course will provide a unified framework to address these issues and to study the impact of different policies, such as monetary and fiscal policies, on the aggregate behavior of individuals. These analytical tools will be used to understand the recent experience of the United States and other countries and to address how current policy initiatives affect their macroeconomic performance."

Subject:
Business and Communication
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Francesco Giavazzi
Date Added:
01/01/2014
Resource Depletion
Rating

This kit covers a historical overview of American representations of natural resources from ancient Indian basketry to contemporary web sites. It compares conflicting media constructions about the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the damning of rivers, and Chukchi sea oil drilling. By showing the slow realization that natural resources are finite, students will learn valuable lessons in earth, natural and environmental sciences.

Subject:
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Homework/Assignment
Lesson Plan
Reading
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Provider:
Ithaca College
Provider Set:
Project Look Sharp
Author:
Sox Sperry
Date Added:
04/30/2013
Rolling Blackouts & Environmental Impact: What Are Our Electricity Options?
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Through this activity, students come to understand the environmental design considerations required when generating electricity. The electric power that we use every day at home and work is usually generated by a variety of power plants. Power plants are engineered to utilize the conversion of one form of energy to another. The main components of a power plant are an input source of energy that is used to turn large turbines, and a method to convert the turbine rotation into electricity. The input sources of energy include fossil fuels (coal, natural gas and oil), wind, water, nuclear materials and refuse. This activity focuses on how much energy can be converted to electricity from many of these input sources. It also considers the impact of the by-products associated with using these natural resources, and looks at electricity requirements. To do this, students research and evaluate the electricity needs of their community, the available local resources for generating electricity, and the impact of using those resources.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Date Added:
09/18/2014
The Roots of Energy Efficiency: Smart Energy and the State of Energy Efficiency
Conditions of Use:
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Are smart meters and smart appliances at the consumer level and smart installations at the commercial level making an impact on statewide consumption? Learn what the rollout of smart energy infrastructure in California is showing us and the vision for leveraging these investments to achieve deep energy savings. (56 minutes)

Subject:
Environmental Science
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
U.C. Davis
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
03/12/2012
Wasting Energy at Home
Conditions of Use:
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People use energy in all aspects of their lives for cooking, lighting and entertainment. Much of this energy use takes place in buildings, such as our homes. To save money and reduce the impact on our environment, many people are reducing their energy use. One way is to hire engineers to perform home energy audits to understand the ways we use energy and identify ways we can conserve energy. In this activity, students act as energy conservation engineers and identify the ways energy is conserved or wasted. They also learn many ways to personally conserve energy everyday.

Subject:
Engineering
Environmental Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
TeachEngineering
Provider Set:
TeachEngineering
Author:
Denise Carlson
Malinda Schaefer Zarske
Natalie Mach
Sharon D. Perez-Suarez
Date Added:
10/14/2015
Water Efficiency Saves Energy
Conditions of Use:
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A report by the Natural Resources Defense Council, explores the water-energy connection through the topic of greenhouse gas emissions.

Subject:
Hydrology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
PBS
Provider Set:
Natural Resources
Date Added:
03/01/2009