Search Resources

61 Results

View
Selected filters:
  • Argument
10 Things You Can Do with ArcGIS Online and Story Maps
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Several new content pieces invite you to do hands-on work with web GIS technology:

[1] 10 Things you can do with ArcGIS Online in education. These include: (1) Use web mapping applications. (2) Make your own map. (3) Get a school, club, or university organizational account in ArcGIS Online. (4) Use and modify existing curricular resources. (5) Explore the Living Atlas of the World. (6) Modify and ask questions of maps. (7) Conduct spatial analysis on mapped data. (8) Add multimedia to maps. (9) Explore your world in 3D, and (10) Map and analyze field-collected data.

[2] Introduction and Advanced Work with Story Maps: Slides and hands-on exercises. These include how to build a story map from a web map, and how to build map tours, map journals, swipe, series, and other types of story maps.

[3] Teaching with Web Apps. Set of resources and activities. These include examining Pacific typhoons in 3D, demographics of Zip Codes, creating viewsheds and buffers, and much more.

[4] Spatial Analysis in Human Geography. These include the 1854 cholera epidemic in London (activity), a Boulder County hazards analysis (map), and an examination of the Human Development Index around the world (map).


I created this content for the Esri mapping lab for the 2017 National Conference on Geography Education, but it can also be used to support your own professional development or for your own instruction.

Subject:
Physical Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Data Set
Author:
Joseph J. Kerski
Date Added:
10/30/2017
Analytical and Argumentative Writing Syllabus
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

WR122 continues the focus of WR 121 on academic writing as a means of inquiry with added emphasis on persuasion and argument supported by external research; it also uses critical reading, discussion and the writing process to explore ideas, develop cultural awareness and formulate original positions. The course emphasizes development of writing and critical thinking through logical reasoning, rhetorical control, independent research, and information literacy.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Syllabus
Author:
Porter Raper
Date Added:
05/19/2020
Argument: Build It With Care
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Argument is a familiar concept to most people; however, to win an argument, or at least, to argue points effectively is not so easy. In this seminar, you will learn the basic concepts surrounding argument and, in turn, develop an argument utilizing components that set you up for success. Remember, argument does not mean yelling at someone because you think you’re right; argument refers to logical thinking with clear points, building toward a specific outcome.StandardsCC.1.2.9-10.H: Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing the validity of reasoning and relevance of evidence.CC.1.4.9-10.C: Develop and analyze the topic with relevant, well-chosen, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic; include graphics and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.CC.1.4.9-10.G: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/14/2017
Remix
Argument: Build It With Care
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Argument is a familiar concept to most people; however, to win an argument, or at least, to argue points effectively is not so easy. In this seminar, you will learn the basic concepts surrounding argument and, in turn, develop an argument utilizing components that set you up for success. Remember, argument does not mean yelling at someone because you think you’re right; argument refers to logical thinking with clear points, building toward a specific outcome.StandardsCC.1.2.9-10.H: Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing the validity of reasoning and relevance of evidence.CC.1.4.9-10.C: Develop and analyze the topic with relevant, well-chosen, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic; include graphics and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.CC.1.4.9-10.G: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Emily Wilkins
Date Added:
01/07/2020
Argument & Critical Thinking
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In this learning area, you will learn how to develop an argumentative essay and stronger critical thinking skills. This learning area will help you develop your arguments, understand your audience, evaluate source material, approach arguments rhetorically, and avoid logical fallacies. Here, you’ll also learn about evaluating other arguments and creating digital writing projects related to your argument.

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Excelsior College
Provider Set:
Excelsior College Online Writing Lab
Date Added:
11/06/2018
Argument, Persuasion, or Propaganda? Analyzing World War II Posters
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Students analyze World War II posters, as a group and then independently, to explore how argument, persuasion and propaganda differ.

Subject:
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
ReadWriteThink
Provider Set:
ReadWriteThink
Date Added:
09/25/2013
The Art of Language
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

The words we choose to communicate with can be quite tricky. In fact, great writers are considered artists because of their language skills. In this seminar, you will learn how to enhance an argument by choosing your words carefully and “playing” with the language. Rhetorical devices (a fancy term for “persuasive words”) will be a significant aspect of your artful language.StandardsCC.1.2.9-10.H: Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing the validity of reasoning and relevance of evidence.CC.1.4.9-10.C: Develop and analyze the topic with relevant, well-chosen, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic; include graphics and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.CC.1.4.9-10.G: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/14/2017
Buckets of Fun with Argument-Driven Inquiry in Your School Library!
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating

A new instructional model, called Argument-Driven Inquiry (ADI), is introduced to elementary teachers in this article. The author shows how school librarians and classroom teachers can collaborate to help students construct and communicate evidence, or arguments. Evidence buckets, a collaborative activity, and related online resources are presented. The article appears in the free online magazine Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle, which is structured around the seven essential principles of climate literacy.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Education
Reading Informational Text
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
Ohio State University
Ohio State University College of Education and Human Ecology
Provider Set:
Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle
Author:
Marcia Mardis
National Science Foundation
Date Added:
05/30/2012
A Concise Introduction to Logic
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

A Concise Introduction to Logic is an introduction to formal logic suitable for undergraduates taking a general education course in logic or critical thinking, and is accessible and useful to any interested in gaining a basic understanding of logic. This text takes the unique approach of teaching logic through intellectual history; the author uses examples from important and celebrated arguments in philosophy to illustrate logical principles. The text also includes a basic introduction to findings of advanced logic. As indicators of where the student could go next with logic, the book closes with an overview of advanced topics, such as the axiomatic method, set theory, Peano arithmetic, and modal logic. Throughout, the text uses brief, concise chapters that readers will find easy to read and to review.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
State University of New York
Provider Set:
OpenSUNY Textbooks
Author:
Craig DeLancey
Date Added:
03/27/2017
Convince Your Teacher or Principal
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

This lesson is designed to meet the following learning objectives:
1. Formulate an argument
2. Learn how to anticipate and respond to objections

Subject:
Literature
Philosophy
Elementary Education
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Reading
Simulation
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
PLATO - Philosophy Learning and Teaching Organization
Date Added:
10/27/2019
Critical Thinking: Analysis and Evaluation of Argument
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

It is our hope that the successful student who completes a class using all or some of this text will have improved skills with application inside the discipline of philosophy, but also with application to work in other disciplines within academia. Our ultimate goal, however, is to help people develop techniques which support curiosity, open-mindedness, and an ability to collaborate successfully with others, across differences of experiences and background. Our dream is to help people “put their heads together.”

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Portland Community College
Author:
Hannah Love
Martha Bailey
Martin Wittenberg
Shirlee Geiger
Date Added:
06/23/2017
English Composition 1
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Composition I focuses on principles of writing, critical reading and essay composition using rhetorical styles common in college-level writing (narrative, example/illustration, compare/contrast, cause-and-effect, argument).

Subject:
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Full Course
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Provider Set:
Candela Courseware
Date Added:
01/01/2014
English Composition I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This course promotes clear and effective communication by sharpening critical thinking and writing skills. The first unit is designed to change the way in which students think about writing--as a conversation rather than a solitary act. The second unit focuses on academic writing and explores the PWR-Writing or Power-Writing Method (PWR Pre-Write, Write, Revise). The remaining units will focus on the minutiae of good writing practices, from style to citation methodology. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Demonstrate mastery of principles of grammar, usage, mechanics, and sentence structure. Identify the thesis in another individual's essay. Develop a thesis statement, structure it in an introductory paragraph, and support it with the body of the essay. Organize ideas logically within an essay, deploying adequate transitional devices to ensure coherence, flow, and focus. Differentiate between rhetorical strategies and write with an awareness of rhetorical technique and audience. Differentiate between tones and write with an awareness of how tone affects the audience's experience. Demonstrate critical and analytical thinking for reading and writing purposes. Quote, paraphrase, and document the work of others. Write sentences that vary in length and structure. (English 001)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Composition and Rhetoric
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Reading Foundation Skills
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/10/2011
English Language Arts, Grade 11
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

The 11th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 11th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Students move from learning the class rituals and routines and genre features of argument writing in Unit 11.1 to learning about narrative and informational genres in Unit 11.2: The American Short Story. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers
Rating

In this unit, students will take a look at the historical vision of the American Dream as put together by our Founding Fathers. They will be asked: How, if at all, has this dream changed? Is this dream your dream? First students will participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing for his or her vision of the American Dream, and then they will write an argument laying out and defending their personal view of what the American Dream should be.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate closely one of the documents that they feel expresses the American Dream.
Students participate in an American Dream Convention, acting as a particular historical figure arguing his or her vision of the American Dream.
Students write a paper, taking into consideration the different points of view in the documents read, answering the question “What is the American Dream now?”
Students write their own argument describing and defending their vision of what the American Dream should be.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What has been the historical vision of the American Dream?
What should the American Dream be? (What should we as individuals and as a nation aspire to?)
How would women, former slaves, and other disenfranchised groups living during the time these documents were written respond to them?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Making the Case for..., Visions of the American Dream
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

In this lesson, students will try to convince their classmates that their character's vision of the American Dream is the best one, and they will evaluate the arguments that their classmates present.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Meeting the Players, Effective Arguments
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

In this lesson, students will closely analyze the structure of their document, identifying claims, reasons, evidence, and implied or explicit counterarguments. They'll also evaluate the argument made.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Meeting the Players, Tailoring Your Argument
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

In this lesson, students will examine ways that their writer tailored his or her argument to suit his or her audience, and they'll begin to plan for how they will appeal to a modern teenage audience in their presentation.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, American Dreamers, Setting the Stage, How is an argument structured?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

What is the best way to convince people that you are right? In this lesson, students will look at the structure of the Declaration of Independence, examining how the argument is constructed.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Much Ado About Nothing
Rating

This unit uses William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing as a vehicle to help students consider how a person is powerless in the face of rumor and how reputations can alter lives, both for good and for ill. They will consider comedy and what makes us laugh. They will see how the standards of beauty and societal views toward women have changed since the Elizabethan Age and reflect on reasons for those changes. As students consider the play, they will write on the passages that inspire and plague them and on topics relating to one of the themes in the play. Finally, they will bring Shakespeare’s words to life in individual performances and in group scene presentations.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing .
Students read two Shakespearean sonnets and excerpts from an Elizabethan morality handbook dealing with types of women, and they respond to them from several different perspectives.
For each work of literature, students do some writing. They learn to write a sonnet; create a Prompt Book; complete a Dialectical Journal; and write an analytical essay about a topic relating to a theme in the play.
Students see Shakespeare’s play as it was intended to be seen: in a performance. They memorize 15 or more lines from the play and perform them for the class. Students take part in a short scene as either a director or an actor.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What are society’s expectations with regard to gender roles?
Does humor transcend time? Do we share the same sense of humor as our ancestors?
How do we judge people?
How important is reputation?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT (Cold Read)

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

CLASSROOM FILMS

The Branagh version of Much Ado About Nothing is available on DVD through Netflix and for streaming through Amazon. Other versions are also available on both sites.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Name That Theme
Rating

In this short unit, students will spend three lessons exploring the importance of themes and main ideas in fiction and informational texts.  Now would be a good time to have them take an assessment of their reading and writing skills. They'll explore theme through O. Henry's classic short story  "The Gift of the Magi" and consider how this piece compares to the main idea in the article "The Proven Power of Giving, Not Getting."

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Name That Theme, Name That Theme, Culminating Assessment (Writing Portion)
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

 In this lesson, you will take the writing portion of the culminating assessment. You will continue to use the skills you have learned in the first three lessons of this unit.Today, students will take the writing portion of the culminating assessment.They will reflect on all the material they have read in this unit, and they will use their understanding of all the material presented to them to write an essay. You will evaluate their work in both reading comprehension and writing.Lesson PreparationRead the lesson and student content.Anticipate student difficulties and identify the differentiation options you will choose for working with your students.If you have students on an IEP or other accommodations, check to see whether they receive extended time or need an alternative test setting. Work with the professional supporting SWDs to make sure student needs are met.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Project: Growing Up Digital
Rating

In this unit, students will produce two major pieces of work.  The first piece is an argument essay that grapples with one of the core questions of the unit: who are we, and who have we become because of the ways we connect? Students will read, annotate, and discuss several texts together as they consider the issues surrounding this question, and they will also research and annotate independently as they search for more evidence and perspectives to help deepen their ideas.  They will also create a museum exhibit as part of a team.  The exhibit project will help students identify what's worth preserving about their unique place in history.

PROJECT UNITS

This project unit continues to meet the English Language Arts standards as it also utilizes the learning principles established by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills. It is designed to support deep content knowledge and perseverance through long-term project planning and implementation. In addition, it will help students to recognize, develop, and apply the planning, teamwork, communication, and presentation skills they will use while presenting a final product to their class and/or the greater community. This real-world project-based activity will give students an opportunity to apply the skills they have been learning all year and will guide them to develop the motivation, knowledge, and skills they need in order to be college and career ready.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students write an argument paper where they develop a claim about current culture as it has been influenced by digital connectivity.
Students participate in a group project to create a museum exhibit that captures a unique place, time, and relationship to technology. Students acknowledge the differing perspectives of each group member and use those perspectives to synthesize one cohesive visual argument together.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

What does it mean to be digitally connected?
What are the implications of living in a world where everyone is digitally connected?
How does the availability of instant connectivity shape our relationships?
What does our Internet use reveal about people's needs as humans?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Project: Growing Up Digital, Communicating a Digital Experience, Exploring A Digital Native Exhibit
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Today students will explore one another's Digital Native museum exhibits. They'll have a chance to think about each exhibit and make notes about how it accomplishes the scoring criteria.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution
Rating

People often say that mankind should learn from history. Charles Dickens, whose books are considered classics, set his novel A Tale of Two Cities in the past. He wanted his readers to learn from the bloody French Revolution and from the widespread brutality in London. Both cities (Paris and London) offer the reader a glimpse into dark and dangerous times. As students read about Dickens's Victorian setting and learn his view of the French Revolution, they will think about what makes a just world. Students will have a chance to think about their own experiences, and, using techniques they have learned from Charles Dickens, they will do some writing that sends a message about your own world.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

To complete the unit accomplishments, students will:

Read the Charles Dickens novel A Tale of Two Cities.
Read several short pieces, including a biography of Dickens and excerpts from other literature, to help them understand Dickens’s world and the world of the novel.
Explore new vocabulary to build their ability to write and speak using academic language.
Practice close reading and participate in several role plays and dramatic readings to help them experience the dramatic writing style of Charles Dickens.
Write a vignette and a short narrative piece, and practice using descriptive detail and precise language.
Write a reflection about the meaning of Dickens’s novel.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How does good storytelling affect the reader, and how can a good story promote change in the world?
What was the Victorian view of gender roles?
How can power be abused?
What is loyalty ? What are the limits of loyalty?

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 11, Revolution, Is This Justice?, Theme Analysis
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

In this lesson, students will think about the theme of sacrifice in the novel, and reflect on the novel’s final impact on themselves as readers. They will also pay careful attention to the famous lines that conclude the novel.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

The 12th grade learning experience consists of 7 mostly month-long units aligned to the Common Core State Standards, with available course material for teachers and students easily accessible online. Over the course of the year there is a steady progression in text complexity levels, sophistication of writing tasks, speaking and listening activities, and increased opportunities for independent and collaborative work. Rubrics and student models accompany many writing assignments.Throughout the 12th grade year, in addition to the Common Read texts that the whole class reads together, students each select an Independent Reading book and engage with peers in group Book Talks. Language study is embedded in every 12th grade unit as students use annotation to closely review aspects of each text. Teacher resources provide additional materials to support each unit.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
10/06/2016
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Project: Self-Portrait
Rating

This project unit—a multimedia self-portrait published in digital form—is the capstone of your students' high school careers. It is a chance for them to pause and reflect on where they've been, where they're going, and who they are as a person. Students will reflect on what they want others to know about them: what they want their message to be and what types of media they might use to convey that message. Students will have the opportunity to express themselves in many different formats—through writing, of course, but also through other media of their choosing. Students will be able to convey your message through visual art, photography, a graphic novel, audio, poetry, or video—practically any type of media they want!

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students will complete a multimedia self-portrait, capturing important aspects of the essence of themselves.
Students will contribute one chapter from their multimedia self-portrait to a class anthology.
Students will present one chapter from their multimedia self-portrait to the class.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How is late adolescence a moment of internal and external change?
What are the most important qualities of your character—past, present, and future?
How can you portray these key aspects of yourself using multimedia?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Project: Self-Portrait, Artifacts of Change, Project Revision
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

Students will spend time finishing the revision of their written chapter and reviewing possible extensions to include in their work—such as creating an image or writing a poem. They’ll share the ways in which their project work has gone well and any concerns they still have.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law
Rating

The laws that govern and the social norms that regulate society are not always fair, legal, moral, or ethical. What is a person to do about all this injustice? What are the hazards of righting injustices or changing social norms? And what are the dangers of doing nothing?

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Students read and annotate Antigone, “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” and Pygmalion.
Students write a literary analysis showing the effect of social class or the law on a character’s life.

GUIDING QUESTIONS

These questions are a guide to stimulate thinking, discussion, and writing on the themes and ideas in the unit. For complete and thoughtful answers and for meaningful discussions, students must use evidence based on careful reading of the texts.

How do social class and legal institutions shape literary characters’ lives (and presumably our lives)?
How does social class affect a person in dealing with the law (protect a person, hurt a person)?
How is social class determined in America and in other places in the world?

BENCHMARK ASSESSMENT: Cold Read

During this unit, on a day of your choosing, we recommend you administer a Cold Read to assess students’ reading comprehension. For this assessment, students read a text they have never seen before and then respond to multiple-choice and constructed-response questions. The assessment is not included in this course materials.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Reading Informational Text
Reading Literature
Speaking and Listening
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Provider:
Pearson
English Language Arts, Grade 12, Social Class and the Law, Character Analysis Essay, Final Peer Review
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

In this lesson, students will review each other’s Character Analysis Essays. Then they’ll revise their essays again based on their partner’s feedback.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Pearson
Date Added:
09/21/2015
Fact, Opinion, or Just Fiction?
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC
Rating

We learn about facts and opinions in elementary school. As we get older, however, sometimes the lines get blurred. For example, “I don’t like mayonnaise” is a fact. My opinion is that mayonnaise is gross. When developing an effective argument, it is important to know the difference between a fact, an opinion, and what’s just fiction (made up/fake). In this seminar, you will refresh your working knowledge of facts and opinions and, more importantly, understand their impact in written and spoken arguments.StandardsCC.1.2.9-10.H: Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing the validity of reasoning and relevance of evidence.CC.1.4.9-10.C: Develop and analyze the topic with relevant, well-chosen, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic; include graphics and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.CC.1.4.9-10.G: Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics.

Subject:
English Language Arts
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Bonnie Waltz
Tracy Rains
Deanna Mayers
Date Added:
10/14/2017
Fundamental Methods of Logic
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Fundamental Methods of Logic is suitable for a one-semester introduction to logic/critical reasoning course. It covers a variety of topics at an introductory level. Chapter One introduces basic notions, such as arguments and explanations, validity and soundness, deductive and inductive reasoning; it also covers basic analytical techniques, such as distinguishing premises from conclusions and diagramming arguments. Chapter Two discusses informal logical fallacies. Chapters Three and Four concern deductive logic, introducing the basics of Aristotelian and Sentential Logic, respectively. Chapter Five deals with analogical and causal reasoning, including a discussion of Mill's Methods. Chapter Six covers basic probability calculations, Bayesian inference, fundamental statistical concepts and techniques, and common statistical fallacies.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Author:
Matthew Knachel
Date Added:
09/08/2017
Grade 8 - Differentiate between Fact and Assumption
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
Rating

Compelling Question: How can words lead to conflict?

This inquiry provides students with the opportunity to analyze, through the evaluation of words, how conflicts between the U.S. government and Native American tribes arose. Students will be asked to investigate federal reports, speeches, and news reports to discern U.S. leaders’ perspectives and compare these biases to the words of Native American leaders Chief Red Eagle and Chief Tecumseh. This query is meant to challenge students to analyze the meaning of words and evaluate how these words said can cause conflict through three events: Andrew Jackson’s involvement in the War of 1812 and his presidency, the Sioux Ghost Dance, and Georgia v. Worcester. Students must also be able to think critically from Native American Chiefs’ perspectives to be able to accurately comprehend the power behind the U.S.’s conflicting words. The final summative assessment asks students to write an argument using evidence and a counterargument addressing how words lead to conflict.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Unit of Study
Provider:
New York State Education Department
Provider Set:
C3 Teachers
Author:
Cynthia Yurosko
Evergreen Public Schools
Date Added:
08/17/2018