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APA Research and Formatting
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A strong foundation in science (including this social science) has always been an essential element of post-secondary education. The current White House administration demonstrates that people are much more impressionable when they don't have the critical tools to question so-called experts. Critical analysis of research has always been integral to the sciences, but with so much misinformation coming out of those in power, it is more important than ever to have a strong background in science and research. 

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Ron Mossler
Date Added:
01/13/2019
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Analyzing Findings
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Explain what a correlation coefficient tells us about the relationship between variablesRecognize that correlation does not indicate a cause-and-effect relationship between variablesDiscuss our tendency to look for relationships between variables that do not really existExplain random sampling and assignment of participants into experimental and control groupsDiscuss how experimenter or participant bias could affect the results of an experimentIdentify independent and dependent variables

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Melinda Boland
Date Added:
01/12/2018
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Archival, Case Studies and Natural Observations
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Describe the different research methods used by psychologistsDiscuss the strengths and weaknesses of case studies, naturalistic observation, surveys, and archival research

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Melissa Tapia
Date Added:
03/18/2019
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Archival Research, Case Studies, and Developmental Research Designs
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After reading this module, you will be able to:Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of archivall research and case studiesDescribe longitudinal, cross-sectional, and sequential research designs

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Lisa Bauer
Date Added:
03/15/2019
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Archival Research, Case Studies, and Developmental Research Designs
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After reading this module, you will be able to:Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of archivall research and case studiesDescribe longitudinal, cross-sectional, and sequential research designs

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Lisa Bauer
Date Added:
03/18/2019
The Biochemistry of Love
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Love is deeply biological. It pervades every aspect of our lives and has inspired countless works of art. Love also has a profound effect on our mental and physical state. A “broken heart” or a failed relationship can have disastrous effects; bereavement disrupts human physiology and may even precipitate death. Without loving relationships, humans fail to flourish, even if all of their other basic needs are met. As such, love is clearly not “just” an emotion; it is a biological process that is both dynamic and bidirectional in several dimensions. Social interactions between individuals, for example, trigger cognitive and physiological processes that influence emotional and mental states. In turn, these changes influence future social interactions. Similarly, the maintenance of loving relationships requires constant feedback through sensory and cognitive systems; the body seeks love and responds constantly to interactions with loved ones or to the absence of such interactions. The evolutionary principles and ancient hormonal and neural systems that support the beneficial and healing effects of loving relationships are described here.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Steve Porges
Sue Carter
Date Added:
12/22/2017
Biopsychology: Interdisciplinary Explorations
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This is an Open Educational Resource created by University College Groningen (The Netherlands) students taking the course Biopsychology in Spring 2021.

In small teams, students were tasked with creating, composing, and curating an online portfolio dedicated to an interdisciplinary exploration of a topic of their choice. Their portfolio needed to be grounded in neuroscience, incorporate peer-reviewed research, and propose active learning exercises for future students and viewers.

Included topics:
- A trip through the world of psychedelics
- Alzheimer's disease
- Animal minds
- Biopsychological aspects of sexuality
- Consciousness
- Go with the flow: an interdisciplinary exploration of the flow state
- Happiness and well-being
- Hypnosis
- Intergenerational trauma
- Lucid dreaming
- Machine learning for mind reading
- Social and cultural neuroscience of prejudice
- Our sense of self
- Out of body experiences
- You and aesthetics

Please enjoy exploring their work!

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Biology
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Interactive
Module
Author:
Chris May
Date Added:
04/06/2022
The Brain
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The human brain is responsible for all behaviors, thoughts, and experiences described in this textbook. This module provides an introductory overview of the brain, including some basic neuroanatomy, and brief descriptions of the neuroscience methods used to study it.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Diane Beck
Evalina Tapia
Date Added:
12/22/2017
Changing Your Behaviour
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Making a lasting change in our behavior is not an easy process. It usually involves significant effort, time, and a roller coaster of emotions. Think about how many times have you attempted to make a change (e.g. lose weight, eat healthier, exercise more) and either you never got started or you started but found yourself slipping back into old habits.In this module, learners will learn about factors that affect behavioural change. This module is part of a larger course on how behaviour change can positively impact the workplace.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Michelle Beehari
Date Added:
11/15/2019
Conditioning and Learning
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Basic principles of learning are always operating and always influencing human behavior. This module discusses the two most fundamental forms of learning -- classical (Pavlovian) and instrumental (operant) conditioning. Through them, we respectively learn to associate 1) stimuli in the environment, or 2) our own behaviors, with significant events, such as rewards and punishments. The two types of learning have been intensively studied because they have powerful effects on behavior, and because they provide methods that allow scientists to analyze learning processes rigorously. This module describes some of the most important things you need to know about classical and instrumental conditioning, and it illustrates some of the many ways they help us understand normal and disordered behavior in humans. The module concludes by introducing the concept of observational learning, which is a form of learning that is largely distinct from classical and operant conditioning.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Mark E. Bouton
Date Added:
12/22/2017
Drive States
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Our thoughts and behaviors are strongly influenced by affective experiences known as drive states. These drive states motivate us to fulfill goals that are beneficial to our survival and reproduction. This module provides an overview of key drive states, including information about their neurobiology and their psychological effects.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
George Loewenstein
Sudeep Bhatia
Date Added:
04/10/2018
Dynamics of Interpersonal Relations I
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 Dynamics of Interpersonal Relations I, is an exploration of the small-group process through participation, interpretation and study. Major focus is on the class itself as an interacting group providing for personal, interpersonal, and intellectual challenge.The modules are designed for undergraduate students to become familiar with group dynamics. This resource has a syllabus, OpenStax text chapters, TedTalks and group activities. 

Subject:
Psychology
Social Work
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Middlesex Community College
Author:
Jennifer A Burns, MA
Date Added:
08/15/2019
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Ethics
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By the end of this section, you will be able to:Discuss the guiding principles of ethical researchDiscuss how research involving human subjects is regulatedSummarize the processes of informed consent and debriefingExplain how research involving animal subjects is regulated

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Shywanda Moore
Date Added:
05/28/2019
Exploring Adolescent and Adult Development
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This is a collection of blogs written by students in a Psychology course focusing on Adolescent and Adult Development at Boise State University. Topics covered include but aren't limited to: Parenting, Media, Love & Relationships, and Puberty.      Authors: Heather Whittaker, Jesse Peters, Parker Rising Evans, Rael Jensen, & Shyann Gambill

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Module
Reading
Unit of Study
Author:
Anneke Steneker
Date Added:
12/03/2019
Failures of Awareness: The Case of Inattentional Blindness
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We think important objects and events in our world will automatically grab our attention, but they often don’t, particularly when our attention is focused on something else. The failure to notice unexpected objects or events when attention is focused elsewhere is now known as inattentional blindness. The study of such failures of awareness has a long history, but their practical importance has received increasing attention over the past decade. This module describes the history and status of research on inattentional blindness, discusses the reasons why we find these results to be counterintuitive, and the implications of failures of awareness for how we see and act in our world.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Daniel Simons
Date Added:
04/10/2018
Functions of Emotions
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Emotions play a crucial role in our lives because they have important functions. This module describes those functions, dividing the discussion into three areas: the intrapersonal, the interpersonal, and the social and cultural functions of emotions. The section on the intrapersonal functions of emotion describes the roles that emotions play within each of us individually; the section on the interpersonal functions of emotion describes the meanings of emotions to our relationships with others; and the section on the social and cultural functions of emotion describes the roles and meanings that emotions have to the maintenance and effective functioning of our societies and cultures at large. All in all we will see that emotions are a crucially important aspect of our psychological composition, having meaning and function to each of us individually, to our relationships with others in groups, and to our societies as a whole.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
David Matsumoto
Hyisung Hwang
Date Added:
04/10/2018
Gender
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This module discusses gender and its related concepts, including sex, gender roles, gender identity, sexual orientation, and sexism. In addition, this module includes a discussion of differences that exist between males and females and how these real gender differences compare to the stereotypes society holds about gender differences. In fact, there are significantly fewer real gender differences than one would expect relative to the large number of stereotypes about gender differences. This module then discusses theories of how gender roles develop and how they contribute to strong expectations for gender differences. Finally, the module concludes with a discussion of some of the consequences of relying on and expecting gender differences, such as gender discrimination, sexual harassment, and ambivalent sexism.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Christia Spears Brown
Jennifer A. Jewell
Date Added:
04/02/2018
General Psychology Canvas Course
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PSY 201 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
Credits - 4 Lecture - 4
The first of two survey courses of the basic concepts and principles of psychology. Specific topics include: the history of psychology and research methods of psychology; the biological basis of behavior, sensory and perceptual processes; states of consciousness including sleep and dreams; learning, memory, and intelligence. Emphasis is both theoretical and applied.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is the first of two courses that are designed to provide an introduction to the subject of psychology. In taking these classes, you will learn about the history of psychology, basic principles of psychology, and the many areas of study that psychology is related to. Biological, cognitive, behavioral, and affective areas of study will be discussed. This information provides a basis of knowledge for further study in psychology and may also be applied to your own life.

During this quarter we will study topics such as the history of psychology, the brain and its relation to psychological functioning, how science applies to psychology, learning, memory, thought and intelligence, sensation and perception, and sleep and dreaming. As you are introduced to each new concept, a greater understanding of how psychology affects our everyday lives will emerge.

COURSE OUTCOMES

Outcome 1: Demonstrate core psychological knowledge

Objective 1.a: Define and use psychological terms
Objective 1.b: Describe psychological concepts and relate to everyday life
Objective 1.c: Apply psychological theories to issues in everyday life

Outcome 2: Differentiate between empirical and other methods of inquiry

Objective 2.a: Discuss ways to scientifically respond to a psychological question
Objective 2.b: Identify various research designs and their applications to a research question
Objective 2.c: Interpret and evaluate qualitative and/or quantitative data

Outcome 3: Apply knowledge and skills to contemporary psychological issues

Objective 3.a: Identify and evaluate information resources
Objective 3.b: Communicate knowledge of issues through writing and discussion

Outcome 4: Recognize the diversity of human experience and thought individually and collectively

Objective 4.a: Describe how nature and nurture influence the individual

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Syllabus
Author:
Sara Reyburn
Date Added:
09/28/2021
George Floyd Memorial Racial Bias Teach-In
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The resource is a learning module that contains a three-part curriculum about the social psychology of racial bias and biased policing. It includes several TEDx lecture videos, textbook and primary source article readings, journals and written assignments for reflection, and resources for acting for social justice. It can generate a certificate of completion after the parts are marked as reviewed and reflection papers submitted.

It is currently available in Blackboard and Canvas LMS versions. We are working on a Google Docs version. If you would like to import it and adapt it for another LMS, and want to contribute to this project, please let me know and we'll get you added to the project.

It was inspired by my university releasing the university from work in honor of the George Floyd memorials. I created it as an extra credit opportunity, but could be integrated in the psychology curriculum when teaching about stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination.

Dana C. Leighton, PhD
Assistant Professor of Psychology, Texas A&M University—Texarkana
Director, Peace and Justice Psychology Lab
903-334-6627 • dleighton@tamut.edu
home: http://danaleighton.net • blog: http://danaleighton.edublogs.org
preferred pronouns: he, him, his

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Dana C. Leighton
Jon Grahe
Kristin Flora
Raechel Soicher
Date Added:
06/30/2020
Intelligence
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Intelligence is among the oldest and longest studied topics in all of psychology. The development of assessments to measure this concept is at the core of the development of psychological science itself. This module introduces key historical figures, major theories of intelligence, and common assessment strategies related to intelligence. This module will also discuss controversies related to the study of group differences in intelligence.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Robert Biswas-Diener
Date Added:
04/10/2018
Introduction to Abnormal Psychology
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This module provides students with an introduction to disordered behaviors and mental illness. Students will identify social stigmas and stereotypes that are harmful and negatively impact how people with mental illness are treated as well as what approaches can positively impact people's views of mental illness.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Stevy Scarbrough
Date Added:
03/08/2021
Language and Language Use
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Humans have the capacity to use complex language, far more than any other species on Earth. We cooperate with each other to use language for communication; language is often used to communicate about and even construct and maintain our social world. Language use and human sociality are inseparable parts of Homo sapiens as a biological species.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Yoshihisa Kashima
Date Added:
04/10/2018
Levels of Measurement and Making Frequency Distributions
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This activity reinforces learning about levels of measurement and frequency distributions in an intro level Social Science Statistics course. Students identify something up from their life, collect data for their variable, assess its level of measurement and make a frequency distribution. 

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Sociology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Sally Raskoff
Date Added:
01/24/2019
Maslow's Theory on Hierarchy of Needs
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This learning resource will enable the learner to understand the hierarchy of needs as described by Abraham Maslow. Before you do the task, look at the Resource Library ( to the right of this page) and go through the various resources mentioned. You can look at more resources too. 

Subject:
Higher Education
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Cynthia D'Costa
Date Added:
12/16/2016
Mass Murder in the Classroom: The Case Files of John Emil List, Family Annihilator
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John Emil List murdered his mother, wife, and three teenaged children on November 9, 1971 in their dilapidated Westfield, NJ mansion.  The victims were not discovered for nearly a month, and List escaped capture for nearly 18 years.  This repository includes primary source materials and lesson plans for instructors in criminal justice, history, and psychology.Repository Locationhttps://unioncc.instructure.com/courses/11394

Subject:
Journalism
Criminal Justice
U.S. History
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Beth Ritter-Guth
Date Added:
12/10/2016
Mental State Examination
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This module provides a structured way of observing and describing a patient's current state of mind, under the domains of appearance, attitude, behavior, mood and affect, speech, thought process, thought content, perception, cognition, insight and judgment. There are some minor variations in the subdivision of the Mental State Examination (MSE) and the sequence and names of MSE domains.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
OER Africa
Author:
Adjapong Kojo
Cary Engleberg
Celice McDermott
Nana Osem Osei
Oppong Victor Barnor
Tutu Akua Nketiah
Twum Nimako
Veronica Boatemaa Owusu-Afriyie
Date Added:
11/03/2010
The Nature-Nurture Question
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People have a deep intuition about what has been called the “nature–nurture question.” Some aspects of our behavior feel as though they originate in our genetic makeup, while others feel like the result of our upbringing or our own hard work. The scientific field of behavior genetics attempts to study these differences empirically, either by examining similarities among family members with different degrees of genetic relatedness, or, more recently, by studying differences in the DNA of people with different behavioral traits. The scientific methods that have been developed are ingenious, but often inconclusive. Many of the difficulties encountered in the empirical science of behavior genetics turn out to be conceptual, and our intuitions about nature and nurture get more complicated the harder we think about them. In the end, it is an oversimplification to ask how “genetic” some particular behavior is. Genes and environments always combine to produce behavior, and the real science is in the discovery of how they combine for a given behavior.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Provider:
Diener Education Fund
Provider Set:
Noba
Author:
Eric Turkheimer
Date Added:
04/02/2018
OFAR Module
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This chapter we will be acknowledging and bringing awareness to the historical discrimination that has barred education and research access to those in the Psychological field due to color, gender and other racial biases. Only by understanding this prejudice and racial discrimination can we discover the root causes of inequity and recognize those in the field that had a direct and positive contribution to the development of the field of Psychology.

Subject:
U.S. History
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Open for Antiracism Program (OFAR)
Roxanne Morales
Date Added:
07/20/2022
PSY101 - Topic 10 - Social Psychology
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Topic 10: Social PsychologyTextbook readings: pp. 409-410; pp. 417-418; pp. 428-429; pp. 441-443.Watch: [Descriptions from the website]Milgram Obedience Study - Why should you question authority? The answer lies within this ground breaking social psychology experiment by Stanley Milgram regarding human behavior and authority.The Stanford Prison Experiment - The Stanford Prison Experiment, a dramatic simulation study of the psychology of imprisonment and one of the best known psychology experiments ever undertaken.Dr. Zimbardo takes us through the Stanford Prison Experiment, in which healthy college students are transformed into unstable prisoners and brutal prison guards within days by the power of the situation in which they found themselves.Learning objectives:1.      Define social psychology.2.      Describe Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Experiment and its results. Note how social roles, norms and scripts may have affected human behavior in this study.3.      Describe Milgram’s Obedience to Authority Experiment and its results.4.      Describe how the “bystander effect” and “diffusion of responsibility” may have influenced the Kitty Genovese event.5.      Describe how prosocial behavior, altruism and empathy are related to one another.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Annemarie Roscello
Date Added:
06/08/2017
PSY101 - Topic 11 - Stress
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Topic 10: StressTextbook readings: pp. 493-494; pp. 504-510; pp. 523-528.Watch: The Brain - Series Homepage  Produced by Colorado State University. 1997, all descriptions are from the series website.The Brain: Emotions, Stress, and Health (Module 21) Commentary from scientists, dramatic reenactments, and graphic illustrations show the consequences of prolonged stress on health. Animated diagrams show the brain releasing hormones, followed by a role-playing situation illustrating on-the-job stress that may set this process in motion. Researchers explain how low-level stress leads to the breakdown of frontal lobe functioning.Learning objectives:1.      Define stress and stressors, and also describe different types of stressors.2.      Differentiate between “problem-focused” coping and “emotion-focused” coping to regulate stress. 3.      Explain “perceived control” and “learned helplessness”, and their relation to stress.4.      Explain how “social support” and “relaxation response technique” can reduce stress.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Annemarie Roscello
Date Added:
06/08/2017
PSY101- Topic 12 - Psychological Disorders
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Topic 12: Psychological DisordersTextbook readings: pp. 545-546; pp. 549-550; pp. 555-581; pp. 590-596.Watch:  Discovering Psychology: Discovering Psychology:  Psychopathology (Program 21)Psychopathology is the twenty-first program in the DISCOVERING PSYCHOLOGY series. Through glimpses of the original theories of Philippe Pinel, this program explores the biological and psychological components of mental illness, as well as the role of genetics and cultural factors. It also takes a closer look at a few of the major mental illnesses like depression, neurosis, manic-depressive disorders, and schizophrenia.©2001 WGBH Educational Foundation All Rights ReservedWatch: The Mind - Series Homepage  Produced by Colorado State University. 1999, all descriptions are from series website.The Mind:  Mood Disorders: Mania and Depression (Module 31)Presents vivid examples of the mood fluctuations of patients who suffer from periodic affective episodes.The Mind: Mood Disorders: Hereditary Factors  (Module 32)Illustrates the findings of a 10-year study that involved 12,000 volunteers in an Amish community and represents a careful analysis of genetic factors related to manic-depressive disorders.The Mind:  Mood Disorders: Medication and Talk Therapy (Module 33)Shows the effectiveness of combining drug therapies with traditional psychotherapy.Watch:The Brain - Series Homepage  Produced by Colorado State University. 1997, all descriptions are from series website.The Brain: Schizophrenia: Symptoms (Module 26)In this module, mental health professionals observe a patient named Jerry, a classic schizophrenic. Jerry's case and medication schedule are described, and his disordered speech and behavior are shown. Prominent psychiatrists describe schizophrenia and the prognosis for those diagnosed with this disease; a locked psychiatric ward provides a graphic illustration.The Brain: Schizophrenia: Etiology (Module 27)This module covers the history of attitudes, beliefs, and theories about the etiology of schizophrenia. While the illness was long thought to be environmentally caused, this module emphasizes the scientific evidence in support of its organic origins. Dr. Arnold Scheibel of UCLA Medical Center describes cellular pathology in the hippocampus and speculates on the possible role of viruses. A genetic component is also demonstrated.The Brain: Autism (Module 29)This module opens with statistics and a description of autism and how the disorder has been viewed historically. Studies now support the theory that autism results from a lack of normal neural growth during prenatal development. Dr. Temple Grandin of Colorado State University, severely autistic as a child, is presented as someone who overcame her autism and managed to use her way of perceiving the world to her advantage.Learning objectives:1.      Define psychological disorder and psychopathology.2.      State the main features of psychological disorders according to the APA (American Psychiatric Association).3.      Describe how the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) is used to classify or categorize disorders.4.      Explain the biological and the “diathesis-stress” models of psychological disorders.  5.      Describe main features (symptoms) of these psychological disorders: Anxiety Disorders (and within this category, “phobia” and “panic disorder” and “social anxiety disorder”); Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders (and within this category, “body dysmorphic disorder”), PTSD (Posttraumatic Stress Disorder), Mood Disorders (and within this category, “major depressive disorder” and “bipolar disorder”), Schizophrenia; ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) and Autistic Spectrum Disorder.6.      Discuss major theories that seek to explain what “causes” Anxiety Disorders, Mood Disorders, Schizophrenia, ADHD and Autistic Spectrum Disorder.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Annemarie Roscello
Date Added:
06/08/2017
PSY101 - Topic 13 - Therapy and Treatment
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Topic 13: Therapy and TreatmentTextbook readings: p. 607; pp. 614-629.Watch:Discovering Psychology: Discovering Psychology: Psychotherapy (Program 22)Psychotherapy is the twenty-second program in the DISCOVERING PSYCHOLOGY series. It explores different therapeutic approaches as well as the relationships among theory, research, and practice. You'll learn how some historical, cultural, and social forces have influenced approaches to the treatment of psychological disorders.Watch: The Mind - Series Homepage  Produced by Colorado State University. 1999, all descriptions are from the series website. The Mind: Treating Depression: Electroconvulsive Therapy (Module 34)Provides a clear and dramatic presentation of the process and some of the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).The Brain - Series Homepage  Produced by Colorado State University. 1997, all descriptions are from the series website.The Brain: Schizophrenia: Pharmacological Treatment (Module 28)Dr. Arnold Scheibel reviews the various ways in which schizophrenia has been treated since the 1950s, ranging from the use of physical restraints and cool baths to the administration of antipsychotic drugs. He and other psychiatrists elaborate on the ways in which drugs alter the chemistry of the brain. Drugs that are effective seem to reduce the levels of dopamine in the brain — to provide amelioration and stabilization, not a cure.Watch:The World of Abnormal Psychology - Produced by Alvin H. Perlmutter, Inc., and Toby Levine Communications. 1992, all descriptions are from the series website.The World of Abnormal Psychology: Psychotherapies (Program 12)This program allows viewers to "sit-in" on five distinctly different kinds of psychotherapy: psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, Gestalt, couples, and group. Theory and practice are intertwined as these patients progress through therapy, sometimes trying alternative models for the same problem. Learning objectives:1.      Distinguish between psychotherapy and biomedical therapy.2.      Explain the main goal and main components of psychoanalysis (Freud’s psychotherapy which includes “free association” and “dream analysis” techniques); behavior therapy which includes “exposure” technique, “aversive conditioning”, “counter-conditioning” and “token economy” technique); cognitive therapy (originated by Beck); cognitive-behavioral therapy (which incorporates both cognitive and behavioral techniques); and biomedical therapies (which include psychotropic medications and ECT: electroconvulsive therapy).3.      Distinguish between these “modalities” (formats) of psychotherapy: play therapy, individual therapy, group therapy, and family therapy. 

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Annemarie Roscello
Date Added:
06/08/2017
PSY101 - Topic 1 - Introduction to Psychology
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Topic 1 - Introduction to Psychology: Definition, Theoretical Perspectives, & SubfieldsThis course utilizes the OpenStax Psychology textbook provided by Rice University.  The book is available for free in many formats.  Use the links below to access the textbook in a format best suited to your needs.Textbook readings: pp. 5–7; pp.10-25.Watch:  Past, Present, and Promise is the first program in the DISCOVERING PSYCHOLOGY series. It provides an introduction to and overview of psychology, from its origins in the nineteenth century to current study of the brain's biochemistry. You'll explore the development of psychology in general and some of the paths scientists take to determine relationships among the mind, the brain, and behavior.©2001 WGBH Educational Foundation All Rights ReservedLearning objectives:1.      Define psychology.2.      Describe how psychoanalytic, behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, and multicultural perspectives view human behavior and mental process.3.      Define these current “subfields” in psychology: biopsychology, evolutionary, developmental, industrial-organizational, health, clinical, and forensic.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Annemarie Roscello
Date Added:
06/07/2017
PSY101 - Topic 2 - Psychological Research
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Topic 2: Psychological ResearchTextbook readings: pp. 35-36; pp. 42-48; pp. 52-56; pp. 60-63.Watch: Understanding Research, Discovering Psychology Series - This program examines how we know what we know. You'll explore the scientific method, the distinction between fact and theory, and the different ways in which data are collected and applied, both in labs and in real-world settings.[©2001 WGBH Educational Foundation All Rights Reserved]Learning objectives:1.      Describe the purpose of research.Describe these common types of research “methods” in psychology: case study, naturalistic observation, surveys, correlational studies; and experimental studies.Identify and define important terms related to the “experimental” method, especially hypothesis, random assignment, sample, population, independent variable, dependent variable, experimental group and control group.Describe ethical principles that should be applied when conducting research.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Annemarie Roscello
Date Added:
06/07/2017
PSY101 - Topic 3 - Biopsychology
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Topic 3: BiopsychologyTextbook readings: p. 73; p. 76; pp. 80-101.Watch: The Mind - Series Homepage  Produced by Colorado State University. 1999, all descriptions are from series website.Unraveling the Mysteries of the Mind (module 1) - Explores such fundamental questions as "What is the mind?" and "What is the relationship between the mind and the brain?" Summarizes various views on the brain/mind connection. Endorphins: The Brain's Natural Morphine (module 5) - Provides diagrammatic action graphics of neural networks, synaptic junctions, and neurotransmitter sites. Also touches on topics of consciousness, drug addiction, withdrawal symptoms, and nerve functioning.The Frontal Lobes: Cognition and Awareness (module 7) - Explains the importance of the frontal lobe in human functioning, and covers brain function, diagnostic assessment, cognitive function, evolution, and comparative behavior.Watch: The Brain - Series Homepage  Produced by Colorado State University. 1997, all descriptions are from series website.Organization and Evaluation of Brain Function (program 1) - This module introduces the general external topography of the brain. To illustrate the relationship between specific behaviors and brain function, the module begins by showing a racecar driver exercising his skill, and then presents graphic illustrations of the internal activity of his brain. The module reviews several methods of studying brain activity including the CAT scan, PET scan, EEG, and MRI.The Divided Brain (program 5) - This module begins with graphic representations of the cerebral hemispheres' specialized functions. It continues with a description of the brain's asymmetry, showing diagrams of how the two halves communicate. The extreme case of a patient who has undergone split-brain surgery for treatment of epilepsy illustrates the role of hemispheric organization in sensory perception and verbal skills.Learning objectives:1.      Neurons are the basic cell of the “nervous system”. Identify the basic parts of the neuron, and explain how neurons communicate with one another.2.      Define neurotransmitters and describe how some neurotransmitters (specifically, acetylcholine, dopamine, GABA, norepinephrine and serotonin) affect behavior.3.      State the difference between the central and peripheral nervous system.4.      Explain the functions of the spinal cord, and of the right and left hemispheres of the cerebral cortex (outermost layer of the brain).5.      Label the 4 lobes of cerebral cortex and identify the function(s) of each lobe.6.      Explain why the brain’s limbic system (which includes the structures hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus) is important.7.      Describe how these methods provide images of the brain: CT scan, PET scan, MRI, and EEG.8.      Explain how hormones of the endocrine system affect the body.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Annemarie Roscello
Date Added:
06/07/2017