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2a. "I Love Lucy"
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Lucy belonged to genus Australopithecus and the species afarensis, but she also belonged to the the hominid family (hominidae) to which humans belong. Although humans are of the family hominidae, we are not of Lucy's genus or species. We are Homo sapiens. How then, can Lucy be our ancient ancestor if we belong to a different genus and species? It's because humans and Lucy share a taxonomy up to the point of genus and species; there are many shared characteristics, but there are differences and these differences place humans in our own genus and species.

Subject:
Ancient History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Reading
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
Ancient Civilizations
Date Added:
12/05/2014
The Ancient City, Spring 2005
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This course focuses on the archaeology of the Greek and Roman city. It investigates the relationship between urban architecture and the political, social, and economic role of cities in the Greek and Roman world. Analyzes a range of archaeological and literary evidence relevant to the use of space in Greek and Roman cities (e.g. Athens, Paestum, Rome, Pompeii) and a range of theoretical frameworks for the study of ancient urbanism.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Broadhead, William
Date Added:
01/01/2005
The Anthropocene, Overview
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This presentation offers an overview of the developing concept of The Anthropocene -- a term coined to describe our current geological epoch, in which human impact on the planet will leave a permanent trace.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Author:
Scott W. Schwartz
Date Added:
05/11/2017
Archeology for Interpreters, A Guide to the Knowledge of the Resource
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Help students learn about archaeological methods and how archaeological interpretations are made. It is organized around questions that include: What is archeology? What do archaeologists do? How do archaeologists determine how old things are?

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
National Register of Historic Places
Date Added:
07/08/2003
Artifacts 1: What Can We Learn From Artifacts?
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In this Science NetLinks lesson, students determine what artifacts are, how they are discovered, and what information can be learned from them. They also learn how artifacts are initially buried and then excavated. This lesson is one of a two-part series on archaeology.

Subject:
Geology
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/21/2005
Artifacts 2: Artifacts in Context
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In this Science NetLinks lesson, students hypothesize how people lived during a certain time, based on archaeological sites and artifacts. This lesson puts students in the role of archaeologist, using the mysterious city of Catalhoyuk to explore how artifacts can give us clues to how people once lived. Students will explore an archaeological mystery that demonstrates the importance of context in learning from artifacts. Factors such as the artifact's location, its proximity to other artifacts, and the number of similar artifacts found can provide strong clues about the possible purpose and origins of the artifact, as well as the physical characteristics and behaviors of people responsible for creating it. This lesson is the second of a two-part series on archaeology.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
06/14/2009
Carbon 14 Dating
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The task requires the student to use logarithms to solve an exponential equation in the realistic context of carbon dating, important in archaeology and geology, among other places. Students should be guided to recognize the use of the natural logarithm when the exponential function has the given base of e, as in this problem. Note that the purpose of this task is algebraic in nature -- closely related tasks exist which approach similar problems from numerical or graphical stances.

Subject:
Mathematics
Functions
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Illustrative Mathematics
Provider Set:
Illustrative Mathematics
Author:
Illustrative Mathematics
Date Added:
05/01/2012
Cave Bear
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Decoding an ancient cave bear. A two-ton, thirteen-foot cave bear, extinct for ten thousand years, has just experienced a rebirth of sorts. From a tooth and a bone, scientists have recovered its entire genetic code.Eddy Rubin, director of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute, says finding genuine cave bear DNA was like looking for a needle in a haystack. The haystack were all the other organisms that were living in the bones and in the tooth of this ancient creature. And the needle was the little bit of the ancient creature's genome DNA, or genes.They used state-of-the-art computer technology to separate the bear genes from the clutter. Jurassic Park fans should note that they can't clone a new cave bear, nor can they recover DNA from creatures as old as the dinosaurs. But they do hope to reconstruct the genetic code of Neanderthals, our closest non-human relatives, to better understand how our own species evolved. This resource contains detailed text description of the research as well as likes for further inquiry.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
08/16/2009
Fossils 1: Fossils and Dinosaurs
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This lesson will go beyond naming dinosaurs and give students a broad understanding of how we know about the great beasts. This lesson focuses on what we have learned and can learn from fossils. The follow-up lesson, Dinosaurs Fossils - Uncovering the Facts, explores what information can be discerned by comparing fossils to living organisms.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/21/2005
Fossils 2: Uncovering the Facts
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In Fossils and Dinosaurs, the first lesson of this two lesson series, students learned the differences between facts and ideas that are extrapolated from fossil evidence. This lesson allows students to go through an 'interview' with the remains of a Protoceratops. In preparation for the interview, students first brainstorm the questions they would like answers to, and then narrow their questions to those that can be answered by studying the Protoceratops fossils.

Subject:
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/21/2005
Genes and Geography
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Our early human ancestors began migrating across the globe tens of thousands of years ago. Some left behind archaeological evidence of their travels. But as you'll hear in this Science Update, another record of where we come from and where we've been might be found right in our DNA.

Subject:
Genetics
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
03/25/2007
The Hispano Ranchos of Northern New Mexico: Continuity and Change
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This site features the small subsistence farms, or ranchos, created by Hispanos, early Spanish settlers of New Mexico, during the 1800s in the mountain valleys of the Pecos and Mora rivers. Houses were built from the same adobe used to construct Indian pueblos and Spanish missions, with decorative details added based on architectural fashions brought to New Mexico after it became a U.S. territory in 1851. Irrigation ditches were dug and regulated by rules dating back centuries.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
U.S. History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
Teaching with Historic Places (TwHP)
Date Added:
07/11/2003
History & Culture
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offers educators Park Service resources that help teach about our nation's cultural heritage, and which look at how the NPS is protecting and preserving them. Subjects include archaeology, historic buildings and structures, mapping, military history, and national historic landmarks. The resources may be in the form of learning programs, case studies, lesson plans, teachers' handbooks, and more.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Case Study
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
12/01/2004
Hominid Diet
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Between one and two million years ago, several different groups of ape-men roamed the plains of Africa. The only clues we have as to how they lived and evolved come from fossils they left behind. This Science Update tells us what some of those fossils reveal about the unusual diet of early hominids.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
10/01/2005
Human Origins and Evolution, Spring 2006
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Examines the dynamic interrelations among physical and behavioral traits of humans, environment, and culture to provide an integrated framework for studying human biological evolution and modern diversity. Topics include issues in morphological evolution and adaptation; fossil and cultural evidence for human evolution from earliest times through the Pleistocene; evolution of tool use and social behavior; modern human variation and concepts of race. Includes study of stone artifacts and fossil specimens.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
MerrickHarry
Date Added:
01/01/2006
The Human Past: Introduction to Archaeology, Fall 2006
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Archaeology reconstructs ancient human activities and their environmental contexts. Drawing on case studies in contrasting environmental settings from the Near East and Mesoamerica, considers these activities and the forces that shaped them. In laboratory sessions students encounter various classes of archaeological data and analyze archaeological artifacts made from materials such as stone, bone, ceramics, glass, and metal. These analyses help reconstruct the past. This class introduces the multidisciplinary nature of archaeology, both in theory and practice. Lectures provide a comparative examination of the origins of agriculture and the rise of early civilizations in the ancient Near East and Mesoamerica. The laboratory sessions provide practical experience in aspects of archaeological field methods and analytical techniques including the examination of stone, ceramic, and metal artifacts and bone materials. Lab sessions have occasional problem sets which are completed outside of class.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Harry Merrick
Date Added:
01/01/2006
Inca Investigation
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This OLogy activity gives kids a chance to test their investigative skills while learning about daily life for the Incas. Inca Investigation begins with an introduction to archaeologist Craig Morris and the ancient Inca city that his team excavated in the Andes mountains. Detailed directions are given for how to play Inca Investigation, which includes tips to help them better examine evidence. Each time they correctly identify a place, they are awarded an Inca Chronicle. They have the option of reading the chronicles online or printing their collection of chronicles.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Game
Interactive
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
10/15/2014
Lascaux
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Take a virtual tour of the prehistoric caves at Lascaux, France. The discovery of Lascaux in 1940 opened a new page in the knowledge of prehistoric art and our origins. Monumental work, the cave continues to feed the imagination and move the new generations of the world. This website is intended to help understand the secrets of the artists who painted and engraved bestiary at Lascaux 19,000 years ago, and to present the current trends in scientific research on the painted caves.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
World Cultures
Archaeology
Material Type:
Simulation
Provider:
Ministry of Culture and Communication, France
Provider Set:
Art History
Date Added:
09/12/2012
Mali Empire and Djenne Figures
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Archeology offers the most tangible evidence of earlier civilizations. Although archeology has already provided invaluable information pertaining to the life styles and skills of the peoples from this region of West Africa, the archaeological record is still incomplete. The figurative sculptures featured in this resource furnish one part of the historical puzzle of this region. These handsome terracotta sculptures are from the Inland Niger Delta region near Djenne (pronounced JEH-nay; also spelled Jenne), one of several important trading cities that grew and developed during the Mali Empire.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Arts and Humanities
World History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
Smithsonian Institution
Provider Set:
National Museum of African Art
Date Added:
02/09/2004
Managing Archeological Collections
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An online technical assistance and distance learning effort covering all aspects of curation -- caring for archaeological collections such as objects, records, reports, and digital data -- wherever they may be (in the field, the archeologist's office, the lab, or a repository).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
03/16/2001
Man's Best Friend?: Using Animal Bones to Solve an Archaeological Mystery
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In this case, students learn how archaeology operates as an historical science by collecting and analyzing material evidence to make claims about the past. Assuming the role of zooarchaeologists, they evaluate a hypothetical case in which "Dr. Jasper Eraillure" shocks the world by claiming a canid skull he has found at a Neanderthal site is actually that of a domestic dog. Students analyze modern skulls from wild and domestic canids, and develop a set of criteria for determining whether the "unknown" canid skull belonged to a domestic dog. They further explore the reasons behind the divergence between wild and domestic dog populations and evaluate the potential impact of Dr. Eraillure's assertions on our understanding of the past. The case was designed for an introductory course in archaeology, but could be adpated for use in an introductory biology course.

Subject:
Life Science
Zoology
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Case Study
Provider:
National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science
Provider Set:
Case Study Collection
Author:
Elizabeth Scharf
Date Added:
01/01/2008
Materials in Human Experience, Spring 2004
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Examines the ways in which people in ancient and contemporary societies have selected, evaluated, and used materials of nature, transforming them to objects of material culture. Some examples: glass in ancient Egypt and Rome; powerful metals in the Inka empire; rubber processing in ancient Mexico. Explores ideological and aesthetic criteria often influential in materials development. Laboratory/workshop sessions provide hands-on experience with materials discussed in class. Subject complements 3.091. Enrollment may be limited.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Lechtman, Heather
Date Added:
01/01/2004
The Meanings of Timbuktu
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This volume authored by leading international scholars begin s to sketch the meaning of Timbuktu within the context of the intellectual history of West Africa in particular and of the African continent in general The book covers four broad areas Part I provides an introduction to the region outlines what archaeology can tell us of its history examines the paper and various calligraphic styles used in the manuscripts and explains how ancient institutions of scholarship functioned Part II begins to analyse what the manuscripts can tell us of African history Part III offers insight into the lives and works of just a few of the many scholars who achieved renown in the region and beyond Part IV provides a glimpse into Timbuktus libraries and private collections Part V looks at the written legacy of the eastern half of Africa which like that of the western region is often ignored. In a joint project between South Africa and Mali a library to preserve more than 200 000 Arabic and West African manuscripts dating from the 13th to the 19th centuries is currently under construction It is the first official cultural project of the New Partnership for Africas Development Nepad the socioeconomic development plan of the African Union and when the library is built the cultural role of Timbuktu be revived as it becomes the safe haven for the treasured manuscripts The manuscripts prove that Africa had a rich legacy of written history long before western colonisers set foot on the continent

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
University of Cape Town
Provider Set:
UCT OpenContent
Author:
Shamil Jeppie
Souleymane Bachir Diagne (eds)
Date Added:
10/05/2010
Mummy's Curse
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Egyptian mummies have given us great insight into an important ancient culture. They've also inspired a number of horror stories. For example, it's said that anyone who dared enter a mummy's tomb would die a horrible, premature death. In this Science Update, you'll hear about a scientific investigation that tested this legend.

Subject:
World Cultures
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
03/04/2007
OLOGY: The Science Website For Kids
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On this site, through a variety of activities, you can learn about anthropology, archaeology, astronomy, biodiversity, the brain, climate change, the Earth, Einstein, expeditions, genetics, marine biology, paleontology, water, and zoology.

Subject:
Education
Life Science
Genetics
Physics
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Interactive
Provider:
SMARTR
Provider Set:
SMARTR: Virtual Learning Experiences for Youth
Date Added:
11/06/2010
Ology: Archaeology
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This Ology website for kids focuses on Archaeology. It includes activities, things to make, quizzes, interviews with working scientists, and more to help kids learn about Archaeology.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
07/04/2013
Ology: Paleontology
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This Ology website for kids focuses on Paleontology. It includes activities, things to make, quizzes, interviews with working scientists, and more to help kids learn about Paleontology.

Subject:
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
American Museum of Natural History
Provider Set:
American Museum of Natural History
Date Added:
07/04/2013
Painted Garden, Villa of Livia
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This art history video dicussion examines "Painted Garden, Villa of Livia", fresco, 30-20 B.C.E. (Museo Nazionale Romano, Palazzo Massimo, Rome). Plant species include: umbrella pine, oak, red fir, quince, pomegranate, myrtle, oleander, date palm, strawberry, laurel, viburnum, holm oak, boxwood, cypress, ivy, acanthus, rose, poppy, chrysanthemum, chamomile, fern, violet, and iris.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
11/16/2012
The Perseus Digital Library
Rating

Perseus is an evolving digital library, engineering interactions through time, space, and language. Our primary goal is to bring a wide range of source materials to as large an audience as possible. We anticipate that greater accessibility to the sources for the study of the humanities will strengthen the quality of questions, lead to new avenues of research, and connect more people through the connection of ideas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Languages
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Composition and Rhetoric
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Tufts University
Date Added:
04/25/2013
The Perseus Digital Library
Rating

Perseus is an evolving digital library, engineering interactions through time, space, and language. Our primary goal is to bring a wide range of source materials to as large an audience as possible. We anticipate that greater accessibility to the sources for the study of the humanities will strengthen the quality of questions, lead to new avenues of research, and connect more people through the connection of ideas.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Languages
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Composition and Rhetoric
Archaeology
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Tufts University
Date Added:
05/08/2015
Primitive Ape-Man
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This is a Science Update dealing with the concept of evolution and the closeness of humans to other hominids. It examines evolutionary theory and where humans stand within the concept of evolution. A text discussion follows to make sense of the findings of the University of California at Berkeley biologist Tim White, who co-led the team of 60 scientists from 17 countries that discovered and studied Australopithecus anamensis--an ape-like species whose descendants include modern humans. The researches along with links to resources are included for further inquiry.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
05/20/2010
Research Seminar in Deep Sea Archaeology, Spring 2002
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Examines the intellectual foundations of the new discipline of deep sea archaeology, a convergence of oceanography, archaeology, and engineering. How best are robots and submarines employed for archaeological work? How do new technologies change operations plans, research designs, and archaeological questions? Covers oceanography, history and technology of underwater vehicles, search strategies, technology development, archaeological technique, sociology of scientific knowledge. Case studies of deep-sea projects include the wrecks of the Titanic and Monitor, Roman trading vessels in the Mediterranean, and deep research in the Black Sea.

Subject:
Oceanography
Archaeology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
MIT
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Mindell, David A.
Date Added:
01/01/2002
The Robinson House: A Portrait of African American Heritage
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Pieces together the story of the James Robinson family from artifacts found in archaeological excavations around the house where they lived for nearly a century. An African American born free in 1799, Robinson worked in a Virginia tavern earning nearly $500 to purchase 170 acres of land near Bull Run. There he built a log cabin, and his family turned the land into a prosperous farm, making him one of the wealthiest African Americans in the Manassas area in the mid-19th century.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Date Added:
01/29/2004
Sammlung von Lehrangeboten mit archäoinformatischen Inhalten
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No Strings Attached
Rating

Tabelle der IANUS bekannten Lehrveranstaltungen zur Vermittlung archäoinformatischer Inhalte für das Wintersemester 2016/2017, die von unterschiedlichen Hochschulen in Deutschland angeboten werden. Diese Auflistung erhebt keinen Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit.

Subject:
Ancient History
Archaeology
Material Type:
Module
Date Added:
10/10/2016
The Science of Mummies
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In this lesson, from Science NetLinks, students explore how technological advances can lead to advancements in scientific knowledge, and specifically how new technologies are advancing the study of mummies. This lesson should help students understand how technology has improved the study of ancient civilizations.

Subject:
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Date Added:
04/23/2006
South Africa: The "gogo" (grandmother)
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This two minute and seven second video from Howard Hughes Medical Institute presents the plight of AIDS orphans. When parents die of AIDS, the orphans often go to live with a "gogo," the Zulu word for grandmother. This video is available in QuickTime and Windows Media formats and is featured on the 2007 Holiday Lecture Series DVD AIDS: Evolution of an Epidemic.This and other free infectious disease video are available at http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/disease/video.html.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Anthropology
Archaeology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Date Added:
05/30/2012
Spanish Treasure Fleets of 1715 and 1733: Disasters Strike at Sea
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discusses Spain's search for gold and silver in the New World (1500s-1700s) and its treasure fleet system, which was intended to protect its treasure-laden ships from being seized by England, France, and the Netherlands. In 1715 and 1733, hurricanes devastated Spain's treasure fleets off the coast of Florida. Today, two of the sunken ships' remains are protected as Florida Underwater Archaeological Preserves.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Archaeology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Reading
Provider:
National Park Service
Provider Set:
Teaching with Historic Places (TwHP)
Date Added:
06/27/2006