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  • Ancient History
Adopt-a-Book Activity
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CC BY-NC
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This resource is useful for students who can visit rare books in special collections libraries. Teachers and students of book history, literature, and art history might find this resource useful.

Subject:
Art History
Literature
World Cultures
Ancient History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Taylor Clement
Date Added:
09/30/2019
Ancient Egypt Inquiry Unit
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CC BY
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An inquiry-based unit that teaches the use of primary source analysis through artifacts from Ancient Egypt.  Students are asked to analyze artifacts from their own family, analyze artifacts from King Tut’s tomb, and then create hypotheses about what we can learn from ancient artifacts.  Finally, students will construct an argument and create a press release. 

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Beky Erickson
Date Added:
06/30/2020
Ancient Latin American objects in the archive: selections from the George and Louise Patten collection of Salem Hyde cultural artifacts at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
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Early in the Spring 2020 semester, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga students in my Ancient to Modern Latin American Visual Culture Art History course embarked upon an intensive first-hand visual analysis and research project that involved working directly with original artifacts from Ancient Latin America housed within the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Library’s Special Collections. This unique opportunity and the publication of their findings were made possible thanks to the generous support and assistance of Special Collections Director Carolyn Runyon and her dedicated staff.

By examining the wide array of Pre-Columbian objects in the George and Louise Patten Salem Hyde Papers and Cultural Artifacts Collection, these upper division students formed small research groups dedicated to specific artifact types, such as human figurines, animal figurines, tools and lithics, vessels, anthropomorphic ceramics, replicas, and sherds. They carefully recorded their original observations of their selected objects of study in written field notes, photographs, and drawings. Later, they compared their initial observations with preliminary collection data developed independently by Archaeology students of Dr. Andrew Workinger, leading to further questions and insights surrounding these extraordinary pieces predominantly from pre-contact indigenous cultures of the Central and Intermediate regions of Latin America that today comprise Costa Rica, Ecuador, Panama and Colombia. Building upon their analysis, the Art History student research groups then re-examined their selected artifacts through analytical frameworks focused on Gender and the Body, Color, Pattern and Materiality, Spirituality and the Object, Form and Function, and Identity and Representation. In presenting their findings to their peers, students received feedback that allowed them to refine their analysis and develop the original individual and group catalog essays that comprise this exhibition publication. Their research sheds further light on the extraordinary value and diversity of the ancient artifacts of Latin America that uniquely form part of UTC’s Special Collections, as well as the innovative power of interdisciplinary research and collaboration.

Subject:
Art History
Ancient History
World History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga
Author:
Olivia Wolf
Date Added:
07/19/2021
Ancient Lives
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CC BY-NC-ND
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For classics scholars, the vast number of damaged and fragmentary texts from the waste dumps of Greco-Roman Egypt has resulted in a difficult and time-consuming endeavor, with each manuscript requiring a character-by-character transcription. Words are gradually identified based on the transcribed characters and the manuscripts' linguistic characteristics. Both the discovery of new literary texts and the identification of known ones are then based on this analysis in relation to the established canon of extant Greek literature and its lexicons. Documentary texts, letters, receipts, and private accounts, are similarly assessed and identified through key terms and names. Furthermore, an immense number of detached fragments still linger, waiting to be joined with others to form a once intact text of ancient thought, both known and unknown. The data not only continues to reevaluate and assess the literature and knowledge of ancient Greece, but also illuminates the lives and culture of the multi-ethnic society of Greco-Roman Egypt.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Interactive
Provider:
Citizen Science Alliance
Provider Set:
Zooniverse
Date Added:
02/26/2016
Ancient World History
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Seventh grade students will review the tools and mental constructs used by historians and geographers. They will develop an understanding of Ancient World History, Eras 1 – 4. Geography, civics/government, and economics content is integrated throughout the year. As a capstone, the students will conduct investigations about past and present global issues. Using significant content knowledge, research, and inquiry, they will analyze the issue and propose a plan for the future. As part of the inquiry, they compose civic, persuasive essays using reasoned arguments.

Subject:
Ancient History
Social Science
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MIOpenBook
Provider Set:
Michigan Open Book Project
Author:
Amy Stiegle
David Soderquist
Eric Wrzesinski
Lisa Voss
Steve Zigray
Thomas Hinken
Date Added:
08/15/2016
Ancient World History to 1300 C.E.
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This textbook is divided into three sections: Africa, Asia & Americas, and Europe. It explores the history of the world from pre-historic times to 1300 C.E., paying specific attention to the interconnections (or disconnections) between peoples and regions. Students are encouraged to think beyond their experiences with western civilizations to recognize the widespread impact of historical events and trends, including how they helped shape the world today. Touching upon each world region, the readings investigate the impact of environment, economics, politics, and religion on diverse societies. Key topics are sites of change and integration such as the rise of cities, religion, technology, migration and trade, the spread of disease, gender relationships, warfare and social movements.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Cleveland State University
Provider Set:
Michael Schwartz Library Pressbooks
Author:
Kelly Wrenhaven
Meshack Owino
Shelley Rose
Date Added:
11/18/2021
Animations - The Science of Knapping
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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Explore the physics and material science of making stone tools. Educator Nate Salzman walks us through the surprisingly complex science of flintknapping, or the process of turning stone into blades, arrowheads, spear points, axes, jewelry and more. Making tools from stone may be thousands of years old, but required people to think about the properties of the material they were using and the physics of striking the stone to shape it just right.NOTE: These are animations derived from the video "The Science of Knapping" which is linked here and published under its own listing on OER Commons.This resource is part of Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum’s open educational resources project to provide history, ecology, archaeology, and conservation resources related to our 560 acre public park. More of our content can be found on YouTube and SketchFab. JPPM is a part of the Maryland Historical Trust under the Maryland Department of Planning.

Subject:
Applied Science
World Cultures
History
Ancient History
Physical Science
Geology
Physics
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
06/07/2022
Arabic History and Culture
Read the Fine Print
Educational Use
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This webpage provides elementary information on aspects of Arab culture and history, including religion, politics, naming conventions, and Persian influence on Arab culture and language. The information seems to have been authored by the site's administrator, and contains no references or citations.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Languages
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Ancient History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Individual Authors
Author:
Hani Deek
Date Added:
09/17/2013
The Battle of Thermopylae
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CC BY
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This is a crossword that will help students of grade 7 to remember some essential details for the battle of Thermopylae, a very important lesson regarding ancient Greek history.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Anastasia Mavraki
Date Added:
03/10/2018
Confucianism Explained
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CC BY-NC-ND
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5.0 stars

This video explains the teachings of Confucius. Education is the path to moral excellence, which is central to building a harmonious society. Education is a lifelong process and the purpose of learning is to acquire virtues.

Subject:
Philosophy
Religious Studies
World Cultures
History
Ancient History
World History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
07/09/2020
A Digital Tutorial For Ancient Greek Based On John William White's First Greek Book
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CC BY-NC-SA
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John William White's First Greek Book was originally published in 1896. The book contains a guided curriculum built around the language and vocabulary of Xenophon’s Anabasis. This digital tutorial is an evolving edition that is designed to run on both traditional browsers, tablet devices, and phones. Each lesson includes drill and practice exercises in addition to the text itself. The site also includes tab-delimited files for all of the vocabulary and grammar that can be imported into flashcard programs.

For more information about the design of the tutorial, you can read an article that was published in Volume 107, Number 1, Fall 2013 of the journal Classical World on pages 111-117 or a presentation from the 2013 meeting of the Digital Classics Association. An article about the audiences and usage statistics for the tutorial entitled An Open Tutorial for Beginning Ancient Greek has been published in a volume of papers entitled Word, Space, Time: Digital Perspectives on the Classical World. edited by Gabriel Bodard & Matteo Romanello and published by Ubiquity Press.

You can use these pages to study Ancient Greek online. As you complete the drill and practice exercises in each chapter, you will earn drachmas to help track your progress. The exercises keep track of the questions you have missed and presents those to you more often. Information about your progress is stored in a cookie on your computer. You can clear all of this data on the settings page.

When you have successfully completed all of the exercises in a chapter, you will have ten drachmas. You will lose drachmas as time passes so you know when you need to review chapters again.

Subject:
Languages
Ancient History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Jeff Rydberg-Cox
Date Added:
11/01/2018
Early Civilizations & 3-D Nets
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource was created by Michael Fehringer, in collaboration with Lynn Bowder, as part of ESU2's Mastering the Arts project. This project is a four year initiative focused on integrating arts into the core curriculum through teacher education and experiential learning.

Subject:
Visual Arts
Ancient History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Arts ESU2
Date Added:
11/01/2021
Early Muslim Civilizations (622-1629) Unit (9th Grade World Studies)
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Mini-Unit Rationale:In this unit, the content to be covered will all fall under the subheading of early Muslim Civilizations. Previously the students have studied early river valley civilizations such as in the Fertile Crescent, the Indus River Valley, the Americas, the Huang River Valley and the Nile River Valley. The students will be able to use their previous knowledge of the basic constructs of a civilization to build upon the content in this chapter (10) that outlines the creation, spread and division of the Muslim political and religious empires of the Middle East. This mini-unit will lead students to the next mini-unit, which covered the spread of Islam into South and Southeast Asia through religious, cultural and political diffusion among other varying factors.This mini-unit will consist of five 45-minute lessons to be taught to a college-prep level freshman World Studies course in a private, co-educational Catholic high school classroom. There are sixteen students in the class, of varying academic abilities. Some students in the general education class have 504 accommodation plans and two have IEP’s, but they are grouped heterogeneously into this social studies course with all college-prep level students. The school is a 1 to 1 school, and all students have iPads with Ebook textbooks, internet capability, QR code readers and the whole slate of Google Apps downloaded onto their tablets. The students will all have multiple new applications downloaded onto their iPads prior to this mini-unit, and will learn how to use them during tutorial portions within this mini-unit.Overall Goal:This mini-unit is designed to help students develop as historical thinkers, critical thinkers, and digital citizens through the lens of analyzing the origins, division and spread of early Muslim civilizations.Overall Objectives:1. Students will be able to... identify the prophet of Islam, Muhammad, and explain how his teachings spread the Islamic beliefs throughout the Middle East and eventually, the world.2. Students will be able to... explain how Islam affected all aspects of religious and secular society for Muslims, and how this led to advancements and innovation in many parts of the world.3. Students will be able to... explain the divisions that emerged within Islam and the differences between their major beliefs.4. Students will be able to... explain the rise of the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphates and how those empires affected the Middle East and the surrounding lands.5. Students will be able to… read and understand detailed maps and virtual reality images of the important historical sites of Mecca and Medina, and explain their significance to the rise and spread of Islam.Overall Standards:NCSS Standards Strands:Time, Continuity and Change: Evaluate the impact of the institutions, values, and beliefs of people in the past on important historical decisions and developments, and compare different interpretations of the causes and consequences of these decisions and developments.Individuals, Groups and Institutions: Evaluate different interpretations of the influence of groups and institutions on people and events in historical and contemporary settings.Individuals, Groups and Institutions: Analyze examples of tensions between belief systems and governmental actions and policies.Power, Authority and Governance: Examine persistent issues involving the rights, responsibilities, roles, and status of individuals and groups in relation to the general welfare.Global Connections: Describe and explain conditions and motivations that contribute to conflict, cooperation, and interdependence among groups, societies, and nations.CSDE Common Core Social Studies Standards:GEO 6–7.2 Use maps, satellite images, photographs, and other representations to explain relationships between the locations of places and regions, and changes in their environmental characteristics.GEO 6–7.3 Explain how cultural patterns and economic decisions influence environments and the daily lives of people.GEO 6–7.4 Analyze the cultural and environmental characteristics that make places both similar to and different from one another.GEO 6–7.5 Explain the connections between the physical and human characteristics of a region and the identity of individuals and cultures living there.CIV 6–7.1 Explain specific roles played by citizens (such as voters, jurors, taxpayers, members of the armed forces, petitioners, protesters, and officeholders).CIV 6–7.3 Compare historical and contemporary means of changing societies and promoting the common good.HIST 6–8.1 Use questions about historically significant people or events to explain the impact on a region.INQ 9–12.5: Determine the kinds of sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple points of view represented in the sources, the types of sources available, and the potential uses of the sources.Connecticut Common Core Literacy Standards:CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.8: Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.CCSS.ELA Literacy and Reading RH.11-12.2: Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.Diocese of Bridgeport Standards:Historical Thinking: Students will develop historical thinking skills, including chronological thinking and recognizing change over time; contextualizing, comprehending and analyzing historical literature; researching historical sources; understanding competing narratives and interpretation; and constructing narratives and interpretation.Diocese of Bridgeport Historical Thinking Skills:Skill 1: Trace the emergence and decline of Muslim civilizations.Skill 2: Explain how geography and history are linked.Skill 3: Describe the tenets of Islam.Skill 4: Analyze the reason for the division of Islam.Skill 5: Evaluate the role of religion in the development of the Muslim empires in the Middle East.Skill 6: Describe the major characteristics of Muslim empires.Skill 7: Describe examples of cultural diffusion from the Muslim Empires.Skill 8: Describe the characteristics and advances of the Golden Age of Islam.Local, United States and World History: Students will use historical thinking skills to develop an understanding of the major historical periods, issues and trends in United States history, world history, and Connecticut and local history.Historical Themes: Students will apply their understanding of historical periods, issues and trends to examine such historical themes as ideals, beliefs and instructions; conflict and conflict resolution; human movement and interaction; and science and technology in order to understand how the world came to be the way it is.Applying History: Students will recognize the continuing importance of historical thinking and historical knowledge in their own lives and in the world in which they live.ISTE Net Standards for Students:Empowered Learner: 1C: Students use technology to seek feedback that informs and improves their practice and to demonstrate their learning in a variety of ways.1D: Students understand the fundamental concepts of technology operations, demonstrate the ability to choose, use and troubleshoot current technologies and are able to transfer their knowledge to explore emerging technologies.Digital Citizen: 2B: Students engage in positive, safe, legal and ethical behavior when using technology, including social interactions online or when using networked devices.2C: Students demonstrate an understanding of and respect for the rights and obligations of using and sharing intellectual property.Knowledge Constructor: 3A: Students plan and employ effective research strategies to locate information and other resources for their intellectual or creative pursuits.3C: Students curate information from digital resources using a variety of tools and methods to create collections of artifacts that demonstrate meaningful connections or conclusions.Innovative Designer: 4A: Students know and use a deliberate design process for generating ideas, testing theories, creating innovative artifacts or solving authentic problems.Creative Communicator: 6B: Students create original works or responsibly repurpose or remix digital resources into new creations.6C: Students communicate complex ideas clearly and effectively by creating or using a variety of digital objects such as visualizations, models or simulations.6D: Students publish or present content that customizes the message and medium for their intended audiences.Global Collaborator: 7B: Students use collaborative technologies to work with others, including peers, experts or community members, to examine issues and problems from multiple viewpoints.7C: Students contribute constructively to project teams, assuming various roles and responsibilities to work effectively toward a common goal.7D: Students explore local and global issues and use collaborative technologies to work with others to investigate solutions.Overall Unit Assessments:Formative Assessments: Teacher will monitor student progress by circulating and assessing student on-task behavior while providing immediate feedback and redirection if necessary.Teacher will check daily student progress via student-group Google Doc sheets.Students will take various Google Forms formative assessments to gauge their individual understanding of the content knowledge, as well as reflect on their collaboration and participation in lesson activities.Answer Garden formative assessment will be posed to gauge their individual understanding of the content knowledge, as well as reflect on their collaboration and participation in lesson activities.Students will participate in interactive Kahoot Quizzes to help both teacher and student understand individual real-time comprehension levels.Summative Assessments:Students will create an original telecast in small groups of three to display their knowledge and understanding of the Umayyad and Abbasid Empires and/or the Golden Age of Muslim Civilization, and this mini-unit overall.Students will take a summative assessment at the end of Chapter 11 (after multiple mini-units are completed) in the form of a pen-to-paper Unit test.Summary of Mini-Unit:Students will begin this unit by learning about the context of the time period, and the geography of the land and cities from where the early Muslim civilizations emanated. Then, they will learn about the major tenets of Islam and a religion and Muslims as a culture and the political systems of the early empires. Next, students will analyze the origins and spread of conflict that lead to the division of Islam into the two major sects of the religion: Sunni and Shi’a. Finally, students will learn about the Umayyad and Abbasid empires and analyze their contributions to society and culture in the Middle East, as well as trace the emergence and decline of those Muslim empires.Technology Rationale:The 9th grade students will be using various technologies each day of this mini-unit, ranging from iPad applications, to QR codes, to engaging Smart-board technology. The integration of technology into this mini-unit will optimize students’ learning experience by encouraging student collaboration, providing innovative ways of communicating their own ideas, and engaging students as global citizens who demonstrate an understanding of digital citizenship and proper use of technology in an academic setting. Some of the technologies used by the teacher and students are included to streamline the transition process and create a paperless classroom environment, which will provide many benefits for the class and even transcend the classroom, such as environmental and economical.

Subject:
Ancient History
World History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Author:
Rebecca Corso
Date Added:
07/21/2017
Early World Civilizations – Simple Book Publishing
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This course is designed to study the development of non-European civilizations from prehistory to the modern era (c.a. 1500). This course will focus on the origins, geographical context, major religions, culture, and interactions of world civilizations. Civilizations studied will include, but not be limited to, those of India, China, Japan, Mesoamerica, Africa, and the Middle East.

Subject:
History
Ancient History
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
John Mclean
Date Added:
01/30/2022
Egyptian Mathematics
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CC BY-NC-SA
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The Egyptians are known for being ahead of their time in comparison to some civilisations that came after them. This unit looks at how the Egyptians solved mathematical problems in everyday life and the technology they used. An understanding of this area has only been possible following the translation of the Rosetta Stone.

Subject:
Ancient History
Mathematics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
The Epic of Gilgamesh
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating
5.0 stars

This video offers a summary and analysis of the main themes in the Epic of Gilgamesh. The world’s first recorded epic poem, from Mesopotamia, explores important questions: can humans defy aging and conquer death?

Subject:
Literature
World Cultures
Ancient History
World History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Student Guide
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
08/08/2020
Euripides Scholia: Scholia on Orestes 1–500
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Scholia are the annotations found in medieval manuscripts of Greek authors. They are found in the margins and between the lines of a primary text, or occasionally gathered in a separate codex or section of a codex. The annotations represent an amalgamation of commentary and glosses made over a long period of time, from the 2nd century BCE to the Renaissance.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
UC Berkeley
Author:
Donald J. Mastronarde
Date Added:
09/10/2020
Gods and Goddesses of Ancient Greece (90 minutes)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

The study of ancient Greece is vital to the study of all other periods of history, including modern history, in understanding how past enduring influences shape our present. This lesson may be part of a unit on Ancient Greece that covers the major areas of this ancient civilization: geography, architecture, democracy, government, philosophy, Olympics, daily life, Athens, and Sparta. Students will learn about the gods and goddesses, their place of origin, their symbols, and their sanctuaries.   

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Wyoming Department of Education
Author:
Christina Karakanta
Date Added:
02/20/2018
The Great Conspiracy Against Julius Caesar
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CC BY-NC-ND
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Ted Talk: On March 15th, 44 BCE, Roman dictator Julius Caesar was assassinated by a group of about 60 of his own senators. Why did these self-titled Liberators want him dead? And why did Brutus, whose own life had been saved by Caesar, join in the plot? Kathryn Tempest investigates the personal and political assassination of Julius Caesar.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
TED
Provider Set:
TED-Ed
Author:
Kathryn Tempest
Date Added:
11/23/2016
Historic Games: 9 Men's Morris
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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What did people do to occupy themselves before there were computers, phones, or even electricity? Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum's Director of Education Deb Rantanen teaches how to play one of the most popular board games from ancient times up to the United States' Colonial Era: Nine Men's Morris. Along the way she'll also share some of the history of where the gameboard has been found. Search OER Commons for "9 Men's Morris Resources" for some additional materials like a link to an online game and list of locations where the game has been found. Use to support Maryland Social Studies Frameworks for grades 2 or 7. For Grade 2, Content Topic "Geography," have students note, with a map, where they live then the continents where the game has been found. Finally have them write the total of times the game has been found on each continent and express where they believe the game was invented. See the "9 Men's Morris Resources" resource on OER Commons for more find locations. For Grade 7, Content Topic "Geography," have students do the same but at the country level before hypothesizing how the game spread such as through generic answers like migration or more specific answers like the Silk Road. If you evaluate or use this resource, please respond to this short (4 question) survey here bit.ly/3ppwaXt

Subject:
World Cultures
History
Ancient History
U.S. History
World History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Provider:
Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum
Author:
JPPM Admin
Date Added:
12/03/2021
Houses and Households in Ancient Greece
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CC BY-NC-SA
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An introduction to the houses and households of ancient Greece using ancient literary texts, visual culture, and material evidence. Created with the students of CLAS 4V53/5V53 The Ancient Greek Household, Brock University, 2022.

Subject:
History
Ancient History
World History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
eCampusOntario
Author:
Alex Hoffer
Allison Glazebrook
Ashley Rydzik
Emily Laffin
Jessie Simpson
John-michael Bout
Julia Minato
Kaylee Janzen
Samantha Fisher
Shakeel Ahmed
Date Added:
05/04/2022
Humanities - Early Civilizations OER Textbook (PPCC)
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CC BY-NC
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This resource is the OER textbook created by the Humanities Department at Pikes Peak Community College (PPCC).It covers HUM 121 - Early Civilization, according to the learning objectives and common course numbering system at Colorado Community College System (CCCS).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ancient History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Marc Nash
Date Added:
03/03/2021
The Iliad
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CC BY-NC-SA
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There is no greater introduction to world literature than Homer's Iliad. The great epic poem tells the story of the Bronze Age war between the Achaeans (Greeks) and Trojans, the great warriors who did the fighting, the woman they were fighting for (and fighting over), and the gods who egged them on. This is a new, 21st century verse translation by Michael Heumann. It seeks to retain the spirit and language of Homer's original Greek while making it readable and enjoyable for a modern audience. Michael Heumann is a Professor of English at Imperial Valley College in California. He holds a PhD in English from the University of California, Riverside. This is his first translation.

Subject:
Literature
Ancient History
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Homer
Michael Heumann
Date Added:
05/07/2021
Interdisciplinary ELT Activities for Gifted
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
4.0 stars

This open resource is designed as an example of interdisciplinary activities on History, Geography and Arts to be used in ELT classes .

Subject:
Languages
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Language Education (ESL)
Special Education
Language, Grammar and Vocabulary
Ancient History
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Emine Sayar
Date Added:
10/19/2020
Introducing the Classical World
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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How do we learn about the world of the ancient Romans and Greeks? This unit will provide you with an insight into the Classical world by introducing you to the various sources of information used by scholars to draw together an image of this fascinating period of history.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Ancient History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
Itinerary of the Saint Mark's Horses
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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0.0 stars

The Horses of Saint Mark have a long itinerary through space and time. On this lesson, we will through the visualisation of their whole itinerary to make the students of their relation with powerful states on their whole history.

Subject:
Art History
Ancient History
Material Type:
Interactive
Simulation
Author:
Zafeirios Avgeris
Date Added:
01/13/2020
Lēʻahi Crater
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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Thousands of tourists and local residents hike Lēʻahi Crater every day. Learn about the moʻolelo of Lēʻahi Crater and how it was used hundreds of years ago.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Lesson
Author:
Mimi Wong
Date Added:
10/28/2019
Marginalized Voices
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CC BY-NC
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This assignment is designed as a mini-research project with the purpose of having students engage with marginalized actors in history. The purpose is to help students find themselves in the archives by focusing on self-representation that is important to their own socio-economic and ethnic groups. By providing historical research in the form of primary and secondary documents on figures that have been historically "left out" of the historical narrative, the students will help fill the gaps in the archive, be active in the creation of new curriculum, and gain a better understanding of marginalization and the power of historical memory in the process.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Religious Studies
Criminal Justice
History
Ancient History
U.S. History
World History
Anthropology
Sociology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Jeff Newby
Open for Antiracism Program (OFAR)
Date Added:
06/10/2022
Medieval Chivalry, the Crusades, and the Modern Far-Right
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CC BY-NC-ND
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The Middle Ages are in the news a lot these days—from the invocation of the “Crusades” after 9/11 to the “medieval” plight of women in some areas of the modern Middle East to alt-right protestors dressing as chivalric knights and Vikings and using medieval symbols during the “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. How do we teach students to understand and navigate a historical period that justifies ideas as varied as the Disney princess and terroristic violence? In this webinar, medieval studies and history of race expert Cord J. Whitaker leads participants through an exploration of far- and alt-right understandings of feudalism, caste systems, and racial homogeny in medieval Europe. We will also consider the Middle Ages’—and especially the Crusades’—roles in constructing the racial concepts of blackness and whiteness in the modern world. The webinar will include strategies for using students’ everyday experiences to teach these concepts inductively and intellectual strategies for resisting the further cooptation of the Middle Ages for racist objectives.

Subject:
Art History
Literature
Religious Studies
World Cultures
Ancient History
U.S. History
World History
Cultural Geography
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Cord Whitaker
National Humanities Center
Date Added:
10/30/2019
Michigan Open Book Project
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
4.0 stars

Materials developed under a grant from the Michigan Dept of Education. The MI Open Book Project is a multi-year initiative funded as part of the Technology Readiness Infrastructure Grant (TRIG) which will empower groups of master teachers to come together, collaborate, and develop a open education resource for use in classrooms around Michigan. Full textbooks. All books will run on iOS, OSX, Andriod, Windows, and Chrome.

Subject:
History
Ancient History
U.S. History
Economics
Material Type:
Lesson
Textbook
Date Added:
10/17/2017
Myth: How Our Stories Connect Us All
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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This resource is a lesson plan intended to introduce minoritized freshman and sophomore college students to the study of mythology and to its universal importance as the foundation of our common cultural heritage. The module may also be modified to accomodate high school level language arts courses. This resource will represent approximately three weeks of a typical 10 to 15 week World Literature survey course. 

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
World Cultures
Film and Music Production
English Language Arts
Ancient History
Ethnic Studies
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Interactive
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Module
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Unit of Study
Author:
Linda Woods
Date Added:
06/26/2021
Mythology Unbound: An Online Textbook for Classical Mythology
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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This online textbook contains short articles on each major deity, hero, monster, etc., in Greek mythology. The text is supplemented with color photographs and maps to enhance the learning experience.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Jessica Mellenthin
Susan O. Shapiro
Date Added:
02/15/2018
Plague Diaries: Firsthand Accounts of Epidemics, 430 B.C. to A.D. 1918
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-SA
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A collection of nine excerpts from historical accounts of epidemics: two from ancient sources, one from the Black Death in 14th century Europe, one from the 1665 Plague of London, one from the late 18th century Yellow Fever outbreak in Philadelphia, two from smallpox epidemics on Native American reservations in the late 19th century, and two from the influenza pandemic of 1918.

All readings include a brief introduction to the historical context, a glossary, discussion questions, and sources. Discussion questions can be edited to support learning in various disciplines.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Religious Studies
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
History
Ancient History
U.S. History
World History
Anatomy/Physiology
Anthropology
Ethnic Studies
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Reading
Textbook
Author:
David Ulrich
Ryan Johnson
Tina Ulrich
Date Added:
05/12/2020
The Repute and Reality of Being a Roman Emperor
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
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The Roman emperor had key relationships with several differing groups within the Roman empire, including the senate, the populace of Rome, the army and the provinces. This unit will focus on exploring the emperor's relationship with the provinces and will show you how this relationship was represented and mediated, manifesting the culture of the empire in the figure of the emperor.

Subject:
Ancient History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
02/16/2011