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1897 Petition Against the Annexation of Hawaii
Unrestricted Use
Public Domain
Rating

This site recounts the struggle for control of Hawaii between native Hawaiians and American business interests in the late 1800s. This 1897 petition and a lobbying effort by native Hawaiians convinced the U.S. Congress not to annex the islands. But months later the U.S.S. Maine exploded in Havana and the Spanish-American War began. The U.S. needed a mid-Pacific fueling station and naval base.

Primary source images, standards correlation, and teaching activities are included in this resource.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Date Added:
08/24/2007
9/11 Memorial: Interactive 9/11 Timelines
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This interactive timeline chronicles the events of 9/11 using images, audio and video from the 9/11 Memorial Museum's permanent collection. The timeline tells the story of the day as it unfolded in the air and on the ground. It's filled with first-person accounts from survivors, first responders and witnesses. Please note: Due to the nature of events related to the Sept. 11 attacks, the timeline contains some graphic images and sensitive content. Parents may want to first review the site before sharing it with young children.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Reading
Provider:
National September 11 Memorial & Museum
Author:
National September 11 Memorial & Museum
Date Added:
09/09/2011
ACT UP and the AIDS Crisis
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore AIDS activism during the 1980s. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Franky Abbott
Date Added:
04/11/2016
The Acceleration of the Great Migration, 1916-17
Only Sharing Permitted
CC BY-NC-ND
Rating

Students work in groups to examine excerpts from primary source documents. They identify social and economic factors affecting specific categories of people when the Great Migration accelerated in 1916 to 1917: black migrant workers from the South, southern planters, southern small-farm farmers, northern industrialists, agents, and white immigrant workers in the North. Each student group creates a "perspectives page" to post for a gallery walk where students analyze the causes of the Great Migration and the changes it brought to both the North and South. Students also discuss the specific economic factors that influenced the Great Migration: scarcity, supply, demand, surplus, shortage, and opportunity cost. Using the PACED decisionmaking model, they analyze the alternatives and criteria of potential migrants.

Subject:
U.S. History
Economics
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Provider:
Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis
Provider Set:
Economic Lowdown Lessons
Author:
Eva Johnston
Date Added:
09/11/2019
Activism in the US
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The United States has a long history of activists seeking social, political, economic, and other changes to America—along with a history of other activists trying to prevent such changes. American activism covered a wide range of causes and utilized many different forms of activism. American sociopolitical activism became especially prominent during the period of societal upheaval which began during the 1950s. The African American civil rights movement led the way, soon followed by a substantial anti-war movement opposing American involvement in the Vietnam War, and later by vigorous activism involving women’s issues, gay rights, and other causes. The United States remains a land of nearly constant change, and activists play a significant role in the ongoing evolution of American democracy. It seems likely that Americans will remain enthusiastic activists in the future. This exhibition is part of the Digital Library of Georgia.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Library of Georgia
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Date Added:
04/01/2013
Ad Access: Train Advertisements
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Rating

The Ad*Access Project presents images and database information advertisements printed in U.S. and Canadian newspapers and magazines between 1911 and 1955. This selection of ads is about trains.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Provider:
Duke University
Provider Set:
Duke University Libraries
Date Added:
03/24/2014
Advanced Energy Policy
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

Energy policy is typically evolutionary as opposed to revolutionary. We can look to historical policies to understand how we've inherited the policies governing our energy use today. But looking backward only tells us part of the story. In the face of climate change, we need to look ahead and instead envision a more revolutionary change to our energy systems and the policies that govern them. This class takes you on that journey to energy policies past, present, and future. We look at the political realities of addressing climate change at various scales of governance and work together to craft our own ideal scenarios of what a responsible energy future will be.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Environmental Studies
English Language Arts
U.S. History
Economics
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Penn State's College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (http
Penn State University
Provider Set:
// e-education.psu.edu/oer/)
Author:
Brandi Robinson
Date Added:
10/07/2019
African American Civil Rights Movement in Oklahoma
Read the Fine Print
Rating

African Americans have a long history in Oklahoma. They first came to Oklahoma during the forced removal of American Indians because some tribes held African Americans as slaves. There were also African Americans who were American Indian and free. During the Civil War, many of these men in Indian Territory joined the war on both the Union and Confederate sides. Called Buffalo Soldiers, these African American servicemen played a vital role in Oklahoma and Indian Territory as well as in other regions of the West. Both the 9th and the 10th Cavalries and the 24th Infantry served in Indian Territory during the latter nineteenth century. Stationed at Fort Gibson, the 1st Kansas Colored Volunteers Infantry Regiment (later supplemented with the 2nd Kansas) fought at Cabin Creek and at the pivotal engagement of Honey Springs in July 1863. After the Civil War ended in 1865, all of the slaves in the United States, including Indian Territory, were freed. Known as freedmen, many continued living among the Indians.

Subject:
U.S. History
Sociology
Material Type:
Unit of Study
Author:
Oklahoma Historical Society
Date Added:
06/19/2020
The African-American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This site explores the diversity and complexity of African-American culture in Ohio. These manuscripts, texts, and images focus on themes that include slavery, emancipation, abolition, the Underground Railroad, the Civil War, Reconstruction, African Americans in politics and government, and African-American religion.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
American Memory
Date Added:
06/30/2000
African American History: From Emancipation to the Present
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

The purpose of this course is to examine the African American experience in the United States from 1863 to the present. Prominent themes include the end of the Civil War and the beginning of Reconstruction; African Americans' urbanization experiences; the development of the modern civil rights movement and its aftermath; and the thought and leadership of Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., and Malcolm X. WARNING: Some of the lectures in this course contain graphic content and/or adult language that some users may find disturbing.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Jonathan Holloway
Date Added:
04/30/2012
African American History and Culture
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

African American History and Culture contains 10 modules starting with African Origins - History and Captivity and continuing through Reconstruction. Openly-licensed course materials developed for the Open Educational Resources (OER) Degree Initiative, led by Achieving the Dream https://courses.lumenlearning.com/catalog/achievingthedream.

Subject:
Computer Science
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Lumen Learning
Author:
Florida State College At Jacksonville
Date Added:
01/07/2020
African American Soldiers in World War I
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore the experiences of African American Soldiers in World War I. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Jamie Lathan
Date Added:
04/11/2016
Allston's Elijah in the Desert
Conditional Remix & Share Permitted
CC BY-NC-SA
Rating

This art history video discussion examines Washington Allston's "Elijah in the Desert", 1818, oil on canvas, 125.09 x 184.78 cm / 49 1/4 x 72 3/4 inches (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston).

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Lecture
Provider:
Khan Academy
Provider Set:
Smarthistory
Author:
Beth Harris
Steven Zucker
Date Added:
11/07/2012
America Through Media
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Historians learn about the past in many ways. Political and legal documents, economic statistics, film and video footage of events, material items such as tools and clothing, literature, songs, movies: all of these leftovers from previous eras help historians piece together the different ways that societies change over time. This interactive textbook is designed to help students understand America in the twentieth century through examination of the media produced in that era. Such explorations into the past are called cultural history, which has been defined by the Yale University Department of History as “an effort to inhabit the minds of the people of different worlds.”

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
MassBay Community College
Author:
Jill Silos-Rooney
Date Added:
05/13/2019
America during the 1918 Influenza Pandemic
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

In the spring of 1918, the United States was embroiled in World War I, fighting alongside the English, French, and Russians against the Central Powers of Germany and Austria-Hungary. In total, 70 million men were at war on multiple fronts across Europe, Russia, the Middle East, and Northern Africa. The tide was finally turning for the Allies after a crushing offensive by German forces mere weeks earlier. Then, a fierce enemy intervened—an outbreak of influenza that would decimate entire regiments and towns, kill civilians and soldiers alike by the millions, and rapidly become a global pandemic. This disease weakened forces on both sides, changing not only the course of the war but also the economies and population stability of every affected nation. In the long term, this particular outbreak would inspire research on an unprecedented scale and lead to advances in science and medicine, forever altering our understanding of epidemiology. From the spring of 1918 to early 1919, no aspect of life remained untouched by the pandemic for Americans at home and on the front. This exhibition explores the pandemic’s impact on American life.  This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Dr. Joan E. Beaudoin's course "Metadata in Theory and Practice" in the School of Library and Information Science at Wayne State University: Bethany Campbell, Michelle John, Samantha Reid-Goldberg, Anne Sexton, and John Weimer.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Wayne State University
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Anne Sexton
Bethany Campbell
John Weimer
Michelle John
Samantha Reid-Goldberg
Date Added:
04/01/2015
The American Abolitionist Movement
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This collection uses primary sources to explore the American Abolitionist Movement. Digital Public Library of America Primary Source Sets are designed to help students develop their critical thinking skills and draw diverse material from libraries, archives, and museums across the United States. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to related resources, and a teaching guide. These sets were created and reviewed by the teachers on the DPLA's Education Advisory Committee.

Subject:
U.S. History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Provider Set:
Primary Source Sets
Author:
Kerry Dunne
Date Added:
10/20/2015
American Aviatrixes: Women with Wings
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

Throughout the early twentieth century, women looked to break new ground in ways never before possible, and the sky literally became the limit. As the nation moved into the aviation age, many women saw flying as a way to break out of traditional societal roles. It gave women not just an opportunity for adventure and excitement, but a way to earn a living outside of the home that demanded respect. Aviatrix Ruth Bancroft Law described it, after defeating the cross-country distance record: "There is an indescribable feeling which one experiences in flying; it comes with no other form of sport or navigation. It takes courage and daring; one must be self-possessed, for there are moments when one's wits are tested to the full. Yet there is an exhilaration that compensates for all one's efforts." In this exhibition we explore the early history of aviation and the courageous women who took to the skies—aviatrixes who found freedom, broke new ground, and inspired generations of women along the way. This exhibition was created as part of the DPLA’s Digital Curation Program by the following students as part of Professor Debbie Rabina’s course "Information Services and Sources" in the School of Information and Library Science at Pratt Institute: Megan DeArmond, Diana Moronta, Laurin Paradise.

Subject:
U.S. History
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Unit of Study
Provider:
Digital Public Library of America
Pratt Institute
Provider Set:
DPLA Exhibitions
Author:
Diana Moronta
Megan DeArmond
Date Added:
03/01/2015
The American Founding in Practice: Ideals vs. Reality
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

The United States was founded on the principles of natural rights, equality, and classical republicanism, but how well did it actually live up to these ideals? In this lecture, Professor Rob McDonald of the US Military Academy at West Point describes the conflict between the ideals of the American Revolution and the unfortunate realities of the time.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Rob McDonald
Date Added:
10/31/2017
American Government Textbook
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating

This is an ADA compliant downloadable version of the American Government online textbook at U.S. History.org by The Independence Hall Association.

Subject:
U.S. History
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Barbara Soots
Date Added:
08/27/2019