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Acquiring Copyright Protection
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In this course, we’ll introduce you to copyrights and copyright protection. This program is of low difficulty and no prior knowledge of intellectual property law is required.

A copyright is an intellectual property device that protects a creative work from duplication if it is fixed in a tangible medium. The course will look at the types of creations that can be protected by copyright law and discuss federal copyright law as set forth in Title 17 of the United States code.

The course covers the copyright requirements of originality, creativity and fixation in a tangible medium. We will distinguish between non-copyrightable “ideas” and copyrightable expressions. We spend much of our time looking at the important applications of these ideas to computer programs and software, which have often rendered traditional copyright rules anachronistic. Included in this discussion are the effects of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998.

The course next turns to copyright duration, renewal and termination and how they are applied to copyrighted works based on the years that the works were created.

Finally, we will look at notice and registration, and compliance with registration and recording procedures with the United States Copyright Office. While these steps are not required for copyright protection to attach, we will discuss the important benefits that they bestow.

The goal of this program is to allow you to apply the copyright rules to determine whether work can be copyrighted, how copyright protection can be established and for how long the protection lasts. Enforcing copyrights and fair use and other defenses against copyright enforcement will be the subjects of another course.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Advanced Business Law Textbook
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This textbook provides context and essential concepts across the entire range of legal issues with which
managers and business executives must grapple. The text provides the vocabulary and legal acumen
necessary for businesspeople to talk in an educated way to their customers, employees, suppliers,
government officials—and to their own lawyers.

Subject:
Law
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Michelle Vos
Date Added:
05/10/2018
Advanced Business Law and the Legal Environment
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Mayer, Warner, Siedel and Lieberman's Advanced Business Law and the Legal Environment is an up-to-date textbook with coverage of legal and regulatory issues that are more technical than the topics in the authors' Foundations of Business Law and the Legal Environment.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Law
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Textbooks
Author:
Alyssa Rose Martina
Daniel Warner
Don Mayer
George J. Siedel
Jethro K. Lieberman
Date Added:
02/17/2015
The Age of Human Rights
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CC BY
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This is a syllabus for the course "The Age of Human Rights" (Capstone course – International Relations & International Law) designed for the University College Groningen (UCG), University of Groningen (the Netherlands). The syllabus is designed by taking into consideration the UCG’s focus on project-based education and it is further inspired by the design thinking approach to education.

This course aims to do two things. Firstly, to provide a good knowledge base on what international human rights are and what mechanisms exist to implement, supervise and enforce them. Secondly, to discuss in a critical manner how international human rights thinking has become inextricably linked to almost all areas of international cooperation. Students are asked to critically analyse specific human rights issues from a multi- or interdisciplinary perspective, thereby drawing upon information from the various disciplinary fields that they have covered in their programmes.

The first part of the course (6 sessions) is used to create the relevant knowledge base through interactive lectures. In the second part of the course (12 sessions), students are asked to work in small subgroups on particular issue areas which will be chosen in consultation with the instructors. The course concludes with a half-day conference on human rights in which the participating students act as panel members (this may be subject to change).

Subject:
Law
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Syllabus
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Mando Rachovitsa
Date Added:
05/19/2021
Alternative Dispute Resolution
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This course is a primer in methods by which legal disputes can be resolved without litigation, both by the parties themselves and under the auspices of the justice system.

This is an introductory level course and no prior knowledge or experience with dispute resolution or the justice system is necessary.

Our first module is an overview of the landscape of alternative dispute resolution and includes discussion of the Federal Arbitration Act, passed in 1925, which still largely governs ADR in the United States, and especially in the federal court system. The first module also introduces various other methods of dispute resolution.

Module 2 focuses on negotiation between the parties, specifically facilitation of settlements and the settlement process. We’ll also look at settlement negotiations that are required and supervised by courts in many cases. Finally, we will discuss settlement agreements and their requirements for enforceability.

Module 3 turns to mediation, which is more formal negotiation supervised by a mediator, but that does not result in a formal decision, as in the case of arbitration. The module looks at when mediation is appropriate and the role and responsibilities of the mediator. We also look at various styles of mediation and the governing bodies and organizations that discuss and encourage best practices.

Modules 4 and 5 discuss the most formal component of the ADR landscape: arbitration. Arbitration allows a binding resolution to be rendered outside of the court system. We will focus on arbitrator qualifications, arbitration procedures and arbitration agreements. In module five, we will look at the enforceability of arbitration awards and the mechanisms by which the awards can be confirmed in federal court so that they can be enforced by normal collection procedures.

This course should give you a thorough introduction to the world of alternative dispute resolution and serve as an important component of a comprehensive understanding of the processes by which disputes are resolved in our system.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Always Developing
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Welcome to this adult development course. This is the study of how and why people change or remain the same over time. Although this course is often offered in psychology, this is a very interdisciplinary course. Psychologists, nutritionists, sociologists, anthropologists, educators, and health care professionals all contribute to our knowledge of the life span. We will look at how we change physically over time from emerging and early adulthood through aging and death. We will examine cognitive change, or how our ability to think and remember changes over time. We will consider how our concerns and psychological state are influenced by age and finally, how our social relationships change throughout life.

Subject:
Psychology
Sociology
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
eCampusOntario
Author:
Anne Baird
Date Added:
05/05/2021
Anteprima del volume "I BACINI CULTURALI E LA PROGETTAZIONE SOCIALE ORIENTATA ALL’HERITAGE-MAKING, TRA POLITICHE GIOVANILI, INNOVAZIONE SOCIALE, DIVERSITÀ CULTURALE"
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Anteprima del volume "I BACINI CULTURALI E LA PROGETTAZIONE SOCIALE ORIENTATA ALL’HERITAGE-MAKING, TRA POLITICHE GIOVANILI, INNOVAZIONE SOCIALE, DIVERSITÀ CULTURALE. Il framework del Progetto ABACUS – Attivazione dei Bacini Culturali Siciliani, alla luce della Convenzione Quadro del Consiglio d'Europa sul valore del Patrimonio culturale per la società"

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Computer Science
Environmental Science
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Languages
Performing Arts
World Cultures
Management
Public Relations
Agriculture
Education
History
Law
Hydrology
Physical Geography
Social Science
Anthropology
Archaeology
Political Science
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Case Study
Interactive
Primary Source
Simulation
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Author:
ABACUS Project Activation of Cultural Basins
Date Added:
12/22/2020
Authentic Summative Assessment for Business Entities
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This assignment provides the opportunity for students to:Compare and contrast the nontax operational features of various entity forms including formalities, rights and duties of owners, liabilities, effect of bankruptcy and dissolution.Develop a list of questions to ask a business owner/client in order to perform an analysis and determine the appropriate entity form for the business.Interview a business owner to determine the owner’s specific needs concerning control, rights and duties, liabilities, taxes, formalities, effect of bankruptcy, and dissolution.Evaluate the owner’s answers to the questions concerning specific needs related to control, rights and duties, liabilities, taxes, formalities, effect of bankruptcy, and dissolution.Recommend an appropriate business form based on the business owner’s specific needs.Justify choices in making a recommendation (justification based on readings).Draft appropriate entity paperwork you would file with the Idaho Secretary of State.Communicate effectively by writing documents that are clear, concise, and compelling.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Accounting
Law
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Michelle Vos
Elaine Watson
Allan Heaps
Date Added:
05/13/2019
Authenticity/Agency Rubrics (Version 1)
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
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The Authenticity and Agency rubrics are based on elements from two frameworks: Student as Producer and Social Pedagogies. The rubrics were created for instructors and instructional designers to use as they develop authentic learning experiences in the course design process.

Subject:
Applied Science
Arts and Humanities
Business and Communication
Career and Technical Education
Education
English Language Arts
History
Law
Life Science
Mathematics
Physical Science
Social Science
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Jennifer Englund
Annette McNamara
Date Added:
01/29/2019
Basics of Bankruptcy Law
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CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
5.0 stars

This video-course surveys bankruptcy law and focuses on the most common forms of bankruptcy and most important rules. The course opens by looking at the structure of the bankruptcy code, the system of bankruptcy courts and roles of federal and state law in the bankruptcy process. We also look at the roles of the debtor, the creditors, the court and the bankruptcy trustee.

We then focus on rules common to bankruptcy proceeding, including the all-important automatic stay, the effects of bankruptcy discharge and exempt property.

Module 2-4 look at the specifics of the three most common types of bankruptcies: those under Chapters 7, 11 and 13 of the Bankruptcy Code. In each case, we’ll look at eligibility and the rules, qualifications and procedures that govern bankruptcy under that Chapter.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy is liquidation, wherein all the assets of the debtor except for exempt property are vulnerable to collection, but which affords the debtor a discharge on most outstanding debts. We’ll look at the requirements for achieving this relief, the procedures followed by the trustee and the scope of the allowable discharge.

Chapter 11 and 13 are “plan” bankruptcies, under which the debtor re-organizes debts in negotiation with the creditors and under court supervision. Generally, Chapter 11 is used by companies, while Chapter 13 is only available for individuals. In both cases, we’ll look at the timelines and processes of the proceedings and the enforcement, modification or conversion of the applicable bankruptcy proceeding.

Finally, in Module 5, we’ll look at the forms and filings applicable to bankruptcy proceedings, including the petition, schedules and filing fees. We’ll also briefly look at bankruptcy crimes and penalties and other some laws that affect bankruptcy cases.

Once you complete this course, you should have a comprehensive understanding of the structure of the Bankruptcy Code and system, an understanding of how the bankruptcy system works and a basis upon which to research and learn more detailed necessary information.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
stephen haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Basics of Civil Litigation
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This video-course is a survey of the civil litigation process, from the filing through appeals, though the discovery process is left for our video-courses in discovery.

This is an introductory level course and no prior knowledge of law or the litigation process is required.

The course starts with an overview of the American court system, both on the state and federal levels. We’ll go over the separate systems, their roles and where they interact. We’ll also focus on the roles of the Supreme Court as the top of both systems for federal and constitutional issues. We also look at the questions of which courts to file in and which laws to apply – the questions of jurisdiction, venue and choice of law.

In module 2, we look at the pleadings: the complaint, answer, counterclaim, crossclaim, etc. We’ll examine the requirements of each of these documents and their elements. We’ll also look at the various types of motions that might be filed in response to pleadings.

Module 3 focuses on pre-trial practice. We’ll look at joinder of parties and joinder of claims. We’ll also look at the preclusion doctrines of res judicata and collateral estoppel, on which basis cases or claims can be dismissed as having been already litigated. We’ll look at class action lawsuits and their requirements. We’ll also focus on the filing, the summons and the service of process requirements to start a civil action. Finally, we’ll discuss impleaders and interpleaders, two other types of civil complaints.

Module 4 covers the trial process. We’ll focus on trial by jury and on the standards of proof and upon whom the burdens of proof rest. We’ll also go through the trial process itself, highlighting the federal rules that govern each step.

In the last module, we’ll look at the post-trial process. We’ll start with the motions that can be filed after the judgment, including motions for judgment notwithstanding the verdict, for new trial and for relief from judgment. Then, we’ll turn to the next step for a losing party: the appeal. We’ll use the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure as the basis for our discussion of this process. Finally, we’ll briefly look at the execution and collection of judgments, though those are covered in more detail in other courses.

We hope that this course will be a springboard to allow you to take more specific LawShelf video-courses that cover the litigation process and that this survey will help you understand the American civil litigation process.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Basics of Contracts Law
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This is an introductory level course and no prior knowledge of law or contracts is required.

This course is a survey of basic contract law across a variety of areas. The first three modules cover the nature of contracts and the basic building blocks of contracts: offer, acceptance and consideration. The nuances of each element are considered, and the course focuses on rules such as the mirror image rule, the mailbox rule, mutuality of consideration and promissory estoppel. We also focus on the Uniform Commercial Code and its rules for contracts for the sale of goods.

In Module 4, we cover contract defenses, which allow contracts to be unenforceable despite the building blocks of the contract being in place. Defenses include illegality, incapacity, duress, unconscionability, undue influence, mistake and fraud. We will also look at the statute of frauds, which requires certain contracts to be in writing to be enforceable.

Our final module covers performance and breach, discussing when a contract has been breached and when one party’s breach allows the other party to cease performance. The module also covers contract remedies, which is the study of how contract damages are measured and when specific performance, where the court orders someone to do something, it an appropriate contracts remedy.

This course should give you an understanding of how contract law works the tools to continue with more advanced studies of more specific areas of contract and transactional law.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Basics of Criminal Law
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5.0 stars

This video-course surveys crimes and their punishments under the state and federal justice systems in the United States. We’ll focus on the natures and elements of the most common crimes and criminal law defenses.

This is an introductory level course and no prior knowledge of law or criminal law is required.

We’ll start the course by looking at the reasons for punishing crime and the various states of mind that are necessary to establish criminal culpability. We’ll also look at constitutional limitations on criminal law, including due process and the “cruel and unusual punishment” prohibition. We’ll also look at the sources of criminal law, including state statutes, case law and the Model Penal Code.

In module 2, we’ll look at “inchoate” crimes, which are crimes that are punishable even if the criminal acts contemplated are never carried out or completed. These include conspiracy, attempt, solicitation, facilitation and incitement. We’ll also discuss the after-the-fact crime of obstruction of justice.

In modules 3 and 4, we’ll turn to discussions of specific crimes. In module 3, we’ll look at violent crimes, such as homicide, rape, assault and arson. In module 4, we’ll turn to financial crimes, including theft, robbery, burglary, extortion and forgery.

In our final module, we’ll turn to defenses to criminal charges. We’ll discuss the requirements and limitations to many of these. They include self-defense, defense of others, necessity, duress, consent, insanity, diminished capacity, mistake, infancy and entrapment.

When you complete this course, you should have a broad understanding of crimes and the framework on which our criminal justice system works. This will make more advanced courses, such as white-collar crime and those that discuss complex criminal laws such as securities fraud, easier to understand and apply.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Basics of Environmental Law
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CC BY-NC-ND
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This course takes you through the federal laws and regulations that seek to protect our environment. It discusses landmark legislation such as the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act and Endangered Species Act and looks at how these laws are administered by the Environmental Protection Agency.

This is an introductory level course and no prior knowledge of law is required.

We will start the course by looking at remedies for environmental damages that are available under the common-law and standard tort rules, few though they are. We will look at environmental lawsuits based on trespass, nuisance and negligent and strict liability tort causes of action. We will also look at anti—SLAPP laws that many states have passed to protect people who file lawsuits against big companies for environmental and other injuries.

Module two moves to air pollution control and the clean air act. We will look at the reasons behind the statute and what it covers. We’ll discuss the pollutants regulated by the act and the national ambient air quality standards, which are set by the EPA to protect the public health. We will also discuss the state, federal and cooperative regulatory structure under which air pollution controls are enforced.

Module three moves to clean water, focusing mainly on the Clean Water Act, also administered by the Environmental Protection Agency. This time, we will look at the national pollutant discharge elimination system, which regulates point sources that discharge pollutants into the waters of the United States. We will also look at wetlands protection, storm water runoff and other areas also controlled by clean water legislation.

Module four segues to a wide variety of other pieces of environmental legislation. These include the Toxic Substances Control Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and many others. We will look at the roles of each of these acts in the landscape of environmental regulation.

Our final module looks at the protection of public lands and wildlife, including the Endangered Species Act, wildlife protection legislation and public land conservation. We will focus specifically on the balancing tests that must be applied to ensure that economically viable use can be made of public and private lands while keeping damage to the environment minimal.

When you complete this course, you will understand the key pieces of environmental legislation and their roles in the comprehensive framework of environmental protection.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson Plan
Author:
stephen haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Basics of Federal Income Taxation
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CC BY-NC-ND
Rating
5.0 stars

This course provides an overview of how income is calculated and taxed on the federal level and helps prepare students for more advanced courses in taxation.

The first two modules focus on defining gross income. While the Internal Revenue Code describes income as being taxable from “whatever source derived,” it also devotes scores of statutes and regulations to illustrating what constitutes income. In Module 1, we’ll look at wages and business income, which employee fringe benefits are counted as income, capital gains, dividends, rents, royalties and others. Module 2 turns to income derived from annuities, pensions, social security, retirement account distributions and other sources. We’ll also survey the types of income specifically exempted by the Code as non-taxable.

Modules 3 and 4 turn to income tax deductions. In Module 3, we’ll look at personal deductions, which includes a discussion of the standard deduction and itemized deductions on Schedule A. We’ll also look at deductions and limits thereon for interest paid, state and local taxes, casualty losses and charitable contributions. In Module 4, we’ll look at deductions more relevant to businesses and business activities. These include costs of doing business, depreciation and amortization and other corporate and business deductions. We’ll also focus on the qualified business income deduction, a boon for small businesses under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.

In our final module, we’ll look at tax credits, which allow dollar-for-dollar setoffs of federal income tax. We’ll look at tax credits related to children and dependents, education credits, various other credits and the important “earned income tax credit,” which provides substantial tax benefits for low-income taxpayers. Finally, we’ll look at the alternative minimum tax (AMT), which ensures that high-income taxpayers pay at least a minimum level of income taxes in spite of their possible deductions.

When you complete this course, you will understand how federal income tax is assessed, what constitutes income and have a firm grasp of the most important federal income tax deductions and credits.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Finance
Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Basics of Immigration Law
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This course is a survey of immigration law, from illegal entrants to legal nonimmigrant entrants to lawful permanent residents to naturalized citizens.

This is an introductory level course and no prior knowledge of law or immigration is required.

The course starts with an explanation of the structure of US immigration law and the continuing economic and social forces that affect it. We’ll also cover the roles of the branches of government and discuss why immigration law is almost exclusively in the federal sphere. We’ll also go over the various federal statutes that govern immigration law.

Module 2 looks at nonimmigrant entry into the United States. We’ll look at the visa waiver program and then at the many visa classes available. We’ll also look trusted traveler programs that make entry easier, such as Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI and FAST.

Module turns to “lawful permanent residents,” otherwise known as “green card” holders. We’ll discuss the eligibility criteria and the process to obtain this coveted status. We’ll also look at how refugees and asylum seekers can earn green cards.

Module 4 turns to the ultimate step an immigrant can achieve: US citizenship by naturalization. We’ll look at the benefits of citizenship and the pathways to citizenship. We’ll go through the step-by-step naturalization process in detail and look at the standards by which the USCIS evaluates citizenship applications.

Finally, we’ll focus on immigration law in the scheme of international laws. We’ll look at treaties and other international laws and the problem of refugees and how international law and American law deals with them. We’ll also take a look at recent trends in immigration law in the US and global systems.

We are confident that this course will give you a solid background in immigration law and will be an excellent first step in learning this complex but important and relevant area of law.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Breaching Experiment Assignment Instructions (Canada)
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CC BY-NC
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Instructions for a group norm violation (breaching experiment) and paper used in a first year sociology class. This assignment must be used with caution and depending on student maturity level.  

Subject:
Sociology
Material Type:
Assessment
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Katherine Lyon
Date Added:
09/30/2021
Business Operating Agreements
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This course de-constructs the process of preparing agreements that govern businesses, including corporations, LLCs and partnerships. We will go through the purposes of business governing agreements, discuss how to start the process and focus on ensuring that agreements satisfy the business’ needs and comply with applicable law.

This course is an intermediate level course that builds on the basics of business forms. It is recommended that users take this course after taking the Business Organizations video-course unless the user has background in the rules of business organizations.

The course starts with discussion of business governing agreements and their roles in establishing businesses. We will discuss the differences between various business forms and the types of agreements that are necessary or useful for each of them.

In module two, we will look at essential provisions of most business agreements. Provisions relating to organizational purpose, ownership structure and management information are common to all businesses, though the structure of ownership and management depends heavily on the business’ form. We also look at common provisions such as those relating to financial affairs, dissolution, capital accounts and record-keeping.

In module three, will turn to the effects of state law on governing agreements. While companies have broad discretion to determine the contents of their governing agreements, they must comply with state restrictions on management, timing and other requirements. We also look at the variances between state laws applying to corporations, partnerships and LLCs.

Module four looks at governing agreements’ roles in modifying or enforcing fiduciary responsibilities of the managers. We will discuss these responsibilities and the extent to which they can be modified by agreement. We also look at indemnification, lawsuit barriers and restrictive clauses that seek to limit the liabilities of managers.

Finally, the last module is a practical exercise. We’ll look at a sample corporation’s use of template provisions and show how they should be modified to allow the company maximum flexibility and ensure compliance with state law. We’ll look at several examples of how to re-draft template provisions that might be ineffective or inefficient with regard to a particular business enterprise.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019
Business Organizations
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CC BY-NC-ND
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In this course, we’ll introduce you to the wide array of business forms, discuss how to create specific business entities, and explain the benefits and pitfalls of each type of business organization. This is an introductory level course and no prior experience or knowledge of business law is necessary.

A business organization is an entity formed to advance a commercial enterprise. It can be formed by one person or multiple people. We interact with businesses daily and they drive our nation’s economy.

This course begins by discussing the types of business entities and the state and federal laws that impact business formation. We will spend much of our time describing the factors an entrepreneur should consider prior to forming a business, such as liability, ownership, costs, taxation and transferability of ownership interests.

We will then move to specific entities, starting with partnerships. We will discuss the benefits of partnership formation and consider the categories of partnerships before explaining partners’ rights and duties to one another and to the partnership.

In the next part of the course, we will focus on corporations. We’ll start with closely held corporations, including the “S corporation,” which is a pass-through entity for tax purposes. We’ll consider the process of incorporation and we will use examples to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of the corporate form.

In the latter half of our course, we’ll explore larger business organizations. We’ll discuss publicly traded companies, including the process of going public. We’ll also focus on how large corporations are managed and the roles of shareholders, directors and officers of a corporation. We will conclude by looking at limited liability companies, focusing on their benefits over other business forms and their operations.

Subject:
Law
General Law
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lesson
Lesson Plan
Author:
Stephen Haas
Date Added:
12/11/2019