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101 Ways To Kickstart Your Day In A Positive Way
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This is a resource that you can use online or in class. It is a great way to start a conversation with a student on the importance of just living for today.

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Communication
Education
Psychology
Material Type:
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Susan Spellman Cann
Erin Luong
Date Added:
07/31/2020
Adolescent & Adult Development - A Learning Classrooms Perspective
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Students enrolled in an Adolescent and Adult Development Psychology course at Boise State University collaborated to create a blog answering this prompt: Summarize and integrate what we have learned so far in this course about the adolescent period of life, focusing particularly on the importance of family and friends as sources of socialization and as responders to the physical and mental changes that adolescents are undergoing.Authors: Heather Whittaker, Parker Rising Evans, Shyann Gambill, Jesse Peters, Brooklynn Adams, Maddie Blew, Chase Dreksler, Kyle Dumpel, Sophia Falsev, Hanah Hazel, Daddy Boy Huddy-Nahalea, Rael Jensen, Kylie Johnson, Alex Low, Carson Manning, Melissa Ness, Taylor Oxley, Jacqueline Reyes, Hailey Reynolds, Colin Shillingburg, Hannah Swenson, Austin Thompson, Julie Vasilyev, and Cooper Wilcox  

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Author:
Anneke Steneker
Date Added:
12/17/2019
Adolescent Development
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These blogs are written for the purpose of providing knowledge to people who want to learn more about adolescent development. Through these various writings, there will be different types of information to learn about adolescent behavior in today's world. Enjoy. 

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Rael Jensen
Date Added:
12/19/2019
Adolescent Development in the Modern World
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The process of adolescent development has always been complex, with a myriad of biological, mental, and social changes. In our increasingly complex world it becomes even more difficult for adolescents to navigate their way into adulthood. The following selections touch on topics such as first jobs, international identity, relationships, social media, and others to get a glimpse at what life is like for the youth of today and hopefully offer insight and advice to parents and their adolescents.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Lacy Harness
Date Added:
12/17/2019
Adolescent Work
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This video covers the topic of adolescent work and how to effectively teach this topic. This video includes Learning Objectives, a lesson plan, and ideas for learning activities. 

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lecture
Author:
Trey Dickson
Date Added:
12/23/2019
An Agenda for Purely Confirmatory Research
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The veracity of substantive research claims hinges on the way experimental data are collected and analyzed. In this article, we discuss an uncomfortable fact that threatens the core of psychology’s academic enterprise: almost without exception, psychologists do not commit themselves to a method of data analysis before they see the actual data. It then becomes tempting to fine tune the analysis to the data in order to obtain a desired result—a procedure that invalidates the interpretation of the common statistical tests. The extent of the fine tuning varies widely across experiments and experimenters but is almost impossible for reviewers and readers to gauge. To remedy the situation, we propose that researchers preregister their studies and indicate in advance the analyses they intend to conduct. Only these analyses deserve the label “confirmatory,” and only for these analyses are the common statistical tests valid. Other analyses can be carried out but these should be labeled “exploratory.” We illustrate our proposal with a confirmatory replication attempt of a study on extrasensory perception.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Perspectives on Psychological Science
Author:
Denny Borsboom
Eric-Jan Wagenmakers
Han L. J. van der Maas
Rogier A. Kievit
Ruud Wetzels
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Analysis of Open Data and Computational Reproducibility in Registered Reports in Psychology
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Ongoing technological developments have made it easier than ever before for scientists to share their data, materials, and analysis code. Sharing data and analysis code makes it easier for other researchers to re-use or check published research. These benefits will only emerge if researchers can reproduce the analysis reported in published articles, and if data is annotated well enough so that it is clear what all variables mean. Because most researchers have not been trained in computational reproducibility, it is important to evaluate current practices to identify practices that can be improved. We examined data and code sharing, as well as computational reproducibility of the main results, without contacting the original authors, for Registered Reports published in the psychological literature between 2014 and 2018. Of the 62 articles that met our inclusion criteria, data was available for 40 articles, and analysis scripts for 37 articles. For the 35 articles that shared both data and code and performed analyses in SPSS, R, Python, MATLAB, or JASP, we could run the scripts for 31 articles, and reproduce the main results for 20 articles. Although the articles that shared both data and code (35 out of 62, or 56%) and articles that could be computationally reproduced (20 out of 35, or 57%) was relatively high compared to other studies, there is clear room for improvement. We provide practical recommendations based on our observations, and link to examples of good research practices in the papers we reproduced.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Daniel Lakens
Jaroslav Gottfried
Nicholas Alvaro Coles
Pepijn Obels
Seth Ariel Green
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Análisis de poder estadístico y cálculo de tamaño de muestra en R: Guía práctica
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Esta guía práctica acompaña la serie de videos Poder estadístico y tamaño de muestra en R, de mi canal de YouTube Investigación Abierta, que recomiendo ver antes de leer este documento. Contiene una explicación general del análisis de poder estadístico y cálculo de tamaño de muestra, centrándose en el procedimiento para realizar análisis de poder y tamaños de muestra en jamovi y particularmente en R, usando los paquetes pwr (para diseños sencillos) y Superpower (para diseños factoriales más complejos). La sección dedicada a pwr está ampliamente basada en este video de Daniel S. Quintana (2019).

Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Biology
Statistics and Probability
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Juan David Leongómez
Date Added:
08/18/2020
Remix
Archival Research, Case Studies, and Developmental Research Designs
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After reading this module, you will be able to:Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of archivall research and case studiesDescribe longitudinal, cross-sectional, and sequential research designs

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Lisa Bauer
Date Added:
03/15/2019
Remix
Archival Research, Case Studies, and Developmental Research Designs
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CC BY-NC
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After reading this module, you will be able to:Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of archivall research and case studiesDescribe longitudinal, cross-sectional, and sequential research designs

Subject:
Social Science
Psychology
Material Type:
Module
Author:
Lisa Bauer
Date Added:
03/18/2019
Are Psychology Journals Anti-replication? A Snapshot of Editorial Practices
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Recent research in psychology has highlighted a number of replication problems in the discipline, with publication bias – the preference for publishing original and positive results, and a resistance to publishing negative results and replications- identified as one reason for replication failure. However, little empirical research exists to demonstrate that journals explicitly refuse to publish replications. We reviewed the instructions to authors and the published aims of 1151 psychology journals and examined whether they indicated that replications were permitted and accepted. We also examined whether journal practices differed across branches of the discipline, and whether editorial practices differed between low and high impact journals. Thirty three journals (3%) stated in their aims or instructions to authors that they accepted replications. There was no difference between high and low impact journals. The implications of these findings for psychology are discussed.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Frontiers in Psychology
Author:
G. N. Martin
Richard M. Clarke
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Are We Wasting a Good Crisis? The Availability of Psychological Research Data after the Storm
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To study the availability of psychological research data, we requested data from 394 papers, published in all issues of four APA journals in 2012. We found that 38% of the researchers sent their data immediately or after reminders. These findings are in line with estimates of the willingness to share data in psychology from the recent or remote past. Although the recent crisis of confidence that shook psychology has highlighted the importance of open research practices, and technical developments have greatly facilitated data sharing, our findings make clear that psychology is nowhere close to being an open science.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Author:
Gert Storms
Leen Deriemaecker
Maarten Vermorgen
Wolf Vanpaemel
Date Added:
06/23/2020
Are We Wasting a Good Crisis? The Availability of Psychological Research Data after the Storm
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To study the availability of psychological research data, we requested data from 394 papers, published in all issues of four APA journals in 2012. We found that 38% of the researchers sent their data immediately or after reminders. These findings are in line with estimates of the willingness to share data in psychology from the recent or remote past. Although the recent crisis of confidence that shook psychology has highlighted the importance of open research practices, and technical developments have greatly facilitated data sharing, our findings make clear that psychology is nowhere close to being an open science.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Collabra: Psychology
Author:
Gert Storms
Leen Deriemaecker
Maarten Vermorgen
Wolf Vanpaemel
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Are choices based on conditional or conjunctive probabilities in a sequential risk-taking task?
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In this study, we examined participants' choice behavior in a sequential risk-taking task. We were especially interested in the extent to which participants focus on the immediate next choice or consider the entire choice sequence. To do so, we inspected whether decisions were either based on conditional probabilities (e.g., being successful on the immediate next trial) or on conjunctive probabilities (of being successful several times in a row). The results of five experiments with a simplified nine-card Columbia Card Task and a CPT-model analysis show that participants' choice behavior can be described best by a mixture of the two probability types. Specifically, for their first choice, the participants relied on conditional probabilities, whereas subsequent choices were based on conjunctive probabilities. This strategy occurred across different start conditions in which more or less cards were already presented face up. Consequently, the proportion of risky choices was substantially higher when participants started from a state with some cards facing up, compared with when they arrived at that state starting from the very beginning. The results, alternative accounts, and implications are discussed.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Journal of Behavioral Decision Making
Author:
Peter Haffke
Ronald Hübner
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Badges for sharing data and code at Biostatistics: an observational study
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Background: The reproducibility policy at the journal Biostatistics rewards articles with badges for data and code sharing. This study investigates the effect of badges at increasing reproducible research. Methods: The setting of this observational study is the Biostatistics and Statistics in Medicine (control journal) online research archives. The data consisted of 240 randomly sampled articles from 2006 to 2013 (30 articles per year) per journal. Data analyses included: plotting probability of data and code sharing by article submission date, and Bayesian logistic regression modelling. Results: The probability of data sharing was higher at Biostatistics than the control journal but the probability of code sharing was comparable for both journals. The probability of data sharing increased by 3.9 times (95% credible interval: 1.5 to 8.44 times, p-value probability that sharing increased: 0.998) after badges were introduced at Biostatistics. On an absolute scale, this difference was only a 7.6% increase in data sharing (95% CI: 2 to 15%, p-value: 0.998). Badges did not have an impact on code sharing at the journal (mean increase: 1 time, 95% credible interval: 0.03 to 3.58 times, p-value probability that sharing increased: 0.378). 64% of articles at Biostatistics that provide data/code had broken links, and at Statistics in Medicine, 40%; assuming these links worked only slightly changed the effect of badges on data (mean increase: 6.7%, 95% CI: 0.0% to 17.0%, p-value: 0.974) and on code (mean increase: -2%, 95% CI: -10.0 to 7.0%, p-value: 0.286). Conclusions: The effect of badges at Biostatistics was a 7.6% increase in the data sharing rate, 5 times less than the effect of badges at Psychological Science. Though badges at Biostatistics did not impact code sharing, and had a moderate effect on data sharing, badges are an interesting step that journals are taking to incentivise and promote reproducible research.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
F1000Research
Author:
Adrian G. Barnett
Anisa Rowhani-Farid
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Badges to Acknowledge Open Practices: A Simple, Low-Cost, Effective Method for Increasing Transparency
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Beginning January 2014, Psychological Science gave authors the opportunity to signal open data and materials if they qualified for badges that accompanied published articles. Before badges, less than 3% of Psychological Science articles reported open data. After badges, 23% reported open data, with an accelerating trend; 39% reported open data in the first half of 2015, an increase of more than an order of magnitude from baseline. There was no change over time in the low rates of data sharing among comparison journals. Moreover, reporting openness does not guarantee openness. When badges were earned, reportedly available data were more likely to be actually available, correct, usable, and complete than when badges were not earned. Open materials also increased to a weaker degree, and there was more variability among comparison journals. Badges are simple, effective signals to promote open practices and improve preservation of data and materials by using independent repositories.

Subject:
Biology
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
PLOS Biology
Author:
Agnieszka Slowik
Brian A. Nosek
Carina Sonnleitner
Chelsey Hess-Holden
Curtis Kennett
Erica Baranski
Lina-Sophia Falkenberg
Ljiljana B. Lazarević
Mallory C. Kidwell
Sarah Piechowski
Susann Fiedler
Timothy M. Errington
Tom E. Hardwicke
Date Added:
08/07/2020
A Bayesian Perspective on the Reproducibility Project: Psychology
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We revisit the results of the recent Reproducibility Project: Psychology by the Open Science Collaboration. We compute Bayes factors—a quantity that can be used to express comparative evidence for an hypothesis but also for the null hypothesis—for a large subset (N = 72) of the original papers and their corresponding replication attempts. In our computation, we take into account the likely scenario that publication bias had distorted the originally published results. Overall, 75% of studies gave qualitatively similar results in terms of the amount of evidence provided. However, the evidence was often weak (i.e., Bayes factor < 10). The majority of the studies (64%) did not provide strong evidence for either the null or the alternative hypothesis in either the original or the replication, and no replication attempts provided strong evidence in favor of the null. In all cases where the original paper provided strong evidence but the replication did not (15%), the sample size in the replication was smaller than the original. Where the replication provided strong evidence but the original did not (10%), the replication sample size was larger. We conclude that the apparent failure of the Reproducibility Project to replicate many target effects can be adequately explained by overestimation of effect sizes (or overestimation of evidence against the null hypothesis) due to small sample sizes and publication bias in the psychological literature. We further conclude that traditional sample sizes are insufficient and that a more widespread adoption of Bayesian methods is desirable.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
PLOS ONE
Author:
Alexander Etz
Joachim Vandekerckhove
Date Added:
08/07/2020
Bayesian inference for psychology. Part II: Example applications with JASP
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Bayesian hypothesis testing presents an attractive alternative to p value hypothesis testing. Part I of this series outlined several advantages of Bayesian hypothesis testing, including the ability to quantify evidence and the ability to monitor and update this evidence as data come in, without the need to know the intention with which the data were collected. Despite these and other practical advantages, Bayesian hypothesis tests are still reported relatively rarely. An important impediment to the widespread adoption of Bayesian tests is arguably the lack of user-friendly software for the run-of-the-mill statistical problems that confront psychologists for the analysis of almost every experiment: the t-test, ANOVA, correlation, regression, and contingency tables. In Part II of this series we introduce JASP (http://www.jasp-stats.org), an open-source, cross-platform, user-friendly graphical software package that allows users to carry out Bayesian hypothesis tests for standard statistical problems. JASP is based in part on the Bayesian analyses implemented in Morey and Rouder’s BayesFactor package for R. Armed with JASP, the practical advantages of Bayesian hypothesis testing are only a mouse click away.

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
Author:
Akash Raj
Alexander Etz
Alexander Ly
Alexandra Sarafoglou
Bruno Boutin
Damian Dropmann
Don van den Bergh
Dora Matzke
Eric-Jan Wagenmakers
Erik-Jan van Kesteren
Frans Meerhoff
Helen Steingroever
Jeffrey N. Rouder
Johnny van Doorn
Jonathon Love
Josine Verhagen
Koen Derks
Maarten Marsman
Martin Šmíra
Patrick Knight
Quentin F. Gronau
Ravi Selker
Richard D. Morey
Sacha Epskamp
Tahira Jamil
Tim de Jong
Date Added:
08/07/2020