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Advanced Artificial Intelligence
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CC BY
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This course will present advanced topics in Artificial Intelligence (AI), including inquiries into logic, artificial neural network and machine learning, and the Turing machine. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define the term 'intelligent agent,' list major problems in AI, and identify the major approaches to AI; translate problems into graphs and encode the procedures that search the solutions with the graph data structures; explain the differences between various types of logic and basic statistical tools used in AI; list the different types of learning algorithms and explain why they are different; list the most common methods of statistical learning and classification and explain the basic differences between them; describe the components of Turing machine; name the most important propositions in the philosophy of AI; list the major issues pertaining to the creation of machine consciousness; design a reasonable software agent with java code. (Computer Science 408)

Subject:
Computer Science
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/16/2011
Animals & Ethics 101: Thinking Critically About Animal Rights
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CC BY-SA
Rating
4.0 stars

This book provides an overview of the current debates about the nature and extent of our moral obligations to animals. Which, if any, uses of animals are morally wrong, which are morally permissible (i.e., not wrong) and why? What, if any, moral obligations do we, individually and as a society (and a global community), have towards animals and why? How should animals be treated? Why?

We will explore the most influential and most developed answers to these questions – given by philosophers, scientists, and animal advocates and their critics – to try to determine which positions are supported by the best moral reasons.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Nathan Nobis
Date Added:
11/26/2019
Animals & Ethics 101: Thinking Critically About Animal Rights
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CC BY-SA
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0.0 stars

This book provides an overview of the current debates about the nature and extent of our moral obligations to animals. Which, if any, uses of animals are morally wrong, which are morally permissible (i.e., not wrong) and why? What, if any, moral obligations do we, individually and as a society (and a global community), have towards animals and why? How should animals be treated? Why?

We will explore the most influential and most developed answers to these questions – given by philosophers, scientists, and animal advocates and their critics – to try to determine which positions are supported by the best moral reasons.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Nathan Nobis
Date Added:
11/18/2021
Are Ethics Fixed? Animal Welfare Exercise
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CC BY
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Using the Animal Ethics Dilemma website, this flipped classroom exercise can be used to stimulate discussion about situation ethics in animal welfare

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Date Added:
04/28/2016
Arguing Using Critical Thinking
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CC BY-NC-SA
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There is a quote that has been passed down many years and is most recently accounted to P.T. Barnum, “There is a sucker born every minute.” Are you that sucker? If you were, would you like to be “reborn?” The goal of this book is to help you through that “birthing” process. Critical thinking and standing up for your ideas and making decisions are important in both your personal and professional life. How good are we at making the decision to marry? According to the Centers for Disease Control, there is one divorce in America every 36 seconds. That is nearly 2,400 every day. And professionally, the Wall Street Journal predicts the average person will have 7 careers in their lifetime. Critical thinking skills are crucial.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
LibreTexts
Author:
Jim Marteney
Date Added:
11/18/2021
Augustine on the Goodness of All Things
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CC BY-ND
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Augustine argues that everything that exists is good.  His argument is criticized, showing how arguments of the same form could show that completely blackened pans cannot exist and that God is an impossible object.   So, the paper shows how to paradoy an argument by giving parallel reasoning that yields absurd conclusions. 

Subject:
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Module
Author:
William Holly
Date Added:
11/23/2019
Remix
Beyond facts and statistics: Restoring order to how we understand logos in writing
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource aims to generate ideas and possibilities about how to advance student understanding of logic in writing beyond the notion that logic is always a collection of data points or a reference to facts. Instead of reducing logic to numbers and statements, this source hopes to introduce students and teachers to the existential questions that are always involved in the logical appeals of a text: how do we know what we know and why does it matter?

Subject:
Literature
Philosophy
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Samuel Sullivan
Date Added:
06/02/2020
Beyond facts and statistics: Restoring order to how we understand logos in writing
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

This resource aims to generate ideas and possibilities about how to advance student understanding of logic in writing beyond the notion that logic is always a collection of data points or a reference to facts. Instead of reducing logic to numbers and statements, this source hopes to introduce students and teachers to the existential questions that are always involved in the logical appeals of a text: how do we know what we know and why does it matter?

Subject:
Literature
Philosophy
Composition and Rhetoric
Reading Literature
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Author:
Bryan Harvey
Date Added:
12/21/2019
Bioethics: An Introduction Lecture Series
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CC BY-NC-SA
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An introductory series by Marianne Talbot exploring bioethical theories and their philosophical foundations. These podcasts will explain key moral theories, common moral arguments, and some background logic.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Marianne Talbot
Date Added:
05/29/2012
A Brief Introduction to Philosophy
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CC BY-NC-SA
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An introduction to philosophy with selections on metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and logic. The emphasis is on exposing students to important philosophers and issues in philosophy. Chapters include multiple choice questions to test reading comprehension.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Open Education Alberta
Author:
Yoni Porat
Date Added:
08/16/2021
CIENCIA, ÉTICA Y SOCIEDAD (2016)
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CC BY-NC-ND
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0.0 stars

Con la clonación, la energía nuclear y la investigación con células madre, la ciencia sigue progresando rápidamente. Pero en este contexto, el debate sobre la ética en la ciencia ha vuelto a ponerse de actualidad en el siglo XXI.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings
Provider Set:
Mini Lectures
Date Added:
04/13/2018
A Concise Introduction to Logic
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CC BY-NC-SA
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A Concise Introduction to Logic is an introduction to formal logic suitable for undergraduates taking a general education course in logic or critical thinking, and is accessible and useful to any interested in gaining a basic understanding of logic. This text takes the unique approach of teaching logic through intellectual history; the author uses examples from important and celebrated arguments in philosophy to illustrate logical principles. The text also includes a basic introduction to findings of advanced logic. As indicators of where the student could go next with logic, the book closes with an overview of advanced topics, such as the axiomatic method, set theory, Peano arithmetic, and modal logic. Throughout, the text uses brief, concise chapters that readers will find easy to read and to review.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Milne Publishing
Author:
Craig DeLancey
Date Added:
03/27/2017
A Concise Introduction to Logic
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CC BY-NC-SA
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A Concise Introduction to Logic is an introduction to formal logic suitable for undergraduates taking a general education course in logic or critical thinking, and is accessible and useful to any interested in gaining a basic understanding of logic. This text takes the unique approach of teaching logic through intellectual history.

Subject:
Philosophy
Mathematics
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
eCampusOntario
Author:
Craig DeLancey
Date Added:
03/10/2020
Confessions by St. Augustine
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CC BY-SA
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0.0 stars

Confessions is the name of an autobiographical work, consisting of 13 books, by St. Augustine of Hippo, written in Latin between AD 397 and 400. Modern English translations of it are sometimes published under the title The Confessions of St. Augustine in order to distinguish the book from other books with similar titles. Its original title was Confessions in Thirteen Books, and it was composed to be read out loud with each book being a complete unit. It is generally considered one of Augustine's most important texts.

Subject:
Philosophy
History
Material Type:
Case Study
Reading
Provider:
Wikisource
Author:
St. Augustine
Date Added:
01/27/2017
Confucianism Explained
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CC BY-NC-ND
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5.0 stars

This video explains the teachings of Confucius. Education is the path to moral excellence, which is central to building a harmonious society. Education is a lifelong process and the purpose of learning is to acquire virtues.

Subject:
Philosophy
Religious Studies
World Cultures
History
Ancient History
World History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Module
Unit of Study
Author:
Anupama Mande
Date Added:
07/09/2020
Conversations with History: A Surgeon’s Journey Beyond Science
Read the Fine Print
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes neurosurgeon Allan J. Hamilton for a discussion of his new book: the Scalpel and the Soul: Encounters with Surgery, the Supernatural and the Healing Power of Hope. Focusing on his intellectual and spiritual odyssey, Dr. Hamilton offers insights into the craft of surgery and discusses how his patients have broadened his understanding of the human condition, the resilience of the human spirit, the healing process, and the world beyond science. (58 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
07/07/2007
Conversations with History: Biblical Insights into the Problem of Suffering
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes biblical scholar Bart Ehrman for a discussion of his intellectual odyssey with a focus on how the Bible explains the problem of human suffering. The conversation includes a discussion of the challenges of biblical interpretation when confronting this age old problem of the human condition. Included are topics such as the contribution of the prophets, a comparison of the old and new testaments, the book of Job, and the emergence of apocalyptic writers. (57 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
07/28/2007
Conversations with History: Ethics and Foreign Policy, with Father J. Bryan Hehir
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Father J. Brian Hehir for a discussion of the role of religion in framing ethical issues in a nuclear age. (56 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
04/03/1991
Conversations with History: Freedom of Expression, Tolerance, and Human Rights with T.M. Scanlon
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Harvard philosophy professor T.M. Scanlon for a discussion of freedom of expression, tolerance, and human rights. (53 minutes)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
08/13/2007
Conversations with History: On the Trail of our Human Ancestors, with Tim D. White
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Tim White, Professor of Integrative Biology at UC Berkeley, joins host Harry Kreisler for a discussion of how science is changing our understanding of mankind's origins. (53 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Biology
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
04/06/2008
Conversations with History: Philosophy and the Habits of Critical Thinking, with John R. Searle
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Conversations with History and Host Harry Kreisler welcome UC Berkeley Professor of Philosophy John R. Searle who talks about the work of a philosopher, critical thinking, and lessons of the Free Speech Movement. (58 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
U.S. History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
09/23/2003
Conversations with History: Women's Rights, Religious Freedom, and Liberal Education, with Martha C. Nussbaum
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Conversations Host Harry Kreisler welcomes philosopher Martha Nussbaum for a discussion of women and human development, religious freedom, and liberal education. (55 min)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
UCTV Teacher's Pet
Date Added:
11/07/2010
Course: Open for Insight
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CC BY-SA
Rating
5.0 stars

This is an online course in experimentation as a method of the empirical social sciences, directed at science newcomers and undergrads. We cover topics such as:
- How do we know what’s true?
- How can one recognize false conclusions?
- What is an experiment?
- What are experiments good for, and what can we learn from them?
- What makes a good experiment and how can I make a good experiment?

The aim of the course is to illustrate the principles of experimental insight. We also discuss why experiments are the gold standard in empirical social sciences and how a basic understanding of experimentation can also help us deal with questions in everyday life.

But it is not only exciting research questions and clever experimental set-ups that are needed for experiments to really work well. Experiments and the knowledge gained from them should be as freely accessible and transparent as possible, regardless of the context. Only then can other thinkers and experimenters check whether the results can be reproduced. And only then can other thinkers and experimenters build their own experiments on reliable original work. This is why the online course Open for Insight also discusses how experiments and the findings derived can be developed and communicated openly and transparently.

Subject:
Philosophy
Psychology
Sociology
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Tilburg University
Author:
Rima-Maria Rahal
Date Added:
08/25/2020
Critical Reasoning for Beginners
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Are you confident you can reason clearly? Are you able to convince others of your point of view? Are you able to give plausible reasons for believing what you believe? Do you sometimes read arguments in the newspapers, hear them on the television, or in the pub and wish you knew how to confidently evaluate them? In this six-part course, you will learn all about arguments, how to identify them, how to evaluate them, and how not to mistake bad arguments for good. Such skills are invaluable if you are concerned about the truth of your beliefs, and the cogency of your arguments.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Marianne Talbot
Date Added:
01/29/2010
Critical Thinking
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
5.0 stars

Critical thinking is the ability to think clearly and rationally about what to do or what to believe. It includes the ability to engage in reflective and independent thinking. Someone with critical thinking skills is able to do the following:

Understand the logical connections between ideas.
Identify, construct, and evaluate arguments.
Detect inconsistencies and common mistakes in reasoning.
Solve problems systematically.
Identify the relevance and importance of ideas.
Reflect on the justification of one’s own beliefs and values.
Critical thinking is not simply a matter of accumulating information. A person with a good memory and who knows a lot of facts is not necessarily good at critical thinking. Critical thinkers are able to deduce consequences from what they know, make use of information to solve problems, and to seek relevant sources of information to inform themselves.

Critical thinking should not be confused with being argumentative or being critical of other people. Although critical thinking skills can be used in exposing fallacies and bad reasoning, critical thinking can also play an important role in cooperative reasoning and constructive tasks. Critical thinking can help us acquire knowledge, improve our theories, and strengthen arguments. We can also use critical thinking to enhance work processes and improve social institutions.

Some people believe that critical thinking hinders creativity because critical thinking requires following the rules of logic and rationality, whereas creativity might require breaking those rules. This is a misconception. Critical thinking is quite compatible with thinking “out-of-the-box,” challenging consensus views, and pursuing less popular approaches. If anything, critical thinking is an essential part of creativity because we need critical thinking to evaluate and improve our creative ideas.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Oklahoma State University
Author:
Brian Kim
Date Added:
06/04/2020
Critical Thinking: Analysis and Evaluation of Argument
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

It is our hope that the successful student who completes a class using all or some of this text will have improved skills with application inside the discipline of philosophy, but also with application to work in other disciplines within academia. Our ultimate goal, however, is to help people develop techniques which support curiosity, open-mindedness, and an ability to collaborate successfully with others, across differences of experiences and background. Our dream is to help people “put their heads together.”

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Portland Community College
Author:
Hannah Love
Martha Bailey
Martin Wittenberg
Shirlee Geiger
Date Added:
06/23/2017
Critical Thinking Infographics
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CC BY-SA
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0.0 stars

 This is a collection of Infographics to help visual students understand the differences between the terms presented in an Introduction to Critical Thinking course. 

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Diagram/Illustration
Author:
Jennifer Smith
Date Added:
01/28/2021
Cybersecurity-Fake News
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

The goals of this activity are to facilitate team work, critical thinking, and presentation skills in the area of cybersecurity and fake news. Students will be grouped into two teams. As a team, they will choose and analyze cases and ethical questions about fake news through the questions presented in the activity. They will present their analysis to the class.

Subject:
Philosophy
Criminal Justice
Law
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Hostos Community College
Author:
Amy J Ramson
Date Added:
07/04/2020
Cybersecurity-The Internet of Things
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CC BY-NC-SA
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0.0 stars

With 38.5 billion smart devices in existence in 2020 and increasing every year, the potential for security breaches in the Internet of things is also escalating at a dramatic pace. The goal of this team activity is to facilitate team work, critical thinking, and presentation skills in the area of cybersecurity and the Internet of Things. Students will be grouped into two teams. As a team, they will analyze cases about security cameras and smart dolls through the questions presented in the activity. They will present their analysis to the class.

Subject:
Philosophy
Criminal Justice
Law
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Provider:
CUNY Academic Works
Provider Set:
Hostos Community College
Author:
Amy J Ramson
Date Added:
07/04/2020
Death
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
3.0 stars

There is one thing I can be sure of: I am going to die. But what am I to make of that fact? This course will examine a number of issues that arise once we begin to reflect on our mortality. The possibility that death may not actually be the end is considered. Are we, in some sense, immortal? Would immortality be desirable? Also a clearer notion of what it is to die is examined. What does it mean to say that a person has died? What kind of fact is that? And, finally, different attitudes to death are evaluated. Is death an evil? How? Why? Is suicide morally permissible? Is it rational? How should the knowledge that I am going to die affect the way I live my life?

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Shelly Kagan
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Deliberative Rhetoric: Arguing about Doing
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CC BY-NC-ND
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0.0 stars

Christian Kock’s essays show the essential interconnectedness of practical reasoning, rhetoric and deliberative democracy. They constitute a unique contribution to argumentation theory that draws on – and criticizes – the work of philosophers, rhetoricians, political scientists and other argumentation theorists. It puts rhetoric in the service of modern democracies by drawing attention to the obligations of politicians to articulate arguments and objections that citizens can weigh against each other in their deliberations about possible courses of action.

Subject:
Philosophy
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Primary Source
Textbook
Author:
Christian Kock
Date Added:
11/17/2017
Diving Into the Wreckage: Big Ideas in Baby Steps
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CC BY-NC-SA
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Pointing to inequities of the past that are unfathomable today, the Distinguished Professor at the University of Illinois College of Education invites us to consider what aspects of our current educational system our grandchildren will find unimaginable.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Big Ideas Fest / ISKME
Provider Set:
Big Ideas Fest
Author:
William Ayers
Date Added:
12/05/2011
The Drowning Child: A Philosophical Thought Experiment
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

Professor Matt Zwolinski of the explains philosopher Peter Singer's drowning child thought experiment and explains why its moral may not be as clear cut as it appears.

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Matt Zwolinski
Date Added:
09/12/2017
Dschang Paris Garoua
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CC BY-SA
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0.0 stars

Une malle s’ouvre. De précieux vestiges s’en échappent : photos impeccablement conservées par la douce vigilance d’une épouse, ouvrages jadis passionnément annotés, polycopiés aux signatures illustres, agendas nimbés de la patine du temps. Voilà le matériau à partir duquel l’autrice construit l’épistémologie particulière de cette si longue lettre par laquelle, portée par la fratrie, une fille parle à son père. Et voici lancée non pas une saga familiale, mais une anthropographie du quotidien de leurs vies. Réflexivité et catharsis.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
Science et Bien Commun
Author:
Léonie Tatou
Date Added:
05/02/2020
ETH 101: Ethics and Society
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CC BY-SA
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0.0 stars

This is a suggested course syllabus for a 100-level introductory ethics course. I have focused primarily on primary source readings when possible, and using secondary or summary readings to supplement students' understanding of the primary sources. The only exception to this general rule, however, is the readings for Immanuel Kant, as his writings are far more dense and technical, and can be very difficult for the average undergraduate to parse through. For this reason I have included only secondary and summary readings for Kant's ethics. The suggested syllabus is formatted on the assumption that the readings are primarily a springboard for class discussion, and for each week's selections I have included suggested discussion starters which correlate to that week's readings. As I continue to build on and modify this resource I plan to attach some of my Google Slides for each section, as well as editable Mid Term and Final materials, so feel free to contact me about those or simply check back.

The open resources that I drew from each have additional selections which I chose not include but may be of interest to others, particularly "Introduction to Ethics" from Lumen Learning which contains various chapters exploring specific ethical dilemmas. So I encourage anyone who finds my course helpful to explore these other resources to see what else you may want to include for your students. Below are the various open sources I relied on to create this course.

Lumen Learning, "Introduction to Ethics," CC Licensed Content, Original, License: CC BY: Attribution.

Dimmock, Mark, and Andrew Fisher. Ethics for A-Level. 1st ed., Open Book Publishers, 2017. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/j.ctt1wc7r6j.

Jeff McLaughlin, "The Originals: Classic Readings in Western Philosophy," CC Licensed Content, License: CC BY: Attribution.

https://www.earlymoderntexts.com, operated Jonathan Bennett.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
Middlesex Community College
Author:
Jonah Ford
Date Added:
04/26/2022
Eastern Philosophy Reader: An Open Educational Resource
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CC BY-NC-SA
Rating
0.0 stars

Excerpted primary texts from the East Asian philosophical traditions, including: Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Shinto, Confucianism, Taoism, Legalism, Sikhism, and historical Zoroastrianism.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Material Type:
Primary Source
Reading
Textbook
Author:
Noah Levin (collected and edited).
Date Added:
04/03/2020
Equality: Whether and Why It Matters
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This reading list examines the different perspectives of philosophers such as Robert Nozick, G.A. Cohen, and Derek Parfit on income equality and encourages students to consider whether and why equality matters.

Subject:
Philosophy
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Date Added:
10/31/2017
Equality as an Ideal
Rating
0.0 stars

Philosophers across many different ideologies argue that equality is an important human ideal. But what type of equality should we strive for? In this lecture, Professor Mark LeBar of Florida State University reviews four different kinds of equality and the obstacles in achieving them.

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Mark LeBar
Date Added:
09/14/2017
Ethics and Public Policy
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
4.0 stars

This course will provide the student with an overview of the role that ethical, cultural, religious, and moral principles play in public policy. The course will introduce the student to common themes found in the foundational theories of ethics and morality in politics such as justice, equality, fairness, individual liberty, free enterprise, charity, fundamental human rights, and minimizing harm to others. These themes are integrated into various decision-making models that you will learn about. Students will examine five types of decision frameworks used to make and implement public policy, as well as rationales used to justify inequitable impact and outcomes of policies. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: explain how personal morality and ethics impact the policymaking process; discuss various ethical frameworks used to resolve policy dilemmas; identify statutes, ethical codes, and legal opinions that define the normative parameters of key domestic and international policy issues; assess the impact that public interest groups have on policymaking and execution of policies. (Political Science 401)

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Ethics in Law Enforcement
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
4.0 stars

In this book, you will examine the moral and ethical issues that exist within law enforcement. This book will also familiarize you with the basic history, principles, and theories of ethics.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
BCcampus
Author:
Rick Parent
Steve McCartney
Date Added:
06/01/2020
Existentialism
Unrestricted Use
CC BY
Rating
0.0 stars

This course will examine the main focus that unites existentialists, "existence." Particularly, it will examine the concrete existence of individual human beings. Major figures or study will be, Blaise Pascal, Sóren Kierkegaard, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Albert Camus.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
08/28/2013
Feminism 101 introductory lectures
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CC BY-NC
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0.0 stars

I have produced a series of introductory undergraduate lectures on the subject of feminism and gender: the first introduces the concept of gender, the second tackles discussions around universalism and intersectionality, the third explores issues around reproduction, and the fourth applies an intersectional analysis to the topic of gender, power and violence. I have also produced a fifth which covers how to write an undergraduate essay.

The lectures take the form of Prezi presentations. They are free for academic colleagues and others to download, adapt and use as they see fit. They can be simply read out in class, expanding on points where appropriate, used as the basis for a more in-depth lectures by colleagues with expertise in the field, or clicked through and read by students in preparation for discussion sessions. The webpage includes links to transcripts of each lecture, for text readers.

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Sociology
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Lecture
Lesson
Author:
Alison Phipps
Date Added:
08/03/2020
Form and Content: An Introduction to Formal Logic
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Derek Turner, Professor of Philosophy, has written an introductory logic textbook that students at Connecticut College, or anywhere, can access for free. The book differs from other standard logic textbooks in its reliance on fun, low-stakes examples involving dinosaurs, a dog and his friends, etc.

This work is published in 2020 under a Creative Commons AttributionNonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. You may share this text in any format or medium. You may not use it for commercial purposes. If you share it, you must give appropriate credit. If you remix, transform, add to, or modify the text in any way, you may not then redistribute the modified text.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Derek Turner
Date Added:
02/04/2020
Foundations for Moral Relativism: Second Expanded Edition
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In this new edition of Foundations for Moral Relativism a distinguished moral philosopher tames a bugbear of current debate about cultural difference. J. David Velleman shows that different communities can indeed be subject to incompatible moralities, because their local mores are rationally binding. At the same time, he explains why the mores of different communities, even when incompatible, are still variations on the same moral themes. The book thus maps out a universe of many moral worlds without, as Velleman puts it, "moral black holes”. The six self-standing chapters discuss such diverse topics as online avatars and virtual worlds, lying in Russian and truth-telling in Quechua, the pleasure of solitude and the fear of absurdity. Accessibly written, this book presupposes no prior training in philosophy.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Open Book Publishers
Author:
J. David Velleman
Date Added:
07/24/2019
Foundations of American Education: A Critical Lens
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In this survey text, readers will explore the foundations of American education through a critical lens. Topics include the teaching profession, influences on student learning, philosophical and historical foundations, structures of schools, ethical and legal issues, curriculum, classroom environment, and the path forward.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
VIVA Open Publishing
Author:
1). Melissa Wells
2). Courtney Clayton
Date Added:
08/26/2021
Friedrich Hayek on Liberty
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Friedrich Hayek was undoubtedly one of the most important classical liberal thinkers in modern times. Throughout his career, he sought to illustrate the importance of liberty to human flourishing. This reading list provides students with an introduction to Hayek's work on liberty, from the knowledge problem to his famous book The Constitution of Liberty.

Subject:
Philosophy
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Syllabus
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Date Added:
10/31/2017
Fundamental Methods of Logic
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Fundamental Methods of Logic is suitable for a one-semester introduction to logic/critical reasoning course. It covers a variety of topics at an introductory level. Chapter One introduces basic notions, such as arguments and explanations, validity and soundness, deductive and inductive reasoning; it also covers basic analytical techniques, such as distinguishing premises from conclusions and diagramming arguments. Chapter Two discusses informal logical fallacies. Chapters Three and Four concern deductive logic, introducing the basics of Aristotelian and Sentential Logic, respectively. Chapter Five deals with analogical and causal reasoning, including a discussion of Mill's Methods. Chapter Six covers basic probability calculations, Bayesian inference, fundamental statistical concepts and techniques, and common statistical fallacies.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Author:
Matthew Knachel
Date Added:
09/08/2017
Gender Theory Syllabus
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This is a thirteen-week syllabus on different aspects of gender and feminist theory, for upper-undergraduate and postgraduate students. It contains key and suggested readings and suggested preparation tasks and seminar activities.

Subject:
Philosophy
Sociology
Women's Studies
Material Type:
Full Course
Lesson Plan
Syllabus
Author:
Alison Phipps
Date Added:
03/05/2021
General Philosophy Lectures
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A series of lectures delivered by Peter Millican to first-year philosophy students at the University of Oxford. The lectures comprise of the 8-week General Philosophy course, delivered to first year undergraduates. These lectures aim to provide a thorough introduction to many philosophical topics and to get students and others interested in thinking about key areas of philosophy. Taking a chronological view of the history of philosophy, each lecture is split into 3 or 4 sections which outline a particular philosophical problem and how different philosophers have attempted to resolve the issue. Individuals interested in the 'big' questions about life such as how we perceive the world, who we are in the world and whether we are free to act will find this series informative, comprehensive and accessible.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Provider:
University of Oxford
Provider Set:
University of Oxford Podcasts
Author:
Peter Millican
Date Added:
02/19/2010
Getting to Know Yourself - Values (Grades 7-12)
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This lesson plan was created by Jennifer Pritchett as part of the 2020 Nebraska CTE-Beginning Teachers Institute. The attached lesson plan is designed for students in grades 7-12 as a introduction to a service learning project.  This lesson plan can also be used in classes such as Sociology, Introduction to Education, Ethics, Leadership, etc. Students will learn the meanings of values and rank their top 5 values in a hands on or virtual format.  The culminating project is collaboration on a Google Slides presentation with the rest of the class.

Subject:
Philosophy
World Cultures
Career and Technical Education
Education
Social Science
Anthropology
Cultural Geography
Ethnic Studies
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Lesson Plan
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Author:
Jennifer Pritchett
Date Added:
07/23/2020
Giants of the Scottish Enlightenment: Adam Smith
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Professor James Stacey Taylor of the College of New Jersey discusses the contributions of philosopher and economist Adam Smith to the Scottish Enlightenment. Smith is best remembered as the father of modern economics, but he also made important contributions to philosophy in his book "The Theory of Moral Sentiments".

Subject:
Philosophy
History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
James Stacey Taylor
Date Added:
09/14/2017
Giants of the Scottish Enlightenment: David Hume
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Professor James Stacey Taylor of the College of New Jersey discusses the contributions of philosopher, historian, and economist David Hume to the Scottish Enlightenment, with a particular focus on sentimentalist philosophy.

Subject:
Philosophy
History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
James Stacey Taylor
Date Added:
09/14/2017
Giants of the Scottish Enlightenment: Francis Hutcheson
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Professor James Stacey Taylor of the College of New Jersey discusses the contributions of philosopher Francis Hutcheson to the Scottish Enlightenment, especially his contributions to the sentimentalist approach to morality.

Subject:
Philosophy
History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
James Stacey Taylor
Date Added:
09/14/2017
Good Cop Bad Cop
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What makes a good Cop? What makes a bad Cop?Explore words and values that you think are meaningful to describe a good Cop and a bad Cop.Español¿Qué hace a un buen policía? ¿Qué hace que un policía sea malo?Explore palabras y valores que considere significativos para describir un buen policía y un mal policía.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Public Relations
Criminal Justice
Law
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Ryan Maguire
Date Added:
06/25/2020
A Guide to Good Reasoning: Cultivating Intellectual Virtues - Second edition, revised and updated
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A Guide to Good Reasoning has been described by reviewers as “far superior to any other critical reasoning text.” It shows with both wit and philosophical care how students can become good at everyday reasoning. It starts with attitude—with alertness to judgmental heuristics and with the cultivation of intellectual virtues. From there it develops a system for skillfully clarifying and evaluating arguments, according to four standards—whether the premises fit the world, whether the conclusion fits the premises, whether the argument fits the conversation, and whether it is possible to tell.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Author:
David Carl Wilson
Date Added:
10/11/2021
Hi my name is Artificial Intelligence (English & Spanish)
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How does Artificial Intelligence impact Diversity?Explore what Artificial Intelligence in your own words and pictures.Español¿Cómo impacta la inteligencia artificial en la diversidad?Explore qué Inteligencia Artificial en sus propias palabras e imágenes.

Subject:
Computer Science
Engineering
Environmental Science
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Graphic Arts
Languages
Philosophy
Religious Studies
Visual Arts
Communication
Career and Technical Education
Electronic Technology
Educational Technology
Law
Genetics
Mathematics
Physical Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Author:
Ryan Maguire
Date Added:
06/25/2020
The History of Classical Liberalism
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Today people often believe that classical liberalism is all about free market economics, but according to Dr. Stephen Davies of the Institute of Economic Affairs, this definition misses the mark. In this lecture, Dr. Davies explains three key insights from classical liberalism and how the ideology has influenced how we approach subjects like history, economics, and even psychology.

Subject:
Philosophy
History
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Stephen Davies
Date Added:
09/14/2017
How Many Universes are There?
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The fact that no one knows the answer to this question is what makes it exciting. The story of physics has been one of an ever-expanding understanding of the sheer scale of reality, to the point where physicists are now postulating that there may be far more universes than just our own. Chris Anderson explores the thrilling implications of this idea. A quiz, thought provoking question, and links for further study are provided to create a lesson around the 5-minute video. Educators may use the platform to easily "Flip" or create their own lesson for use with their students of any age or level.

Subject:
Philosophy
Astronomy
Physics
Material Type:
Lecture
Provider:
TED
Provider Set:
TED-Ed
Author:
Andrew Park
Chris Anderson
Date Added:
03/11/2012
The Human Experience: From Human Being to Human Doing
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This multimedia reader examines how people use a humanities lens to make sense of what they experience, as well as share their experiences with the rest of the world. The information is presented using a pedagogical approach called reverse teaching, which introduces artifacts in their historical, social, political, personal, and other contexts. Along with the narrative, questions for creative and critical thinking prompt the reader to practice self-exploration.

Subject:
Philosophy
Film and Music Production
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Open Salt Lake Community College
Author:
Anita Y. Tsuchiya
Claire Adams
Date Added:
08/18/2020
I Bacini Culturali e la progettazione sociale orientata all’Heritage-Making, tra Politiche giovanili, Innovazione sociale, Diversità culturale
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Il volume rappresenta la tappa finale della prima stagione di implementazione del Progetto ABACUS (giugno 2019 - settembre 2020), sostenuta dal finanziamento pubblico garantito dalla Regione Siciliana e dalla Presidenza del Consiglio dei Ministri. In tal senso, la pubblicazione raccoglie sia una sezione di materiali di discussione critica sul percorso progettuale e sui primi esiti maturati, sia una ricca parte di contributi tematici offerti da referenti istituzionali, studiosi ed esperti, docenti accademici e ricercatori, professionisti e rappresentanti di organismi del Terzo settore Sono state così affrontate ed esaminate differenti tematiche e problematiche socio-culturali e socio-economiche, e prospettive e approcci metodologico-operativi tra loro affini e convergenti, che si sviluppano a cavallo delle politiche sociali, giovanili e culturali, della progettazione sociale e culturale, dell'innovazione sociale e della diversità culturale, in differenti contesti socio-territoriali siciliani e italiani, con una particolare attenzione per quelle iniziative che rappresentano casi paradigmatici in cui le istanze istituzionali, della ricerca, dell'educazione e della formazione si incontrano con le aspettative dei pubblici differenziati e, specialmente, delle giovani generazioni, anche sull'orizzonte della innovazione dell'occupazione giovanile.

Subject:
Architecture and Design
Computer Science
Information Science
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Graphic Arts
Languages
Performing Arts
Philosophy
Visual Arts
World Cultures
Communication
Management
Marketing
Public Relations
Career and Technical Education
Culinary Arts
Environmental Studies
Education
Educational Technology
Higher Education
Special Education
History
Law
Ecology
Measurement and Data
Hydrology
Social Science
Anthropology
Archaeology
Cultural Geography
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Assessment
Case Study
Diagram/Illustration
Primary Source
Teaching/Learning Strategy
Textbook
Author:
Alessandra Caravale
Alessia Bono
Andrea De Tommasi
Andrea Messina
Angela Vitale
Antonija Netolicki
Antonio Grasso
Antonio Sutera
Carlo Volpe
Caterina Mulè
Claudio La Rocca
Daniele Tulone
Davide Silvestri
Eleonora Giovene di Girasole
Elisabetta Di Stefano
Erika Coco
Fabio Pagano
Federica Lamonaca
Filippo Gravagno
Francesca Piazza
Francesca Rita Cerami
Francesco Iacono Quarantino
Gabriela Del Rosario Abate
Gabriella Paolini
Giorgia Leoni
Giovanna Sedita
Giuseppe Bivona
Giusi Carioto
Giusy Pappalardo
Ilaria Vitellio
Lucia Piastra
Luisella Pavan-Woolfe
Maria Chiara Falcone
Maria Laura Scaduto
Massimo Clemente
Matteo Tedo Fici
Mirella Serlorenzi
Riccardo Pozzo
Rossella Mancini
Sabrina Tomassini
Salvatore Aurelio Bruno
Stefania Picciola
Stefan Luca Mangione
Susanna Gristina
Tiziana Bonsignore
Ugo Arioti
Vanessa Mantia
Vania Virgili
Vilislava Metodieva
Yoanna Yordanova
Date Added:
04/01/2021
Immanuel Kant
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Born in Königsberg, East Prussia, Immanuel Kant (April 22, 1724 – February 12, 1804) was a German philosopher and scientist (astrophysics, mathematics, geography, anthropology) from East Prussia. Quite generally regarded as one of history’s truly great thinkers, Immanuel Kant is known for the historical synthesis of his transcendental method. His philosophy brought together the two major currents competing at the time of the Enlightenment, the metaphysical approach and the empirical approach. Through his “Copernican revolution,” Kant moved the criterion of truth from assertions about an external reality to the immediacy of the knowing self. His contribution practically put an end to philosophical speculation as it had been practiced for centuries, it established a firm basis for factual knowledge (in particular the scientific method), but it also opened the way to agnosticism on ultimate issues. For better or for worse, his legacy has never been entirely transcended to this day.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
New World Encyclopedia
Date Added:
08/04/2017
Inferring and Explaining
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Inferring and Explaining is a book in practical epistemology. It examines the notion of evidence and assumes that good evidence is the essence of rational thinking. Evidence is the cornerstone of the natural, social, and behavioral sciences. But it is equally central to almost all academic pursuits and, perhaps most importantly, to the basic need to live an intelligent and reflective life.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Portland State University
Provider Set:
PDXOpen
Author:
Jeffery L. Johnson
Date Added:
06/28/2019
Inquiry: A New Paradigm for Critical Thinking
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This volume reflects the development and theoretical foundation of a new paradigm for critical thinking based on inquiry. The field of critical thinking, as manifested in the Informal Logic movement, developed primarily as a response to the inadequacies of formalism to represent actual argumentative practice and to provide useful argumentative skills to students. Because of this, the primary focus of the field has been on informal arguments rather than formal reasoning. Yet the formalist history of the field is still evident in its emphasis, with respect to both theory and pedagogy, on the structure and evaluation of individual, de-contextualized arguments. It is our view that such a view of critical thinking is excessively narrow and limited, failing to provide an understanding of argumentation as largely a matter of comparative evaluation of a variety of contending positions and arguments with the goal of reaching a reasoned judgment on an issue. As a consequence, traditional critical thinking instruction is problematic in failing to provide the reasoning skills that students need in order to accomplish this goal. Instead, the goal of critical thinking instruction has been seen largely as a defensive one: of learning to not fall prey to invalid, inadequate, or fallacious arguments.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
eCampusOntario
Author:
Mark Battersby
Sharon Bailin
Date Added:
07/10/2020
The Intelligent Troglodyte's Guide to Plato's Republic
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The Republic of Plato is one of the classic gateway texts into the study and practice of philosophy, and it is just the sort of book that has been able to arrest and redirect lives. How it has been able to do this, and whether or not it will be able to do this in your own case, is something you can only discover for yourself. The present guidebook aims to help a person get fairly deep, fairly quickly, into the project. It divides the dialogue into 96 sections and provides commentary on each section as well as questions for reflection and exploration. It is organized with a table of contents and is stitched together with a system of navigating bookmarks. Links to external sites such as the Perseus Classical Library are used throughout. This book is suitable for college courses or independent study.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Reading
Student Guide
Textbook
Provider:
Fort Hays State University
Provider Set:
FHSU Scholars Repository
Author:
Douglas Drabkin
Date Added:
01/01/2016
Introducing Consciousness
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What is consciousness? How does the brain generate consciousness and how can a science of the mind describe and explain it adequately? This unit will introduce you to the slippery phenomenon that is consciousness, as well as some of the difficulties consciousness presents to science and philosophy.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Introducing Philosophy
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3.0 stars

Ever wondered what it would be like to study philosophy? This unit will introduce you to the teaching methods employed and the types of activities and assignments you would be asked to undertake should you wish to study OU course A211 Philosophy and the human situation.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Philosophy
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Open University
Provider Set:
Open University OpenLearn
Date Added:
09/06/2007
Introduction to Ethics
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This textbook is an introduction to Ethics. It covers the origins of ethics, ethical judgment, decision making, mistakes in reasoning, rethical theories, and contemporary ethical issues.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Achieving the Dream
Author:
El Paso Community College
Manuela A. Gomez
Date Added:
05/14/2021
An Introduction to Formal Logic
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forall x is an introduction to sentential logic and first-order predicate logic with identity, logical systems that significantly influenced twentieth-century analytic philosophy. After working through the material in this book, a student should be able to understand most quantified expressions that arise in their philosophical reading.

This books treats symbolization, formal semantics, and proof theory for each language. The discussion of formal semantics is more direct than in many introductory texts. Although forall x does not contain proofs of soundness and completeness, it lays the groundwork for understanding why these are things that need to be proven.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
forall x
Author:
P.D. Magnus
Date Added:
01/01/2012
Introduction to History and Philosophy of Science
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Philosophy of science asks questions that attempt to clarify exactly what science is, how it is different from other human endeavours, and how it works. We will take the opportunity to engage with the following pivotal questions of the philosophy of science in the first half of this textbook, all the while drawing from the rich history of science

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
eCampusOntario
Author:
Gregory Rupik
Hakob Barseghyan
Nicholas Overgaard
Date Added:
06/23/2021
An Introduction to Logic: From Everyday Life to Formal Systems
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An introduction to the discipline of logic covering subjects from the structures of arguments, classical and modern logic, categorical and inductive inferences, to informal fallacies.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Smith College
Author:
Albert Mosley
Eulalio Baltazar
Date Added:
03/25/2020
Introduction to Logic and Critical Thinking
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This is an introductory textbook in logic and critical thinking. The goal of the textbook is to provide the reader with a set of tools and skills that will enable them to identify and evaluate arguments. The book is intended for an introductory course that covers both formal and informal logic. As such, it is not a formal logic textbook, but is closer to what one would find marketed as a critical thinking textbook. Downloadable as a pdf file.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Lansing Community College
Author:
Matthew J. Van Cleave
Date Added:
01/04/2016
Introduction to Media Literacy (Ages 14-19)
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As an introduction to Media Literacy, this lesson covers topics ranging from rhetorical theory, philosophy, and history to illuminate the interconnected complications of media in the modern world. Supplemental resources are woven into the lesson in the form of hyperlink text, images, and embedded videos. The ultimate goal of this lesson resource is to inform grade-aged learners about the subject complexity of media literacy and equip them with the most basic tools to properly understand and engage with social media and media in general. Crash Course, a free supplemental learning company is a commonly referenced external tool within the lesson as their expanding topic verity offers well-researched additive content for digital learning environments.

Subject:
Philosophy
English Language Arts
Composition and Rhetoric
Material Type:
Lesson
Module
Author:
Eren Rapp
Date Added:
12/05/2021
Introduction to Philosophy
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CC BY
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This textbook is an introduction to Philosophy. It covers the nature of philosophy, logic, ethics, metaphysics and epistemology, and the philosophy of religion.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Achieving the Dream
Author:
Gabriel Camacho
Date Added:
05/14/2021
An Introduction to Philosophy
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The goal of this text is to present philosophy to newcomers as a living discipline with historical roots. While a few early chapters are historically organized, my goal in the historical chapters is to trace a developmental progression of thought that introduces basic philosophical methods and frames issues that remain relevant today. Later chapters are topically organized. These include philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, areas where philosophy has shown dramatic recent progress. This text concludes with four chapters on ethics, broadly construed. I cover traditional theories of right action in the third of these. Students are first invited first to think about what is good for themselves and their relationships in a chapter of love and happiness. Next a few meta-ethical issues are considered; namely, whether they are moral truths and if so what makes them so. The end of the ethics sequence addresses social justice, what it is for one’s community to be good. Our sphere of concern expands progressively through these chapters. Our inquiry recapitulates the course of development into moral maturity

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Bellevue College
Author:
W. Russ Payne
Date Added:
08/29/2018
An Introduction to Philosophy
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0.0 stars

The goal of this text is to present philosophy to newcomers as a living discipline with historical roots. While a few early chapters are historically organized, the goal in the historical chapters is to trace a developmental progression of thought that introduces basic philosophical methods and frames issues that remain relevant today. Later chapters are topically organized. These include philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, areas where philosophy has shown dramatic recent progress. This text concludes with four chapters on ethics, broadly construed. Traditional theories of right action is covered in a third of these. Students are first invited first to think about what is good for themselves and their relationships in a chapter of love and happiness. Next a few meta-ethical issues are considered; namely, whether they are moral truths and if so what makes them so. The end of the ethics sequence addresses social justice, what it is for one's community to be good. Our sphere of concern expands progressively through these chapters. Our inquiry recapitulates the course of development into moral maturity. Over the course of the text, the author has tried to outline the continuity of thought that leads from the historical roots of philosophy to a few of the diverse areas of inquiry that continue to make significant contributions to our understanding of ourselves and the world we live in.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Bellevue College
Author:
W. Russ Payne
Date Added:
07/10/2019
Introduction to Philosophy: Aesthetic Theory and Practice
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Aesthetic Theory and Practice offers fresh perspectives on canonical and emerging topics in aesthetics, and also brings attention to a number of culturally sensitive topics that are customarily silenced in introductions to philosophical aesthetics. The papers are heterogeneous in terms of length and degrees of difficulty, inviting the reader into the study of contemporary aesthetics, which spans a lifetime.

This collection is co-created thanks to contributions from the Americas, Japan and China, Australia and Austria, England and France, Italy, Germany and Ethiopia. It is not surprising, therefore, that all eleven chapters adopt active critical and often multicultural perspectives, so as to evaluate aesthetics in relation to the tradition, its cultural potential, and the messy, geopolitical circumstances of the 21st century.

If you are adopting or adapting this book for a course, please let us know on our adoption form for the Introduction to Philosophy open textbook series: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdwf2E7bRGvWefjhNZ07kgpgnNFxVxxp-iidPE5gfDBQNGBGg/viewform?usp=sf_link.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Alexander Westenberg
Andrew Broadey
Christina Hendricks (Series Editor)
Elizabeth Burns Coleman
Elizabeth Scarbrough
Ines Kleesattel
Matteo Ravasio
Matthew Sharpe
Pierre Fasula
Richard Hudson-Miles
Ruth Sonderegger
Valery Vino (Book Editor)
Xiao Ouyang
Yuriko Saito
Date Added:
01/10/2022
Introduction to Philosophy: Epistemology
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Introduction to Philosophy: Epistemology engages first-time philosophy readers on a guided tour through the core concepts, questions, methods, arguments, and theories of epistemology—the branch of philosophy devoted to the study of knowledge. After a brief overview of the field, the book progresses systematically while placing central ideas and thinkers in historical and contemporary context.

The chapters cover the analysis of knowledge, the nature of epistemic justification, rationalism vs. empiricism, skepticism, the value of knowledge, the ethics of belief, Bayesian epistemology, social epistemology, and feminist epistemologies. Along the way, instructors and students will encounter a wealth of additional resources and tools:
Chapter learning outcomes
Key terms
Images of philosophers and related art
Useful diagrams and tables
Boxes containing excerpts and other supplementary material
Questions for reflection
Suggestions for further reading
A glossary

For an undergraduate survey epistemology course, Introduction to Philosophy: Epistemology is ideal when used as a main text paired with primary sources and scholarly articles. For an introductory philosophy course, select book chapters are best used in combination with chapters from other books in the Introduction to Philosophy series.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Brian C. Barnett
Daniel Massey
Guy Axtell
Jonathan Lopez
K. S. Sangeetha
Monica C. Poole
Todd R. Long
William D. Rowley
Date Added:
12/08/2021
Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics
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We often make judgments about good and bad, right and wrong. Philosophical ethics is the critical examination of these and other concepts central to how we evaluate our own and each others’ behavior and choices.

This text examines some of the main threads of discussion on these topics that have developed over the last couple of millenia, mostly within the Western cultural tradition. It considers basic questions about moral and ethical judgment: Is there such a thing as something that is really right or really wrong independent of time, place and perspective? What is the relationship between religion and ethics? How can we reconcile self-interest and ethics? Is it ever acceptable to harm one person in order to help others? What do recent discussions in evolutionary biology or have to say about human moral systems? What is the relation between gender and ethics? The authors invite you to participate in their exploration of these and many other questions in philosophical ethics.

If you are adopting or adapting this book for a course, please let us know on our adoption form for the Introduction to Philosophy open textbook series: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdwf2E7bRGvWefjhNZ07kgpgnNFxVxxp-iidPE5gfDBQNGBGg/viewform?usp=sf_link.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Christina Hendricks (Series Editor)
Douglas Giles
Frank Aragbonfoh Abumere
George Matthews (Book Editor)
Jeffrey Morgan
Joseph Kranak
Kathryn MacKay
Michael Klenk
Paul Rezkalla
Ya-Yun (Sherry) Kao
Date Added:
12/18/2019
Introduction to Philosophy: Logic
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Introduction to Philosophy: Logic provides students with the concepts and skills necessary to identify and evaluate arguments effectively. The chapters, all written by experts in the field, provide an overview of what arguments are, the different types of arguments one can expect to encounter in both philosophy and everyday life, and how to recognise common argumentative mistakes.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Ben Martin
Christina Hendricks
Date Added:
11/18/2020
Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy of Mind
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Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy of Mind (edited by Heather Salazar) surveys the central themes in philosophy of mind and places them in a historical and contemporary context intended to engage first-time readers in the field. It focuses on debates about the status and character of the mind and its seemingly subjective nature in an apparently more objective world.

Written by experts and emerging researchers in their subject areas, each chapter brings clarity to complex material and involves the reader through a wealth of examples. Many chapters include applications of the concepts to film and literature that will stimulate readers to firmly grasp the significance of the philosophy of mind. Subjects covered are how the mind fits into the material world and how to analyze its properties. In that vein, substance dualism, materialism, behaviorism, functionalism, and property dualism are all explored.

In addition, it includes insightful contributions on how to explain seemingly subjective feelings, the mystery of consciousness, conceptual understanding of the world outside of the mind, and free will. The book is designed to be used alone or alongside a reader of historical and contemporary original sources.

If you are adopting or adapting this book for a course, please let us know on our adoption form for the Introduction to Philosophy open textbook series: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdwf2E7bRGvWefjhNZ07kgpgnNFxVxxp-iidPE5gfDBQNGBGg/viewform?usp=sf_link.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Christina Hendricks
Daniel Haas
Elly Vintiadis
Eran Asoulin
Heather Salazar
Henry Shevlin
Jason Newman
Paul Richard Blum
Tony Cheng
Date Added:
09/20/2019
Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy of Religion
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Introduction to Philosophy: Philosophy of Religion introduces some of the major traditional arguments for and against the existence of God, as well as some less well-known, but thought-provoking arguments for the existence of God, and one of the most important new challenges to religious belief from the Cognitive Science of Religion. An introductory chapter traces the connection between philosophy and religion throughout Western history, and a final chapter addresses the place of non-Western and non-monotheistic religions within contemporary philosophy of religion.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Provider:
Rebus Community
Author:
Beau Branson
Christina Hendricks
Date Added:
12/11/2020
Remix
An Introduction to Philosophy, Second Edition
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The goal of this text is to present philosophy to newcomers as a living discipline with historical roots. While a few early chapters are historically organized, the goal in the historical chapters is to trace a developmental progression of thought that introduces basic philosophical methods and frames issues that remain relevant today. Later chapters are topically organized. These include philosophy of science and philosophy of mind, areas where philosophy has shown dramatic recent progress. This text concludes with four chapters on ethics, broadly construed. Traditional theories of right action is covered in a third of these. Students are first invited first to think about what is good for themselves and their relationships in a chapter of love and happiness. Next a few meta-ethical issues are considered; namely, whether they are moral truths and if so what makes them so. The end of the ethics sequence addresses social justice, what it is for one’s community to be good. Our sphere of concern expands progressively through these chapters. Our inquiry recapitulates the course of development into moral maturity. Over the course of the text, the author has tried to outline the continuity of thought that leads from the historical roots of philosophy to a few of the diverse areas of inquiry that continue to make significant contributions to our understanding of ourselves and the world we live in.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Textbook
Author:
Marc Skuster
Date Added:
09/18/2020
Introduction to Philosophy resource - Reflection paper template for students
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These instructions are given to community college students who are reading primary texts in a philosophy 100 class. This is a version of the typical "impression paper" students are often asked to write to prove they have read the material in advance of class discussion. The main part that may be of interest, and why I'm sharing it, is the "template." This template gives students two things: first, an easy, three-step way to phrase their initial responses to readings; second, it gives permission to describe their reading circumstances and personalize their account of their reading experience. This seems to have value for the students, allowing them to write in a natural voice, express themselves, and reflect upon their own learning conditions. As a teacher, I've enjoyed reading responses from this template because I learn a little about my students lives at the same time as I learn about how they initially interpret a text.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Homework/Assignment
Author:
Cara O'Connor
Date Added:
03/21/2019
Introduction to Philosphy (PHIL 101)
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This is an introductory course to Philosophy, which is the study of general and fundamental problems such as those connected with existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, and language. Students will be introduced to the primary branches of Philosophy - ethics, logic, metaphysics, and epistemology. The course considers philosophers and works of Western Philosophy, including Plato, Hebrew scripture, Schopenhauer, Swedenborg, Buber, Kant, Hume, Locke and Berkeley.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture Notes
Lesson Plan
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
Provider Set:
Open Course Library
Date Added:
10/31/2011
Introduction to Political Philosophy
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This course is intended as an introduction to political philosophy as seen through an examination of some of the major texts and thinkers of the Western political tradition. Three broad themes that are central to understanding political life are focused upon: the polis experience (Plato, Aristotle), the sovereign state (Machiavelli, Hobbes), constitutional government (Locke), and democracy (Rousseau, Tocqueville). The way in which different political philosophies have given expression to various forms of political institutions and our ways of life are examined throughout the course.

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Syllabus
Provider:
Yale University
Provider Set:
Open Yale Courses
Author:
Steven B. Smith
Date Added:
02/16/2011
Introduction to Symbolic Logic
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CC BY-NC-SA
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This resource provides a basic introduction to what logic is, including a definition of an argument and how to distinguish between arguments and other forms of speech, such as explanations, as well as the distinction between inductive and deductive arguments.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Lecture Notes
Author:
Judith Cain
Date Added:
10/04/2020
Introduction to Western Political Thought
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Political thought, otherwise known as political theory or philosophy, is the study of questions concerning power, justice, rights, law, and other issues pertaining to governance. This course examines major texts in the history of political thought and asks how different views on human nature inform the design of government. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: summarize the passage of political thought through the classical, Renaissance, and Enlightenment periods and based on the works of Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and Marx; compare and contrast the differences between Plato and Aristotle with regard to their understandings of the nature of the person, ethics, society, citizenship, and governance; explain the historical and intellectual context in which the political thought that helped to develop the modern state came to be; compare and contrast the concepts of justice, freedom, equality, citizenship, and sovereignty in the works of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau; explain the different versions of, and importance of, 'the state of nature' to political thought; identify the influences of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau on the development of the United States Constitution; summarize the thoughts of Alexis de Tocqueville on the American political landscape, particularly with regard to religion and equality, and why this has importance beyond the American context; explain Karl Marx's world view, with particular regard to his critique of democracy and the modern, politically liberal, state; how it came to be; and its fundamental link to capitalism. (Political Science 201)

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Date Added:
11/21/2011
Is Mind Material?/Can Computers Think?
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The purpose behind this OER is to dive deeper into Chapter 7, Is Mind Material, from Nortons Introduction to Philosophy and Can Computers Think? by John Searle. This OER was created by a group of 4 students who attend The Universirty of Colorado Colorado Springs and contains our interpretations of the Chapter and the reading. There are discussion questions at the end designed to involve the learner and allow for further thinking and contributions to the material. We have also included an additional video at the end of our PowerPoint that can help explain this even more. We hope that our information can help you to understand these readings as well as think about them even more in depth. OER PowerPoint

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Interactive
Reading
Author:
Cierra Barnard
Date Added:
05/05/2022
Is There Too Much Inequality in America?: A Debate
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The question of income inequality has become a key issue in contemporary politics. What caused the distribution of wealth in America to become so lopsided in favor of the 1%? What are the best ways to even the playing field? How can society best help its poorest? Does inequality even matter? The Institute for Humane Studies asked two professors-- Professor Steve Horwitz, economist at St. Lawrence University, and Professor Jeffrey Reiman, philosopher at American University- to answer questions about wealth, fairness, inequality in the United States. This is their debate.

Subject:
Philosophy
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Lesson
Provider:
Institute for Humane Studies
Author:
Jeffrey Reiman
Steve Horwitz
Date Added:
10/31/2017
John Locke, Malcolm X, and Human Rights
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This instructor resource walks the student throught the connection between Locke's view of natural rights to the modern concept of human rights. It also has the student reflect on the strategy of the civil rights movement and Malcolm X's proposal that the fight should be framed as a human rights struggle.

Subject:
Philosophy
Political Science
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Homework/Assignment
Lesson
Author:
Bhawana Kamil
Date Added:
12/13/2021
John Rawls
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John Rawls (February 21, 1921 – November 24, 2002) was an American political philosopher, a long-time professor at Harvard University, and the author of several books, including A Theory of Justice and Political Liberalism. Rawls' most important and influential idea was the principle of "justice as fairness" as the basis for political liberalism. He refuted the predominant Utilitarian concepts of the time and took a much more idealistic approach to politics. Rawls' efforts, much of it inspired by the work of Immanuel Kant, led to a revival of the social contract theory, which had long been neglected by political philosophers. Rawls' theories of social justice and liberalism have become widely accepted among modern scholars, and he has become one of the key figures in shaping modern political thought.

Subject:
Philosophy
Material Type:
Reading
Provider:
New World Encyclopedia
Date Added:
08/04/2017