Keywords: Wound Healing (9)

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Analysis of Matrix-Dependent Cell Migration with a Barrier Migration Assay
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Analysis of Matrix-Dependent Cell Migration with a Barrier Migration Assay

Cell migration plays a pivotal role in many biological processes and is ... (more)

Cell migration plays a pivotal role in many biological processes and is modulated by cytokines and growth factors. In vivo, cells are embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM proteins are linked to the cellular cytoskeleton by integrin adhesion receptors, which transmit extracellular signals into the cell, thereby affecting cell adhesion and migration as well as gene expression. We describe a cell migration assay that uses a barrier device to separate the cells. The assay enables quantification of the migration of adherent cells on defined matrix proteins and the ability to evaluate migration-associated characteristics of individual cells. Thus, the barrier cell migration assay is a useful tool for exploring matrix-dependent migration of adherent cells. (less)

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Life Science
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BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
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BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Margarete Goppelt-Struebe (University Hospital Erlangen;Department of Nephrology and Hypertension REV)
Sven Kroening (University Hospital Erlangen;Department of Nephrology and Hypertension REV)
Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions, Fall 2003
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Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions, Fall 2003

Principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical ... (more)

Principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. Mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Tissue and organ regeneration. Design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions. Comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to case studies. Criteria for restoration of physiological function for tissues and organs. (less)

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Science and Technology
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M.I.T.
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MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Spector, Myron
Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions, Fall 2009
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Biomaterials-Tissue Interactions, Fall 2009

"This course covers the principles of materials science and cell biology underlying ... (more)

"This course covers the principles of materials science and cell biology underlying the design of medical implants, artificial organs, and matrices for tissue engineering. Methods for biomaterials surface characterization and analysis of protein adsorption on biomaterials. Molecular and cellular interactions with biomaterials are analyzed in terms of unit cell processes, such as matrix synthesis, degradation, and contraction. Mechanisms underlying wound healing and tissue remodeling following implantation in various organs. Tissue and organ regeneration. Design of implants and prostheses based on control of biomaterials-tissue interactions. Comparative analysis of intact, biodegradable, and bioreplaceable implants by reference to case studies. Criteria for restoration of physiological function for tissues and organs." (less)

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Science and Technology
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M.I.T.
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MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Spector, Myron
Yannas, Ioannis
Double Duty for Rac1 in Epidermal Wound Healing
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Double Duty for Rac1 in Epidermal Wound Healing

During cutaneous wound healing, increased proliferation and migration of epidermal keratinocytes is ... (more)

During cutaneous wound healing, increased proliferation and migration of epidermal keratinocytes is essential for efficient re-epithelialization of the wound and restoration of barrier function to the skin. Although numerous cell culture studies have identified intracellular signaling proteins that control proliferation and migration in response to extracellular cues from the wound microenvironment, confirming their importance in wound healing requires appropriate in vivo models. The Rho-family guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rac1 is an effector of cellular responses to growth factors, cytokines, and adhesion proteins present in wounds, and it has long been suspected to be an important regulator of wound healing. Two different genetic models now confirm an essential role for Rac1 in wound healing and, further, identify a dual role for Rac1 in promoting keratinocyte migration and proliferation during wound re-epithelialization. This sets the stage for determining which of the known Rac1 pathways are critical for wound repair in vivo and for linking these pathways to specific integrin or growth factor receptors that mediate cellular responses to cues from the wound environment. Together with studies that implicate Rac1 in maintaining epidermal stem cell populations, these findings lay the foundation for identifying distinct epidermal compartments from which Rac1 controls different aspects of wound re-epithelialization. (less)

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Life Science
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BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
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BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
C. Michael DiPersio (Albany Medical College;Center for Cell Biology and Cancer Research REV)
Epithelial Barriers, Compartmentation, and Cancer
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Epithelial Barriers, Compartmentation, and Cancer

Epithelial cells, and the tight junctions between them, form a polarized barrier ... (more)

Epithelial cells, and the tight junctions between them, form a polarized barrier between luminal and serosal fluid compartments and segregate luminal growth factors from their basal-lateral receptors. Breakdown of this barrier should allow access of growth factors in the luminal fluid to their receptors on the basal-lateral cell membranes, as recently demonstrated for heregulin and erbB receptors in airway epithelia. It should also allow luminal growth factors to access the stroma. This property may have adaptive value for epithelial tissues in general, as an elegant response to injury, but may also promote cancer formation in premalignant epithelial tissues in which the tight junctions have become chronically leaky to growth factors. (less)

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Life Science
Physics
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Activities and Labs
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BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
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BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
J. M. Mullin (Lankenau Institute for Medical Research; REV)
Science Signaling Podcast: 23 February 2010
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Science Signaling Podcast: 23 February 2010

This is a conversation with Chuan-Yuan Li about a Research Article published ... (more)

This is a conversation with Chuan-Yuan Li about a Research Article published in the 23 February 2010 issue of Science Signaling. (less)

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Reference
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BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Annalisa M. VanHook (American Association for the Advancement of Science;Science Signaling REV)
Chuan-Yuan Li (Aurora;University of Colorado School of Medicine REV)
Sorting the Signals from the Signals in the Noisy Environment of Inflammation
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Sorting the Signals from the Signals in the Noisy Environment of Inflammation

Necrotic cells release dozens, possibly hundreds, of molecules that stimulate the inflammatory ... (more)

Necrotic cells release dozens, possibly hundreds, of molecules that stimulate the inflammatory response. Healthy cells in the environment react to these by secreting other inflammatory mediators to amplify the response. In response to acute necrotic injury in the liver, neutrophils follow a restricted set of molecular cues to move along the sinusoids through the inflamed tissue and into the zone of necrosis, as demonstrated by intravital microscopy to view leukocyte migration live and in real time. Necrosis initiates an intricate interplay between damage-associated molecular pattern molecules, stromal inflammatory cells, and neutrophils. This results in a series of clear molecular signals, enabling neutrophils to follow an intravascular chemokine gradient along the sinusoid in the region where blood still circulates and a formyl peptide gradient through the nonperfused region to the necrotic focus. (less)

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
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Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
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BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
William A. Muller (Chicago;Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine REV)
Syndecans Shed Their Reputation as Inert Molecules
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Syndecans Shed Their Reputation as Inert Molecules

The syndecan transmembrane proteoglycans synergize with receptors for extracellular matrix molecules and ... (more)

The syndecan transmembrane proteoglycans synergize with receptors for extracellular matrix molecules and growth factors to initiate cytoplasmic signals in response to a range of extracellular stimuli. Syndecans influence a wide range of physiological processes, but their contribution is most apparent during wound repair. Aspects of syndecan biology that have attracted research interest include extracellular matrix binding, outside-to-inside plasma membrane signal propagation, activation of cytoplasmic signals, and shedding of the syndecan extracellular domain, but the mechanisms by which syndecan cytoplasmic signals modulate extracellular function remain largely unresolved. Hayashida et al. have now discovered that association between an endocytic regulator, Rab5, and the syndecan-1 cytoplasmic domain controlled the shedding of the syndecan-1 extracellular domain. The work describes a mechanistic investigation into inside-to-outside syndecan signaling and highlights several gaps in our understanding of the relation between cell-surface receptors and proteases. In this Perspective, we summarize the current understanding of receptor interplay and identify the challenges that face investigators of adhesion- and growth factor–dependent signaling. (less)

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
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Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
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BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Mark D. Bass (University of Manchester;Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research REV)
Mark R. Morgan (University of Manchester;Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research REV)
Martin J. Humphries (University of Manchester;Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research REV)
Using Simple Organisms to Model Human Diseases, Spring 2013
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Using Simple Organisms to Model Human Diseases, Spring 2013

How do scientists discover the basic biology underlying human diseases? Simple organisms ... (more)

How do scientists discover the basic biology underlying human diseases? Simple organisms such as baker's yeast, nematodes, fruit flies, zebrafish, mice and rats have allowed biologists to investigate disease at multiple levels, from molecules to behavior. In this course students will learn strategies of disease modeling by critically reading and discussing primary research articles. We will explore current models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease, childhood genetic diseases such as Fragile X syndrome, as well as models of deafness and wound healing. Our goal will be to understand the strategies biologists use to build appropriate models of human disease and to appreciate both the power and limitations of using simple organisms to analyze human disease. This course is one of many Advanced Undergraduate Seminars offered by the Biology Department at MIT. These seminars are tailored for students with an interest in using primary research literature to discuss and learn about current biological research in a highly interactive setting. Many instructors of the Advanced Undergraduate Seminars are postdoctoral scientists with a strong interest in teaching. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
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Full Course
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Provider:
M.I.T.
Provider Set:
MIT OpenCourseWare
Author:
Katie Harris
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