Keywords: U.S. History (1438)

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.00001 The Value of A Unit With Four Cyphers Going Before It
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.00001 The Value of A Unit With Four Cyphers Going Before It

A satire on dissension and political intrigue within Andrew Jackson's administration, surrounding ... (more)

A satire on dissension and political intrigue within Andrew Jackson's administration, surrounding the Spring 1831 resignations of several members of his Cabinet. In the center Jackson sits in a collapsing chair, labeled "The Hickory Chair is coming to pieces at last." Seated on the arm of his chair is a rat with the head of Postmaster General William T. Barry. On the floor before him is a pile of resignations with a broken clay pipe, and a brazier. He sweeps with a broom at a number of rats scurrying at his feet, and in the act knocks over the "Altar of Reform" toppling a winged ass also holding a broom. The rats have heads of (from left to right) Secretary of State Martin Van Buren, Secretary of War John H.Eaton, "D. I. O."(?), Navy Secretary John Branch, and Treasury Secretary Samuel D. Ingham. John Calhoun is a terrier which menaces the Van Buren rat. Van Buren, threatened by an eagle while attempting to climb the "Ladder of Political Preferment" whose rungs are labeled with the names of the states, says, "If I could only humbug that Eagle and climb up this ladder." Calhoun: "You don't get up if I can help it." Eaton: "I'm off to the Indians." Branch: "This from the greatest and best of men." Ingham: "Is this the reward of my Patriotic disinterestedness." In a doorway marked "Skool of Reform" appears a man in a visored cap and fur-trimmed coat saying, "There's Clay, and this is all Clays doings." Daniel Webster and Henry Clay (with raised arms) look in through a window. Webster: "That Terrier has nullified the whole Concern." Clay: "Famine! War! Pestilence!"|Cock of the Walk fecit. (Edward Williams Clay).|Entered . . . 1831 by E.W. Clay.|Publd by E.W. Clay, S.E. corner of Walnut and 4th St. Philada.|The print appears to have been derived from William James Hubbard's portrait of Jackson, or from Albert Newsam's 1830 lithograph reproducing the painting. A pencil sketch believed by Davison to be Clay's sketch for the print is in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington. The Library's impression of ".0001" was deposited for copyright on May 5, 1831. Davison also lists a second edition of the print. Two anonymous versions of the print, possibly derived from ".00001," were published under the title "The Rats leaving a falling house." (See 1831-2).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Davison, no. 32 (sketch), 56 and 57.|Murrell, p. 109-110.|Weitenkampf, p. 24.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1831-1. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
1869: A Report on Schools in North Carolina
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1869: A Report on Schools in North Carolina

In this lesson, students use a guided reading to look at a ... (more)

In this lesson, students use a guided reading to look at a report on the status of education in North Carolina in 1869, and discuss the reasons given then for why the Governor and Legislature should support educating North Carolina's children. They are provided an opportunity to compare and contrast the 1869 document against their own ideas about the civic duty to attend school through age sixteen, and its relative value to the state and the country. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Lesson Plans
Provider:
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Education
Provider Set:
LEARN NC Lesson Plans
Author:
Victoria Schaefer
1897 Petition Against the Annexation of Hawaii
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1897 Petition Against the Annexation of Hawaii

This site recounts the struggle for control of Hawaii between native Hawaiians ... (more)

This site recounts the struggle for control of Hawaii between native Hawaiians and American business interests in the late 1800s. This 1897 petition and a lobbying effort by native Hawaiians convinced the U.S. Congress not to annex the islands. But months later the U.S.S. Maine exploded in Havana and the Spanish-American War began. The U.S. needed a mid-Pacific fueling station and naval base. Primary source images, standards correlation, and teaching activities are included in this resource. (less)

Subject:
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Lesson Plans
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
National Archives and Records Administration
1900 America: Primary Sources and Epic Poetry
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1900 America: Primary Sources and Epic Poetry

To better understand the United States at the end of the nineteenth ... (more)

To better understand the United States at the end of the nineteenth century, this interdisciplinary lesson integrates analyzing historical primary resources with literary analysis. Students work in groups and express themselves creatively through a multi-media epic poem. The artistic models for the students' multi-media epic poem are Walt Whitman's Song of Myself (1855) and Hart Crane's The Bridge (1930). These epic poets capture, interpret, and give meaning to their particular times and places. Students look to do the same with the year 1900, relying upon relevant primary resources -- sound recordings, images, text, and their own creative and interpretative voices. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
Material Type:
Lesson Plans
Readings
Unit of Study
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire
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1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire

The documents selected for this exhibit are primary sources that historians and ... (more)

The documents selected for this exhibit are primary sources that historians and other researchers study when they write about historical events. They are a selection from the files created or received by Federal agencies in or near San Francisco at the time of the disaster. They contain eyewitness testimony of the damage of the earthquake, the ensuing fires, and the desolation that was left in their wake. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Readings
Provider:
National Archives and Records Administration
Provider Set:
National Archives and Records Administration
1948: A Year of Decisions
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1948: A Year of Decisions

The 2008 Summer Teachers Conference focused on the year 1948. Lesson plans ... (more)

The 2008 Summer Teachers Conference focused on the year 1948. Lesson plans created by teachers attending the conference and powerpoint presentations delivered by speakers are presented on this site. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Lesson Plans
Teaching and Learning Strategies
Provider:
Truman Presidential Library and Museum
Provider Set:
National Archives and Records Administration
19th Century Women: Struggle and Triumph
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19th Century Women: Struggle and Triumph

Ever wonder what women were doing during the 1800s or what is ... (more)

Ever wonder what women were doing during the 1800s or what is known as the antebellum period of United States history? Men are well represented in our history books as they were the powerful, educated leaders of our country. Women, on the other hand, rarely had opportunities to tell their stories. Powerful stories of brave women who helped shape the history of the United States are revealed to students through journals, letters, narratives and other primary sources. Synthesizing information from the various sources, students write their impressions of women in the Northeast, Southeast, or the West during the Nineteenth Century. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Lesson Plans
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
LOC Teachers
37a. The Great Upheaval
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37a. The Great Upheaval

It started with a 10% pay cut. When leaders of the Baltimore ... (more)

It started with a 10% pay cut. When leaders of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company ordered this second reduction in less than eight months, railroad workers in Martinsburg, West Virginia decided they had had enough. On July 16, 1877, workers in that town drove all the engines into the roundhouse and boldly declared that no train would leave until the owners restored their pay. The local townspeople gathered at the railyard to show their support for the strikers. A great showdown was on. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Readings
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
37b. Labor vs. Management
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37b. Labor vs. Management

The battle lines were clearly drawn. People were either workers or bosses, ... (more)

The battle lines were clearly drawn. People were either workers or bosses, and with that strong identity often came an equally strong dislike for those who were on the other side. As the number of self-employed Americans dwindled in the Gilded Age, workers began to feel strength in their numbers and ask greater and greater demands of their bosses. When those demands were rejected, they plotted schemes to win their cases. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Readings
Provider:
Independence Hall Association
Provider Set:
US History
5 To One Ha
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5 To One Ha

Another show of Northern optimism in the early months of the Lincoln ... (more)

Another show of Northern optimism in the early months of the Lincoln administration. Uncle Sam approaches from the left holding a bayonet, causing five Southern soldiers to flee in panic to the right. In their haste to retreat the Confederates drop their flag, muskets, a hat, and a boot. A black child and two black men, one fiddling, watch with obvious glee from the background. Prominent in the center foreground are a mound marked "76" bearing an American flag and a crowing cock. In the background are the Capitol at Washington (left) and the palmetto trees of South Carolina (right).|Entered . . . by W. Wiswell . . . Ohio, June 8th 1861.|The Library's copy of the print is the copyright deposit impression.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 132.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1861-28. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
6 Cents. Humbug Glory Bank
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6 Cents. Humbug Glory Bank

Another mock bank note parodying the "shinplasters" of the 1837 panic. Such ... (more)

Another mock bank note parodying the "shinplasters" of the 1837 panic. Such small-denomination notes were based on the division of the Spanish dollar, the dominant specie of the time. Hence they were issued in sums of 6 (more accurately 6 1/4), 25, 50, and 75 cents. These fractional notes proliferated during the Panic of 1837 with the emergency suspension of specie (i.e., money in coin) payments by New York banks on May 10 of that year. "Treasury Note" and "Fifty Cents Shin Plaster" (nos. 1837-9 and -11) also use the bank note format to comment on the dismal state of American finances. Unlike these, however, "Humbug Glory Bank" is actually the same size as a real note. The note is payable to "Tumble Bug Benton," Missouri senator and hard-money advocate Thomas Hart Benton, and is signed by "Cunning Reuben [Whitney, anti-Bank adviser to Jackson and Van Buren] Cash'r" and "Honest Amos [Kendall, Postmaster General and influential advisor to Van Buren] Pres't." It shows several coins with the head of Andrew Jackson at left, a jackass with the title "Roman Firmness," a hickory leaf (alluding to Jackson's nickname "Old Hickory"), and a vignette showing Jackson's hat, clay pipe, spectacles, hickory stick, and veto (of the 1832 bill to recharter the Bank of the United States) in a blaze of light. Above is a quote from Jackson's March 1837 farewell address to the American people, "I leave this great people prosperous and happy."|Copyrighted by Anthony Fleetwood, 1837.|Published at 89 Nassau Str. New York.|Signed facetiously: Martin Van Buren Sc.|The print was deposited for copyright on August 21, 1837, by Anthony Fleetwood, and published at the same address (89 Nassau Street) as "Capitol Fashions" (no. 1837-1), also an etching. The Library's impression (the copyright deposit proof) is printed on extremely thin tissue.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-10. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Primary Source
Provider:
Library of Congress
Provider Set:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
"80 Rounds in Our Pants Pockets": Orville Quick Remembers Pearl Harbor
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"80 Rounds in Our Pants Pockets": Orville Quick Remembers Pearl Harbor

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, stunned virtually everyone in the ... (more)

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, stunned virtually everyone in the U.S. military: Japan's carrier-launched bombers found Pearl Harbor totally unprepared. In this 1991 interview, conducted by John Terreo for the Montana Historical Society, serviceman Orville Quick, who was assigned to build airfields and was very near Pearl Harbor on December 6, 1941, remembers the attack. He also provided a vivid, and humorous, account of the chaos from a soldier's point of view. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
Material Type:
Primary Source
Readings
Provider:
American Social History Project / Center for History Media and Learning
Provider Set:
Many Pasts (CHNM/ASHP)
Author:
Center for History and New Media/American Social History Project
9/11 Anniversary Teaching Guide
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9/11 Anniversary Teaching Guide

Our age-appropriate classroom lessons and activities for grades K-12 aim to deepen ... (more)

Our age-appropriate classroom lessons and activities for grades K-12 aim to deepen your students' understanding of September 11 and develop their critical thinking skills. The guide, written by Morningside Center executive director Tom Roderick, also includes recommended books and other teaching ideas. (less)

Subject:
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Lesson Plans
Teaching and Learning Strategies
Provider:
Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility
Provider Set:
Teachable Moment
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2002 llaF ,gnivloS melborP gnireenignE dna sretupmoC ot noitcudortnI

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