Keywords: Physical Sciences (4765)

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Hurricane Isabel 2003 Progression Images
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Hurricane Isabel 2003 Progression Images

This sequence of images was used to create an animation of the ... (more)

This sequence of images was used to create an animation of the progression of Hurricane Isabel as seen by the MODIS instruments on the Terra and Aqua satellites in September of 2003. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Jacques Descloitres
Lori Perkins
Stuart Snodgrass
Hurricane Isabel 2003 Rain Accumulation
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Hurricane Isabel 2003 Rain Accumulation

This animation shows rain accumulation from Hurricane Isabel from September 6 through ... (more)

This animation shows rain accumulation from Hurricane Isabel from September 6 through 20, 2003 based on data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis. The accumulation is shown in colors ranging from green (less than 50 mm of rain) through red (200 mm or more). The TRMM satellite, using the worlds only space-borne rain radar and other microwave instruments, measures rainfall over the ocean. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Jeff Halverson
Lori Perkins
Hurricane Isabel Barrels Down on the East Coast, September 15, 2003
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Hurricane Isabel Barrels Down on the East Coast, September 15, 2003

This animation is of Hurricane Isabel on September 15, 2003 as it ... (more)

This animation is of Hurricane Isabel on September 15, 2003 as it barrels toward the East Coast of the United States. At this time, Isabel had maximum sustained winds of 150 mph with gusts up to 160 mph. The eye of the storm has a diameter of 40 nautical miles. The storm is moving to the west-northwest at 7mph. The animation peels away the cloud layer and reveals the storms rain structure. The yellow isosurface represents areas where at least 0.5 inches of rain fell per hour. The green isosurface show 1.0 inches of rain per hour and red displays where more than 2 inches of rain fell per hour. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Jeff Halverson
Lori Perkins
Hurricane Isabel Batters North Carolina, September 18, 2003
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Hurricane Isabel Batters North Carolina, September 18, 2003

This animation is of Hurricane Isabel on September 18, 2003 as it ... (more)

This animation is of Hurricane Isabel on September 18, 2003 as it barrels toward the East Coast of the United States. At this time, Isabel was packing winds of 105 MPH and was downgraded to a Category 2 storm. The animation peels away the cloud layer and reveals the storms rain structure. The yellow isosurface represents areas where at least 0.5 inches of rain fell per hour. The green isosurface show 1.0 inches of rain per hour and red displays where more than 2 inches of rain fell per hour. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Jeff Halverson
Lori Perkins
Marte Newcombe
Hurricane Isabel Genesis
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Hurricane Isabel Genesis

This animation follows Hurricane Isabel (2003) from its birthplace in the Ethiopian ... (more)

This animation follows Hurricane Isabel (2003) from its birthplace in the Ethiopian Highlands of East Africa, across the Atlantic Ocean, to the United States. Atlantic hurricanes are often formed as winds over the Gulf of Aden intersect with the Ethiopian Highlands. This animation zooms into the Ethiopian Highlands and shows several storms being formed. Then, the animation dissolves in a reticle to focus in specifically on the formation of Hurricane Isabel. The reticle follows the storm across Africa and into the Atlantic. The path and intensity of Hurricane Isabel is depicted by a colored path. Blue represents the genesis of the storm. Green is a Tropical Depression where winds are less than 39 miles per hour. Yellow is a Tropical Storm where winds are between 39 and 73 miles per hour. Red is a category 1 hurricane where winds are between 74 and 95 miles per hour. Light Red is a category 2 hurricane with winds between 96 and 110 miles per hour. Magenta is a category 3 hurricane with winds between 111 and 130 miles per hour. Light magenta is a category 4 hurricane with winds between 131 and 154 miles per hour. White represents a category 5 hurricane where winds are greater than 155 miles per hour. Note how Isabel gains size and speed over the warm waters of the Atlantic. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Alex Kekesi
Greg Shirah
Jeff Halverson
Lori Perkins
Hurricane Isabel Prepares to Make Landfall in North Carolina, September 17, 2003
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Hurricane Isabel Prepares to Make Landfall in North Carolina, September 17, 2003

This animation is of Hurricane Isabel on September 17, 2003 as it ... (more)

This animation is of Hurricane Isabel on September 17, 2003 as it barrels toward the East Coast of the United States. At this time, Isabel was packing winds of 115 MPH and is classified as a Category 3 storm. The animation peels away the cloud layer and reveals the storms rain structure. The yellow isosurface represents areas where at least 0.5 inches of rain fell per hour. The green isosurface show 1.0 inches of rain per hour and red displays where more than 2 inches of rain fell per hour. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Jeff Halverson
Lori Perkins
Hurricane Isabel, September 8, 2003
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Hurricane Isabel, September 8, 2003

Hurricane Isabel on September 8, 2003 is the second major hurricane of ... (more)

Hurricane Isabel on September 8, 2003 is the second major hurricane of the 2003 season, measuring a Category 3 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. The storm has maximum sustained winds of 115 mph and is moving west-northwest at 14 mph. The animation peels away at the cloudtops and reveals the underlying rain structure. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Jeff Halverson
Lori Perkins
Hurricane Isabel north of Puerto Rico, September 14, 2003
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Hurricane Isabel north of Puerto Rico, September 14, 2003

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASAs Aqua satellite ... (more)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASAs Aqua satellite captured Hurricane Isabel on September 14, 2003. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Jacques Descloitres
Stuart Snodgrass
Hurricane Isodore on September 19, 2002
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Hurricane Isodore on September 19, 2002

Hurricane Isadore is the second Atlantic hurricane of the 2002 season. It ... (more)

Hurricane Isadore is the second Atlantic hurricane of the 2002 season. It brought 80 mph winds and tremendous rainfall to Cuba. The visualization depicts the overall rain structure of the storm. Yellow represents areas where at least 0.5 inches of rain fell per hour. Green shows at least 1.0 inch of rain, and red depicts more than 2.0 inches of rain per hour. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Jeff Halverson
Lori Perkins
Hurricane Ivan: Interpreting NOAA Advisories
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Hurricane Ivan: Interpreting NOAA Advisories

In this activity, students investigate data from Hurricane Ivan, the September 2004 ... (more)

In this activity, students investigate data from Hurricane Ivan, the September 2004 storm that devastated the Caribbean Islands and the Alabama Gulf Coast before looping across Florida and back into the Gulf of Mexico, where it regenerated into a new storm system. They will analyze data on the storm's location, windspeed, and barometric pressure, develop study questions, and map the hurricane's position at selected intervals. (less)

Subject:
Chemistry
Geoscience
Physics
Space Science
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Interactive
Provider:
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
New York State Earth Science Instructional Collection
Author:
Steve Kluge
Hurricane Ivan Rain Accumulation September 2-19, 2004 (close view)
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Hurricane Ivan Rain Accumulation September 2-19, 2004 (close view)

This animation shows rain accumulation between Hurricane Frances and Hurricane Ivan. The ... (more)

This animation shows rain accumulation between Hurricane Frances and Hurricane Ivan. The green path is the path Hurricane Frances took between August 25, 2004, and September 9, 2004. The red path is Hurricane Ivan from September 2, 2004, to September 19, 2004. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Greg Shirah
J. Shepherd
Hurricane Ivan Rain Accumulation September 2-19, 2004 (wide view)
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Hurricane Ivan Rain Accumulation September 2-19, 2004 (wide view)

This animation shows rain accumulation between Hurricane Frances and Hurricane Ivan. The ... (more)

This animation shows rain accumulation between Hurricane Frances and Hurricane Ivan. The green path is the path Hurricane Frances took between August 25, 2004, and September 9, 2004. The red path is Hurricane Ivan from September 2, 2004, to September 19, 2004. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Greg Shirah
J. Shepherd
Lori Perkins
Hurricane Ivan Rainfall Structure on September 13, 2004
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Hurricane Ivan Rainfall Structure on September 13, 2004

This animation zooms down to TRMMs view of Hurricane Ivan on September ... (more)

This animation zooms down to TRMMs view of Hurricane Ivan on September 13, 2004. It looks underneath of the storms clouds to reveal the underlying rain structure. Blue represents areas with at least 0.25 inches of rain per hour. Green shows at least 0.5 inches of rain per hour. Yellow is at least 1.0 inches of rain and Red is at least 2.0 inches of rain per hour. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Greg Shirah
Jeff Halverson
Lori Perkins
Hurricane Ivan Track and Intensity September 2-19, 2004
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Hurricane Ivan Track and Intensity September 2-19, 2004

This animation shows the position of the eye of Hurricane Ivan, as ... (more)

This animation shows the position of the eye of Hurricane Ivan, as well as, the intensity of the storm. The intensity of the storm is depicted through color. Purple is the weakest classification, Tropical Depression, where winds are less then 39 miles per hour. Blue represents a Tropical Storm with winds between 39 and 73 miles per hour. Blue-Green shows a Class 1 Hurricane with winds between 74 and 95 miles per hour. Green displays a Class 2 Hurricane with winds between 96 and 110 miles per hour. Yellow is a Class 3 Hurricane where winds are sustained between 111 and 130 miles per hour. Orange is a Class 4 Hurricane with winds between 131 and 154 miles per hour. Red is the most deadly classification where winds are greater then 155 miles per hour. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
J. Shepherd
Lori Perkins
Hurricane Ivan Track and Intensity September 2-23, 2004
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Hurricane Ivan Track and Intensity September 2-23, 2004

Hurricane Ivan made a very destructive path through the Caribbean and the ... (more)

Hurricane Ivan made a very destructive path through the Caribbean and the United States. Then, a portion of the storm looped south and brought unwanted rains to an already inundated areas of Florida and Texas. This animation shows the position of the eye of Hurricane Ivan, as well as, the intensity of the storm. The intensity of the storm is depicted through color. Purple is the weakest classification, Tropical Depression, where winds are less then 39 miles per hour. Blue represents a Tropical Storm with winds between 39 and 73 miles per hour. Blue-Green shows a Class 1 Hurricane with winds between 74 and 95 miles per hour. Green displays a Class 2 Hurricane with winds between 96 and 110 miles per hour. Yellow is a Class 3 Hurricane where winds are sustained between 111 and 130 miles per hour. Orange is a Class 4 Hurricane with winds between 131 and 154 miles per hour. Red is the most deadly classification where winds are greater then 155 miles per hour. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
J. Shepherd
Lori Perkins
Hurricane Katrina ESSEA module
Read the Fine Print

Hurricane Katrina ESSEA module

This problem-based learning activity uses Hurricane Katrina as the context for students ... (more)

This problem-based learning activity uses Hurricane Katrina as the context for students to conduct an Earth system analyses in order the answer the following questions: Are recent increases in the number and strength of hurricanes a result of an increased greenhouse effect and a warmer climate? Or are they the result of a natural cycle? (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Chemistry
Geoscience
Physics
Space Science
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Interactive
Lesson Plans
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA Wavelength
NASA Earth and Space Science Reviewed Collection
Author:
IGES
Hurricane Katrina: Possible Causes
Read the Fine Print

Hurricane Katrina: Possible Causes

This media-rich essay from NOVA scienceNow explores new research into hurricanes that ... (more)

This media-rich essay from NOVA scienceNow explores new research into hurricanes that may help explain Katrina's devastating impact and discusses the possibility that global warming played a role. ***Access to Teacher's Domain content now requires free login to PBS Learning Media. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Chemistry
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Geoscience
Physics
Space Science
Social Sciences
Education
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Images and Illustrations
Reference
Provider:
PBS LearningMedia
PBS Learning Media
University Corporation for Atmospheric Research
Provider Set:
PBS Learning Media: Multimedia Resources for the Classroom and Professional Development
Teachers' Domain
DLESE Community Collection
Author:
National Science Foundation
WGBH Educational Foundation
Hurricane Keith from TRMM: October 2, 2000
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Hurricane Keith from TRMM: October 2, 2000

3-D view of Hurricane Keith off Honduras from the TRMM satellite. Isosurfaces ... (more)

3-D view of Hurricane Keith off Honduras from the TRMM satellite. Isosurfaces are generated from TRMM PR and TMI data. Cloud height is generated from the TRMM IR data. Rain rate isosurfaces are 1 inch-hr (green) and 2 inches-hr (red). (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Other
Provider:
NASA
UCAR Staff
Provider Set:
NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio
Scientific Visualization Studio
Author:
Robert Adler
Tom Bridgman