Keywords: Molecular Biology (352)

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The Cell Walls that Bind the Tree of Life
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The Cell Walls that Bind the Tree of Life

This peer-reviewed resource from Bioscience Journal investigates the use of cell walls ... (more)

This peer-reviewed resource from Bioscience Journal investigates the use of cell walls to shed light on the phylogenetic relationships. Cell walls have evolved independently in many phyletically diverse clades, including the Eubacteria and Archaebacteria. However, a review of the available genetic and biochemical evidence indicates that the machinery responsible for synthesizing the cell walls of land plants, of their nearest algal relatives (the charophytes), and of some very ancient algal lineages (chlorophytes, rhodophytes, and phaeophytes) can be traced back to ancient primary endosymbiotic events involving Eubacteria (specifically cyanobacteria and proteobacteria). Lateral gene transfers attending secondary endosymbiotic events appear to be responsible for manufacturing the cell walls of more recently evolved photoautotrophic and heterotrophic lineages (e.g., euglenoids and tunicates). Recent research into the genetic basis of cell wall synthesis and chemical composition in bacteria, algae, and land plants continues to shed light on the phylogenetic relationships among a broad spectrum of evolutionarily and ecologically diverse organisms. (less)

Subject:
Chemistry
Ecology
Forestry and Agriculture
Life Science
Education
Material Type:
Reference
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
KARL J. NIKLAS (;)
Cells 2: The Cell as a System
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Cells 2: The Cell as a System

In this Science NetLinks lesson, students will begin to understand the cell ... (more)

In this Science NetLinks lesson, students will begin to understand the cell as a system by exploring a more familiar and tangible example of a system - a factory. Throughout the lesson, students will compare the factory to a cell, beginning to understand how both can be thought of as a system. This is the second (and final) Science NetLinks lesson in a short series on cells. (less)

Subject:
Mathematics
Chemistry
Engineering
Life Science
Education
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Lesson Plans
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Science Netlinks;
Cells 2: The Cell as a System
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Cells 2: The Cell as a System

In this Science NetLinks lesson, students will begin to understand the cell ... (more)

In this Science NetLinks lesson, students will begin to understand the cell as a system by exploring a more familiar and tangible example of a system - a factory. Throughout the lesson, students will compare the factory to a cell, beginning to understand how both can be thought of as a system. This is the second (and final) Science NetLinks lesson in a short series on cells. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Lesson Plans
Teaching and Learning Strategies
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Cells Alive
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Cells Alive

You probably have heard that hair is made up of dead cells. ... (more)

You probably have heard that hair is made up of dead cells. But are living cells really "alive"? (less)

Subject:
Life Science
Education
Material Type:
Audio Lectures
Instructional Material
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Science Update (AAAS;)
Cellular Respiration
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Cellular Respiration

Cellular respiration is the process by which our bodies convert glucose from ... (more)

Cellular respiration is the process by which our bodies convert glucose from food into energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). Start by exploring the ATP molecule in 3D, then use molecular models to take a step-by-step tour of the chemical reactants and products in the complex biological processes of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle, the Electron Transport Chain, and ATP synthesis. Follow atoms as they rearrange and become parts of other molecules and witness the production of high-energy ATP molecules. (less)

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Lecture Notes
Simulations
Provider:
Concord Consortium
Provider Set:
Concord Consortium Collection
Author:
The Concord Consortium
Cellular Screening
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Cellular Screening

One technique for discovering small molecules of biological relevance is to expose ... (more)

One technique for discovering small molecules of biological relevance is to expose cultured cells to a variety of small molecules and look for changes in the cells' appearance, behavior or other measurable qualities. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Video Lectures
Provider:
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Provider Set:
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology
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The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology

Legend: Transcription of DNA to RNA to protein: This dogma forms the ... (more)

Legend: Transcription of DNA to RNA to protein: This dogma forms the backbone of molecular biology and is represented by four major stages. 1. The DNA replicates its information in a process that involves many enzymes: replication. 2. The DNA codes for the production of messenger RNA (mRNA) during transcription. 3. In eucaryotic cells, the mRNA is processed (essentially by splicing) and migrates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. 4. Messenger RNA carries coded information to ribosomes. The ribosomes "read" this information and use it for protein synthesis. This process is called translation. Proteins do not code for the production of protein, RNA or DNA. They are involved in almost all biological activities, structural or enzymatic. (less)

Subject:
Mathematics
Life Science
Education
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
National Health Museum
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Access Excellence @ The National Health Museum: The Site for Health and Bioscience Teachers and Learners
Author:
Access Excellence
Access Excellence @ the National Health Museum REV
Permissions Manager (Access Excellence @ the National Health Museum REV)
Chemical Properties of Amino Acids and Identification of Unknown Amino Acids
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Chemical Properties of Amino Acids and Identification of Unknown Amino Acids

This resource is designed to illustrate the physical and chemical properties of ... (more)

This resource is designed to illustrate the physical and chemical properties of amino acids that determine the shapes and biological activities of proteins. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Chemistry
Life Science
Education
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Lesson Plans
Reference
Student Guide
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
University of Oregon
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE)
Author:
Carl Stiefbold (University of Oregon;)
Karen Sprague (University of Oregon;)
Sam Donovan (University of Oregon;)
The Chemistry of Cooley's Anemia
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The Chemistry of Cooley's Anemia

Young parents, Max and Andrea Forest, learn that their child is suffering ... (more)

Young parents, Max and Andrea Forest, learn that their child is suffering from the genetic disorder, thalassemia. Treatment requires a lifetime commitment to whole blood transfusion and chelation therapy, both of which must be administered on a daily to weekly basis. Students read the case, answer a series of questions, and then decide how they would treat the child if they were the parents. The case was developed to introduce students to the role of metal ions and coordination chemistry in biological systems. It would be appropriate for use in courses in biochemistry, molecular biology, bioinorganic chemistry, and bioethics, among others. (less)

Subject:
Chemistry
Life Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Instructional Material
Provider:
National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science
Provider Set:
Case Study Collection
Author:
Christopher T. Bailey
Mohammad Mahroof-Tahir
Chimeras;Animan Human Hybrid
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Chimeras;Animan Human Hybrid

This learning resource is a report by the Science Reports on Chimeras. ... (more)

This learning resource is a report by the Science Reports on Chimeras. It includes extended interviews, lesson plans and online forum and other relates resources on this topic. Some scientists are blending human cells with animals in order to make more human-like models for medical research. This so-called "chimeric" research has prompted heated debate inside and outside the scientific community.The Science Unit investigates the procedures and ethical dilemmas surrounding chimeric research. (less)

Subject:
Chemistry
Engineering
Life Science
Technology
Social Sciences
Education
Material Type:
Instructional Material
Lesson Plans
Reference
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
The Science Reports (;)
Chimpanzee Droppings Lead Scientists to Evolutionary Discovery
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Chimpanzee Droppings Lead Scientists to Evolutionary Discovery

This interrupted case study focuses on the research of Dr. Beatrice Hahn, ... (more)

This interrupted case study focuses on the research of Dr. Beatrice Hahn, who investigates DNA sequences in chimpanzee droppings in order to explore the origins of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Students first consider the types of data that can be gained through collecting chimpanzee feces and studying the behavior of these animals. Students then apply this information to learn more about microevolution when they compare DNA sequences. Finally, students learn about ELISA tests and consider the role of basic and applied science. This case study is appropriate for an introductory biology course for non-majors or majors. (less)

Subject:
Life Science
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Case Study
Instructional Material
Provider:
National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science
Provider Set:
Case Study Collection
Author:
Erica F. Kosal
Chromosome
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Chromosome

Chromosome structure from base pairs to chromosome in the nucleus.

Subject:
Mathematics
Life Science
Education
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
National Health Museum
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Access Excellence @ The National Health Museum: The Site for Health and Bioscience Teachers and Learners
Author:
Access Excellence @ the National Health Museum REV
Darryl Leja (Access Excellence @ the National Health Museum REV)
Darryl Leja (National Human Genome Research Institute REV)
The Collaboration of Proteins During Replication
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The Collaboration of Proteins During Replication

The major types of proteins, which must work together during the replication ... (more)

The major types of proteins, which must work together during the replication of DNA, are illustrated, showing their positions. When DNA replicates, many different proteins work together to accomplish the following steps: 1. The two parent strands are unwound with the help of DNA helicases. 2. Single stranded DNA binding proteins attach to the unwound strands, preventing them from winding back together. 3. The strands are held in position, binding easily to DNA polymerase, which catalyzes the elongation of the leading and lagging strands. (DNA polymerase also checks the accuracy of its own work!). 4. While the DNA polymerase on the leading strand can operate in a continuous fashion, RNA primer is needed repeatedly on the lagging strand to facilitate synthesis of Okazaki fragments. DNA primase, which is one of several polypeptides bound together in a group called primosomes, helps to build the primer. 5. Finally, each new Okazaki fragment is attached to the completed portion of the lagging strand in a reaction catalyzed by DNA ligase. (less)

Subject:
Mathematics
Life Science
Technology
Education
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
National Health Museum
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Access Excellence @ The National Health Museum: The Site for Health and Bioscience Teachers and Learners
Author:
Access Excellence
Access Excellence @ the National Health Museum REV
Permissions Manager (Access Excellence @ the National Health Museum REV)
Colon Cancer: A Case of Genetic Bad Luck?
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Colon Cancer: A Case of Genetic Bad Luck?

In this case, developed for an introductory genetics class, students meet a ... (more)

In this case, developed for an introductory genetics class, students meet a woman whose family has a history of colon cancer. Students create a pedigree based on information from the case and discuss what it means to be genetically predisposed to cancer. Using bioinformatics tools from the NCBI database, students identify and examine the mutation in the woman's APC gene that results in genetic predisposition to colon cancer. Finally, they investigate the biological function of the APC protein to understand why this mutation contributes to the development of cancer and determine whether APC is a proto-oncogene, tumor suppressor gene, or genome stability gene. (less)

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Case Study
Instructional Material
Provider:
National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science
Provider Set:
Case Study Collection
Author:
Anne M. Casper
Color-Coded DNA
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Color-Coded DNA

Many people now get their DNA tested for hereditary diseases, including Huntington's ... (more)

Many people now get their DNA tested for hereditary diseases, including Huntington's Disease and some cancers. But soon, DNA may also be used to diagnose infectious diseases, from salmonella to HIV. In this Science Update, you'll hear about a developing technology that could make this possible. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Audio Lectures
Provider:
AAAS
Provider Set:
Science Netlinks
Color-Coded DNA
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Color-Coded DNA

Many people now get their DNA tested for hereditary diseases, including Huntington's ... (more)

Many people now get their DNA tested for hereditary diseases, including Huntington's Disease and some cancers. But soon, DNA may also be used to diagnose infectious diseases, from salmonella to HIV. In this Science Update, you'll hear about a developing technology that could make this possible. (less)

Subject:
Life Science
Education
Material Type:
Audio Lectures
Instructional Material
Provider:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Provider Set:
BiosciEdNet (BEN): Digital Library Portal for Teaching and Learning in the Biological Sciences
Author:
Science Update;
Computational Biology
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Computational Biology

Introduction to the use of computers to automate data analysis or model ... (more)

Introduction to the use of computers to automate data analysis or model hypotheses in the field of biology, and its application for molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, neuroscience and evolution. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Full Course
Homework and Assignments
Readings
Syllabi
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Provider Set:
Saylor Foundation
Concepts of Biology
No Strings Attached

Concepts of Biology

Concepts of Biology is designed for the introductory biology course for nonmajors ... (more)

Concepts of Biology is designed for the introductory biology course for nonmajors taught at most two- and four-year colleges. The scope, sequence, and level of the program are designed to match typical course syllabi in the market. Concepts of Biology includes interesting applications, features a rich art program, and conveys the major themes of biology. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Full Course
Images and Illustrations
Readings
Textbooks
Provider:
Rice University
Provider Set:
OpenStax College
Concepts of Biology
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Concepts of Biology

Concepts of Biology is designed for the introductory biology course for nonmajors ... (more)

Concepts of Biology is designed for the introductory biology course for nonmajors taught at most two- and four-year colleges. The scope, sequence, and level of the program are designed to match typical course syllabi in the market. Concepts of Biology includes interesting applications, features a rich art program, and conveys the major themes of biology. (less)

Subject:
Life Science
Material Type:
Textbooks
Provider:
University of Minnesota
Provider Set:
University of Minnesota - Open Academics Textbooks
Author:
Samantha Fowler, Rebecca Roush, James Wise