Keywords: Free Fall (10)

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Capturing Homemade Microgravity
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Capturing Homemade Microgravity

This activity (page 2 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation ... (more)

This activity (page 2 of the PDF) is a full inquiry investigation into how ordinary things behave in microgravity, similar to what astronauts experience. Groups of learners will prepare a large drop box, complete with wireless camera, to drop off a balcony with an everyday phenomenon (e.g. burning candle, fizzing seltzer tablet, swinging pendulum) inside. After observing the object in ordinary gravity, it is placed inside the drop box and dropped so the camera can record images during free fall for analysis. Relates to linked video, DragonflyTV: Microgravity. (less)

Subject:
Mathematics
Chemistry
Engineering
Geoscience
Physics
Space Science
Technology
Social Sciences
Education
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
National Science Foundation
Twin Cities Public Television
Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.
Free Fall
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Free Fall

In this quick activity (page 1 of PDF), learners will use a ... (more)

In this quick activity (page 1 of PDF), learners will use a simple physics of motion and gravity demonstration to test their predicting skills. Learners predict which quarter will hit the floor first during this free fall experiment. This activity not only requires learners to observe carefully, but also listen carefully! Relates to the linked video, DragonflyTV: Hockey. (less)

Subject:
Chemistry
Physics
Space Science
Social Sciences
Education
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Simulations
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
National Science Foundation
Twin Cities Public Television
Twin Cities Public Television, Inc.
Free Fall Air Resistance Model
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Free Fall Air Resistance Model

This simulation allows students to compare the motion of free falling objects ... (more)

This simulation allows students to compare the motion of free falling objects with and without the influence of air resistance. Air resistance is the result of collisions of the object's leading surface with air molecules. On Earth, objects falling through the air usually encounter some sort of air resistance, though the amount is dependent upon several factors. In this model, a blue ball falls under the influence of gravity alone. A falling red ball is subject to both gravity and air resistance. Students can adjust the amount of air resistance with a slider. When the simulation is played, graphs are simultaneously plotted that show position vs. time, velocity vs. time, and acceleration vs. time for <u>both</u> falling balls. <b><i>See Annotations</b> for an editor-recommended, interactive tutorial that further explains free fall and air resistance.</i> This item was created with Easy Java Simulations (EJS), a modeling tool that allows users without formal programming experience to generate computer models and simulations. To run the simulation, simply click the Java Archive file below. To modify or customize the model, <b><i>See Related Materials</b> for detailed instructions on installing and running the EJS Modeling and Authoring Tool. </i> (less)

Subject:
Mathematics
Computing and Information
Engineering
Physics
Technology
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
Instructional Material
Interactive
Provider:
ComPADRE Digital Library
Provider Set:
ComPADRE Classroom-Ready Resources
Author:
Andrew Duffy
Free-Fall Bottles & Tubes
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Free-Fall Bottles & Tubes

In this physics activity, learners conduct two experiments to explore free-falling. In ... (more)

In this physics activity, learners conduct two experiments to explore free-falling. In the first experiment, water-filled plastic bottles with holes in them spurt water under normal conditions, but don't leak while in free-fall. In the second experiment, a ping-pong ball in a water-filled plastic tube floats upward under normal conditions, but remains motionless when the tube is dropped or thrown. Educators can use pre-assembled materials for group demonstration purposes. Note: this activity will get the floor wet, so consider doing this outside. (less)

Subject:
Mathematics
Chemistry
Engineering
Geoscience
Physics
Space Science
Technology
Education
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Simulations
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Don Rathjen
The Exploratorium
Free Fall Model
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Free Fall Model

This simulation allows students to examine the motion of an object in ... (more)

This simulation allows students to examine the motion of an object in free fall. <i><u>Download below.</i></u> The user can control the initial height (0-20m), set an initial velocity from -20 to 20 m/s, and change the rate of gravitational acceleration from zero to 20 m/s/s (Earth's gravitational constant is ~9.8 m/s/s). Students can also launch the ball upward from any point on the line of motion. The free fall is displayed as a motion diagram, while graphs are simultaneously displayed showing position vs. time, velocity vs. time, and acceleration vs. time. <b><i>See Annotations</b> for an editor-recommended tutorial that further explains how graphs are used to represent free fall motion.</i> This item was created with Easy Java Simulations (EJS), a modeling tool that allows users without formal programming experience to generate computer models and simulations. To run the simulation, simply click the Java Archive file below. </i> (less)

Subject:
Mathematics
Computing and Information
Physics
Technology
Material Type:
Data
Instructional Material
Interactive
Provider:
ComPADRE Digital Library
Provider Set:
ComPADRE Classroom-Ready Resources
Author:
Andrew Duffy
Modeling Physics with Easy Java Simulations: TPT Package
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Modeling Physics with Easy Java Simulations: TPT Package

This Java archive contains a collection of simple Easy Java Simulations (EJS) ... (more)

This Java archive contains a collection of simple Easy Java Simulations (EJS) programs for the teaching of computer-based modeling. The materials and text of this resource appeared in an article of the same name in The Physics Teacher [Phys. Teach. 76, No. 45, pp. 474-480 (2007)]. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Simulations
Provider:
comPADRE
Provider Set:
Open Source Physics
Newtonian Physics
Remix and Share

Newtonian Physics

Some of the topics addressed in this book are: Scaling and Order-of-Magnitude ... (more)

Some of the topics addressed in this book are: Scaling and Order-of-Magnitude Estimates; Velocity and Relative Motion; Acceleration and Free Fall; Force and Motion; Analysis of Forces; Newton's Laws in Three Dimensions; Vectors; Circular Motion; Gravity. (less)

Subject:
Science and Technology
Material Type:
Textbooks
Provider:
Light and Matter
Provider Set:
Light and Matter - Physics and astronomy resources
Author:
Ben
Crowell
Physics Teaching Technology Resource: Learning Cycle on Projectile Motion
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Physics Teaching Technology Resource: Learning Cycle on Projectile Motion

This learning cycle features six videotaped experiments, organized sequentially for introducing the ... (more)

This learning cycle features six videotaped experiments, organized sequentially for introducing the topic of projectile motion in introductory physics courses. Each video includes learning goal, prior information needed to understand the material, and questions for learners. Students will observe, engage in qualitative and quantitative analysis, and perform an application experiment. The instructional method is based on cognitive apprenticeship, in which students focus on the <i>process</i> of science by observing, modeling, predicting, testing, and revising (in that order). <b><i>See Related Materials</b> for links to the full collection by the same authors and for free access to an article explaining the pedagogy behind the learning cycles.</i> (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Physics
Technology
Education
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Simulations
Provider:
ComPADRE Digital Library
Provider Set:
ComPADRE Classroom-Ready Resources
Author:
Eugenia Etkina
SmartGraphs: Was Galileo Right?
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SmartGraphs: Was Galileo Right?

This interactive graphing activity allows learners to explore the effects of gravity ... (more)

This interactive graphing activity allows learners to explore the effects of gravity on light and heavy objects. First, students use a graph sketching tool to predict the Position vs. Time and Velocity vs. Time graphs for a light ball falling 2 meters to the ground. Next, they repeat the prediction sketches for a heavy ball. Graphs are then automatically generated to show data based on actual timed trials. As students compare the accurate results to their predictions, they perform scaffolded calculations to determine the slope of a line. By the conclusion of the activity, learners are expected to discover that: 1) heavy and light objects fall at the same rate of acceleration, and 2) acceleration can be calculated from data in a Velocity vs. Time graph. This item is part of the Concord Consortium, a nonprofit research and development organization dedicated to transforming education through technology. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Mathematics
Physics
Technology
Education
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Data
Images and Illustrations
Instructional Material
Provider:
ComPADRE Digital Library
Provider Set:
ComPADRE Classroom-Ready Resources
Author:
National Science Foundation
Springs and Stomachs
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Springs and Stomachs

In this demonstration, learners investigate mass, gravity, and acceleration by dropping a ... (more)

In this demonstration, learners investigate mass, gravity, and acceleration by dropping a wooden bar with a balloon attached to its underside, a mass suspended from it by rubber bands, and a sharp-pointed screw pointing upward from the top of the mass. This activity also helps learners understand why stomach muscles feel uncomfortable and tense during a free fall or on a roller coaster. Learners can also explore this concept by dropping a slinky. (less)

Subject:
History, Law, Politics
Mathematics
Chemistry
Engineering
Geoscience
Life Science
Physics
Space Science
Technology
Social Sciences
Education
Material Type:
Activities and Labs
Instructional Material
Simulations
Provider:
Science and Math Informal Learning Educators (SMILE)
Provider Set:
SMILE Pathway: Science and Math Activities in One Search
Author:
Don Rathjen
The Exploratorium
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