Saylor Academy Collection Resources (304)

View
Selected filters:
  • The Saylor Foundation
20th Century Art
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Examination of the cultural and artistic developments of the twentieth century in ...

Examination of the cultural and artistic developments of the twentieth century in Europe and the United States, surveying the artwork of Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dadaism, Surrealism, Pop Art, and Op-Art, and Modern and Postmodern architecture.

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Visual Arts
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Abnormal Behavior
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will help to define abnormal and normal behaviors and to ...

This course will help to define abnormal and normal behaviors and to group these abnormal phenomena into 'disorders.' It will cover the basic concepts surrounding the diagnosis and treatment of abnormal psychological phenomena. The student will investigate the characteristics, epidemiology, controversy, and treatment of individual disorders. The student will begin by defining normal versus abnormal behavior and reviewing the historical context in which abnormal psychology emerged, then discuss the major theories or paradigms associated with abnormal psychology, the classification system used to differentiate and define disorders, and the research methods often utilized in the study of abnormal psychology. Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to: describe the historical context from which the current conceptualization of abnormal psychology has evolved; identify and describe the main theoretical perspectives/paradigms which have influenced the field of abnormal psychology; identify and differentiate the classification of psychological disorders; evaluate treatment approaches; explain the major research findings for each group of disorders and how they add to our knowledge of the causes and treatment of psychological disorders. (Psychology 401)

Subject:
Psychology
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Abstract Algebra II
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course is a continuation of Abstract Algebra I: the student will ...

This course is a continuation of Abstract Algebra I: the student will revisit structures like groups, rings, and fields as well as mappings like homomorphisms and isomorphisms. The student will also take a look at ring factorization, general lattices, and vector spaces. Later this course presents more advanced topics, such as Galois theory - one of the most important theories in algebra, but one that requires a thorough understanding of much of the content we will study beforehand. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Compute the sizes of finite groups when certain properties are known about those groups; Identify and manipulate solvable and nilpotent groups; Determine whether a polynomial ring is divisible or not and divide the polynomial (if it is divisible); Determine the basis of a vector space, change bases, and manipulate linear transformations; Define and use the Fundamental Theorem of Invertible Matrices; Use Galois theory to find general solutions of a polynomial over a field. (Mathematics 232)

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Accounting Principles I
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Though accounting may seem like a dense and complex subject, this course ...

Though accounting may seem like a dense and complex subject, this course is designed to present the accounting cycle in an accessible and logical manner. It will provide you with a solid understanding of basic accounting principles and will introduce you to financial statement analysis.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Accounting
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Advanced Artificial Intelligence
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will present advanced topics in Artificial Intelligence (AI), including inquiries ...

This course will present advanced topics in Artificial Intelligence (AI), including inquiries into logic, artificial neural network and machine learning, and the Turing machine. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: define the term 'intelligent agent,' list major problems in AI, and identify the major approaches to AI; translate problems into graphs and encode the procedures that search the solutions with the graph data structures; explain the differences between various types of logic and basic statistical tools used in AI; list the different types of learning algorithms and explain why they are different; list the most common methods of statistical learning and classification and explain the basic differences between them; describe the components of Turing machine; name the most important propositions in the philosophy of AI; list the major issues pertaining to the creation of machine consciousness; design a reasonable software agent with java code. (Computer Science 408)

Subject:
Computer Science
Philosophy
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Advanced Databases
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will expand upon SQL as well as other advanced topics, ...

This course will expand upon SQL as well as other advanced topics, including query optimization, concurrency, data warehouses, object-oriented extensions, and XML. Additional topics covered in this course will help you become more proficient in writing queries and will expand your knowledge base so that you have a better understanding of the field. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: write complex queries, including full outer joins, self-joins, sub queries, and set theoretic queries; write stored procedures and triggers; apply the principles of query optimization to a database schema; explain the various types of locking mechanisms utilized within database management systems; explain the different types of database failures as well as the methods used to recover from these failures; design queries against a distributed database management system; perform queries against database designed with object-relational extensions; develop and query XML files. (Computer Science 410)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry is designed to give you the knowledge to explain ...

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry is designed to give you the knowledge to explain everyday phenomena of inorganic complexes. The student will study the various aspects of their physical and chemical properties and learn how to determine the practical applications that these complexes can have in industrial, analytical, and medicinal chemistry. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Explain symmetry and point group theory and demonstrate knowledge of the mathematical method by which aspects of molecular symmetry can be determined; Use molecular symmetry to predict or explain the chemical properties of a molecule, such as dipole moment and allowed spectroscopic transitions; Construct simple molecular orbital diagrams and obtain bonding information from them; Demonstrate an understanding of valence shell electron pair repulsion (VSEPR), which is used for predicting the shapes of individual molecules; Explain spectroscopic information obtained from coordination complexes; Identify the chemical and physical properties of transition metals; Demonstrate an understanding of transition metal organometallics; Define the role of catalysts and explain how they affect the activation energy and reaction rate of a chemical reaction; Identify the mechanisms of both ligand substitution and redox processes in transition metal complexes; Discuss some current, real-world applications of transition metal complexes in the fields of medicinal chemistry, solar energy, electronic displays, and ion batteries. (Chemistry 202)

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Advanced Organic Chemistry
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

Organic chemistry is the discipline that studies the properties and reactions of ...

Organic chemistry is the discipline that studies the properties and reactions of organic, carbon-based compounds. The student will begin by studying a unit on ylides, benzyne, and free radicals. Many free radicals affect life processes. For example, oxygen-derived radicals may be overproduced in cells, such as white blood cells that try to defend against infection in a living organism. Afterward the student will move into a comprehensive examination of stereochemistry, as well as the kinetics of substitution and elimination reactions. The course wraps up with a survey of various hetereocyclic structures, including their MO theory, aromaticity, and reactivity. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Describe free radicals in terms of stability, kinetics, and bond dissociation energies; Describe the stereochemistry and orbitals involved in photochemical reactions; Describe enantiomers, diastereomers, pro-S and pro-R hydrogens, and Re/Si faces of carbonyls; Perform conformational analysis of alkanes and cyclohexanes; Describe reaction mechanisms in terms of variousparameters (i.e.,kinetics, Curtin-Hammet principle, Hammond postulate,etc.); Describe the chemistry of the heterocycles listed in Unit3 in terms of molecular orbital theory, aromaticity, and reactions. (Chemistry 201)

Subject:
Chemistry
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Advanced Statistics
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course is oriented toward US high school students. The course is ...

This course is oriented toward US high school students. The course is divided into 10 units of study. The first five units build the foundation of concepts, vocabulary, knowledge, and skills for success in the remainder of the course. In the final five units, we will take the plunge into the domain of inferential statistics, where we make statistical decisions based on the data that we have collected.

Subject:
Statistics and Probability
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Advertising and Promotion (Business 306)
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

The purpose of this course is to lead students in an exploration ...

The purpose of this course is to lead students in an exploration of fundamental advertising principles and the role advertising plays in the promotional mix. You will learn where advertising fits in the Marketing Mix, also known as the four Ps: Product, Price, Place, and Promotion. Although some consider all promotion synonymous with advertising, you will learn the unique characteristics that separate advertising from other forms of promotional communication. You will revisit some familiar marketing concepts within a new framework, approaching the subject from the advertiserŐs perspective.

Subject:
Business and Communication
Marketing
Material Type:
Activity/Lab
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
African-American Literature
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course considers the impact of storytelling and spirituals on the literary ...

This course considers the impact of storytelling and spirituals on the literary production of African American authors from the Colonial period to the current day, examining the cultural, historical, and political contexts of the literature, as well as how the issues of gender, race, and class affect the production and meaning of these works. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the cultural influences and the development of African American literature; analyze the evolution of African American literature from an oral to a literary tradition; define the functions of African American literature from its inception in the period of slavery to the contemporary period; identify the major authors and/or literary works in the various literary periods and movements (Reconstruction to the New Negro Renaissance Movement; Harlem Renaissance; Realism, Naturalism, and modernism; Black Arts; and the Contemporary Period). This free course may be completed online at any time. (English Literature 411)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Literature
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
African Art
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the art and architecture of ...

This course will introduce the student to the art and architecture of Africa from a Western art historical perspective. This course will emphasize the role of art as manifested in the lifestyles, spiritualities, and philosophies of particular African societies, while also broaching aesthetic principles and the study and display of African art. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: demonstrate an understanding of transitions in the national geography of the African continent from the 17th century to the present; demonstrate an understanding of the ethnic diversity and distinct cultural traditions among people of Africa; identify and discuss materials and techniques employed in the creation of a range of African artistic and architectural works; discuss the functions and meanings of a range of African art forms; identify traditional styles and forms strongly associated with particular cultural groups. (Art History 304)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Ethnic Studies
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
African Politics
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will provide the student with a broad overview of African ...

This course will provide the student with a broad overview of African politics placed within the context of Africa's recent history, taking into account Africa's colonial relationships and then the post-colonial period. This course will analyze on the internal workings and challenges of African states, including their movements towards democratization, their economic statuses, the connections between their governmental and non-governmental institutions/organizations, and the various ways in which their societies and cultures impact their politics. This course also asks questions about the nature of Africa's conflicts, reviewing larger trends within Africa's political economy, and inquiring about the promise of continental and sub-continental political integration efforts. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain how colonialism and independence movements contributed to and shaped contemporary African statehood; identify the main causes of state and political failure in Africa; define underdevelopment and explain the causes of economic failure in Africa; discuss the causes of civil and interstate conflict in Africa; apply knowledge of Africa's history to explain current causes of crisis and the roles of different actors within the state and international community; compare and contrast economically and politically stable states with those that are unstable and identify the main features of stability; identify and explain some of the major social, cultural, and economic challenges (such as HIV/AIDS) that contemporary African states face, as well as the role international actors play in addressing these challenges. (Political Science 325)

Subject:
Economics
Political Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
The Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World, 1776-1848
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course introduces the history of the Age of Revolutions in the ...

This course introduces the history of the Age of Revolutions in the Atlantic World from 1776 to 1848. Running alongside and extending beyond these political revolutions is the First Industrial Revolution. The Atlantic World, dominated by European empires in 1776, was transformed through revolution into a series of independent states by 1848, experiencing profound changes through the development and consolidation of capitalism. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: think analytically about the history of the revolutionary age between 1776 and 1848; define what a revolution" means as well as describe what made 1776-1848 an "age of revolution"; define the concept of the Atlantic World and describe its importance in World History; explain the basic intellectual and technical movements associated with the Enlightenment and their relations to the revolutionary movements that follow; identify and describe the causes of the American Revolution; identify and describe the many stages of the French Revolution: the end of absolutist monarchy, the implementation of constitutional monarchy, and the rise of the Jacobin Republic; compare and contrast the Declaration of the Rights of Man and other major statements of the Revolutionary period and Enlightenment thinking; identify and describe the impact of the first successful slave rebellion in world history--the Haitian Revolution; compare and contrast the debate between Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate the causes and effects of the Age of Revolutions. This free course may be completed online at any time. (History 303)

Subject:
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Textbook
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
The Age of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1500-1900
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic ...

This course will introduce the student to the history of the Atlantic slave trade from 1500 to 1900. The student will learn about the slave trade, its causes, and its effects on Africa, Europe, and the Americas. By the end of the course, the student will understand how the Atlantic slave trade began as a fledgling enterprise of the English, Portuguese, and Spanish in the 1500s and why, by the mid-eighteenth century, the trade dominated Atlantic societies and economies. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: think analytically about the various meanings of 'slave' and 'slavery' during the age of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'triangular trade' and define the Atlantic World; identify and describe the logic for enslavement of Africans by Europeans; identify and describe the African ethnic groups enslaved by Europeans and those captives' New World destinations; identify and describe the early slaving voyages of the Portuguese and Spanish. Students will also be able to describe how the Dutch and English later inserted themselves into the trade; identify and describe the expansion of the plantation complex in the New World in the 1600s and its impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze the rise of European empires and the parallel expansion of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and analyze slavery within African societies. They will also be able to identify and describe the trans-Saharan slave trade and the Red Sea/Indian Ocean slave trade; identify and describe the nature of the African slave market and principal slaving ports in western Africa; analyze and describe New World slave societies and their impact on the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the 'Middle Passage' of the Atlantic slave trade; identify and describe the causes for the abolition of the Atlantic slave trade in the nineteenth century; analyze and interpret primary source documents that elucidate all aspects of the Atlantic slave trade. (History 311)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
World History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Lecture
Lecture Notes
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Algebra
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course discusses how to use algebra for a variety of everyday ...

This course discusses how to use algebra for a variety of everyday tasks, such as calculate change without specifying how much money is to be spent on a purchase, analyzing relationships by graphing, and describing real-world situations in business, accounting, and science.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Algebra I
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course is oriented toward US high school students. Its structure and ...

This course is oriented toward US high school students. Its structure and materials are aligned to the US Common Core Standards. Foci include: graphing, equations and inequalities.

Subject:
Algebra
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
Algorithms
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course focuses on the fundamentals of computer algorithms, emphasizing methods useful ...

This course focuses on the fundamentals of computer algorithms, emphasizing methods useful in practice. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: explain and identify the importance of algorithms in modern computing systems and their place as a technology in the computing industry; indentify algorithms as a pseudo-code to solve some common problems; describe asymptotic notations for bounding algorithm running times from above and below; explain methods for solving recurrences useful in describing running times of recursive algorithms; explain the use of Master Theorem in describing running times of recursive algorithms; describe the divide-and-conquer recursive technique for solving a class of problems; describe sorting algorithms and their runtime complexity analysis; describe the dynamic programming technique for solving a class of problems; describe greedy algorithms and their applications; describe concepts in graph theory, graph-based algorithms, and their analysis; describe tree-based algorithms and their analysis; explain the classification of difficult computer science problems as belonging to P, NP, and NP-hard classes. (Computer Science 303)

Subject:
Computer Science
Material Type:
Full Course
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation
American Art
Conditions of Use:
Read the Fine Print
Rating

This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the ...

This course surveys art of America from the colonial era through the post-war 20th century. The student will consider broad stylistic tendencies in various regions and periods and examine specific artists and works of art in historical and social contexts, with emphasis on the congruent evolution of contemporary American multi-cultural identity. Overarching issues that have interested major scholars of American art and its purview include the landscape (wilderness, Manifest Destiny, rural settlement, and urban development); the family and gender roles; the founding rhetoric of freedom and antebellum slavery; and notions of artistic modernism through the 20th century. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: Understand the historical (geographic, political) formation of the present United States of America; Be familiar with renowned influential American artists from the 18th through the 20th century; Be conversant in common stylistic designations used in Western art of the 17th through 20th centuries; Recognize subjects and forms in American art through history that mark its distinction; Be able to engage specific images, objects, and structures from different critical perspectives to consider their functions and meanings. (Art History 210)

Subject:
Arts and Humanities
Art History
Material Type:
Assessment
Full Course
Homework/Assignment
Lecture
Reading
Syllabus
Provider:
The Saylor Foundation