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Overview:
By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination
Professor Magne Bråtveit, Occupational and Environmental Health, and Professor Bente E. Moen, CIH, University of Bergen

London’s lethal fog of 1952 was a result of coal burning and temperature inversions. It brought the issue of air pollution to public attention. It resulted in 12 000 deaths and 150 000 hospitalisations. As a result, Britain passed the Clean Air Act of 1956. Health complications due to air pollution make it among the 10 leading factors for death in most countries. It is responsible for about 1 in every 9 deaths around the world every year. It is listed as number 6 in the 10 leading risk factors posted by the Global Burden of Disease.

Air pollutions is due to chemicals, gases, particles or biological material in the atmosphere that lead to discomfort and undesirable health effects such as airway diseases, cancer, and cardiovascular diseases, all of which can lead to death.
Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Level:
College / Upper Division, Graduate / Professional
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Date Added:
09/13/2018
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0
Language:
English
Media Format:
Text/HTML

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