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Description

Overview:
Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all
Professor Bjarne Robberstad, CIH, CISMAC, University of Bergen

Robberstad began his presentation by stating that “universal” is a big word! Universality must be considered along several dimensions.

Robberstad used a visual model to explain the interaction between competing factors. He suggests that a box, or the WHO “cube”, is a useful framework for considering universal coverage. Population, or who is covered, is one dimension. Financing, or cost sharing, is a second dimension. The third dimension is which services are included – which are most essential?
The next step is to consider the size of the box. The largest box would represent a hypothetical situation, where everything is possible and covered for everyone. Boxes of smaller sizes represent the compromises that are necessary to design for the actual coverage possible within given budget constraints.

This is priority setting – the challenges of trade-offs and compromises in health-care service plans.
Subject:
Health, Medicine and Nursing
Level:
College / Upper Division, Graduate / Professional
Material Type:
Lecture
Author:
Date Added:
09/13/2018
License:
Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0
Language:
English
Media Format:
Text/HTML

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