Identifying & Using Evidence in Persuasive Writing - Remix

Design Guide - Identifying & Using Evidence in Persuasive Writing

Designers for Learning - Adult Learning Zone


Table of Contents

Project Requirements

Part 1: Lesson Description

Lesson Title

Abstract

Learner Audience / Primary Users

Educational Use

Language

Material Type

Keywords

Time Required for Lesson

Targeted Skills

Learning Goals

College & Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) Alignment

Prior Knowledge

Required Resources

Lesson Author & License

Part 2: Lesson

Learning Objectives

Lesson Topics

Context Summary

Relevance to Practice

Key Terms and Concepts

Instructional Strategies and Activities

Warm-Up

Introduction

Presentation / Modeling / Demonstration

Guided Practice

Evaluation

Application

Part 3: Supplementary Resources & References

Supplementary Resources

References

Attribution Statements


Part 1: Lesson Description

Lesson Title

Identifying & Using Evidence in Persuasive Writing

Abstract

The learner audience for this lesson are adults preparing for the GED, specifically the English/Language Arts portion. The lesson introduces “evidence” as a necessary support for claims in a persuasive essay, or argument.  It demonstrates the relationship between words and ideas that are cited in support of a claim,  and the key ideas in a passage, or passages.  Learners practice using evidence to support a claim about the role of motivation and procrastination in their own lives, then find at least one piece of evidence from an article on that topic.  

Learner Audience / Primary Users

Audience is adults who have not finished high school.  Many adult learners have had wrong turns and setbacks moving forward in their lives.  They’ve frequently found little validation in academic settings, which means they’re on their own in terms of motivation.  If they can figure out how to cultivate new habits and mindsets regarding short-term and long-term goals, it should be a big step in the right direction. The psychology topic embedded in this lesson is intended to support their efforts, while also teaching a necessary writing skill. Although learner backgrounds and personal histories vary widely, users’ willingness to work toward a GED sets them apart from peers who never take that step.  Adult learners need to sense respect for their life knowledge and maturity, so scaffolding has to be thoughtfully designed to provide sufficient help, without appearing to be condescending.

Educational Use

Curriculum / Instruction

College & Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) Alignment

  • Level: Adult Education
  • Grade Level: E (9-12)
  • Subject: English/Language Arts
  • Strand: Reading and Writing
  • Standard Description:
    (Reading) CCR Anchor 1:  Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly, as well as inferences drawn from the text.
    (Writing) CCR Anchor 9:  Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection and research.

Language

English

Material Type

  • Instructional Material
  • Readings and Guided Practice

Learning Goals

The purpose of this lesson is for learners to be able to:

  • Explain the purpose of evidence in support of an argument, opinion, or claim
  • Identify various types of evidence within a document, or other source (i.e., expert opinion, statistics, report, personal anecdote, etc.)
  • Identify evidence that is relevant to a claim
  • Independently identify, and use, evidence from a document in support of an argument, opinion, or claim

Keywords

  • Designers for Learning
  • Adult Education
  • Writing, evidence, claims, informational texts

Time Required for Lesson

60 Minutes

Prior Knowledge

  • Ability to read fiction/non-fiction text(s) at a 9th-grade level
  • Understanding of how to identify main topics/sub-topics in a text
  • Ability to distinguish facts vs. opinions
  • Understanding of “argument”, as used in persuasive writing

Required Resources

Internet, in order to access the Open Author online lesson and web page links.  Alternative:  The ability to download, and/or print articles and worksheet for learner use offline.

Lesson Author & License

  • Lesson Author: Sharon Minnoch

Part 2: Lesson

Learning Objectives

By the end of this lesson, the learners should be able to:

  • Identify evidence (within a document) that is relevant to a specific claim, argument, or opinion
  • Explain evidence in their own words (paraphrase)
  • Describe how evidence effectively supports a stated claim
  • Write a short paragraph stating a claim in in their own words, then connect that claim to a quote (from the article provided) to support it using sample phrases.

Lesson Topics

Key topics covered in this lesson include:

What really helps people change their habits? Learners read: “The Psychological Origins of Procrastination - and How We Can Stop Putting Things Off”.  The article serves, then, as a source of evidence for what does, or does not work, whichever position matches the claim statement learners devise, based on their own experience.

Context Summary

Writing to persuade others is most effective when the author uses “evidence” from real events (personal stories), quotes experts’ opinions, or statistics, from reliable sources (reputable newspapers/magazines, authors with a background in the field, government/, industry studies and surveys, etc.).  

Relevance to Practice

This lesson serves two purposes:
  1) Exploring a topic that helps learners reflect on how well they are able to “drive” their own productivity, and
  2) Demonstrating how evidence supports an argument, then providing practice in the use of evidence.

Productivity and self-motivation are important factors for education and career success.  Self-knowledge is a first step in achieving more personal success.  The ability to cite evidence effectively is an important English/Language Arts skill, and part of the CCRS standards and GED test.  It’s also important to work situations.  Examples: a) “x” is not shipping correctly, because “y” information (evidence) isn’t being recorded correctly, or b) this report excerpt (evidence) explains the desired outcome of “x”.  The ability to successfully explain “evidence of experience, or skill, that matches a job description may mean the difference between being hired, or not.

Key Terms and Concepts

Argument / Persuasive Writing
Evidence
Paraphrasing

Instructional Strategies and Activities

Warm-Up

Time: 5 minutes

Evidence (Definition:   The available body of facts of information indicating whether a belief or proposition is true or valid)

Learners are asked to recall  “evidence” from their own lives about how internet increased or decreased their efficiency.  Suggest they then consider an argument they may have had over politics, the needs of their neighborhood, climate change, or any controversial topic.  Ask whether they felt they could cite good evidence for their “side,” or struggled instead to make a convincing case.  Finally, discuss how the ability to find, understand, and use reliable, relevant evidence can be one of the best ways for a speaker, or writer, to gain respect, and even admiration. 

Introduction

Time: 1 minute

This lesson is about using evidence found in written documents, like news articles, or other informational "text” to support an argument, opinion, or claim.  

Presentation / Modeling / Demonstration

Time: 19 minutes

Learners:

  • View a claim statement, with key concepts or phrases italicized or bolded
  • View an article excerpt on the topic referenced in the claim
  • See evidence/claim relationships italicized
  • View explanations for italicized and bolded portions


Download: Citing_Evidence__Demonstration.pdf


Article:  Psychological Tips for Resisting the Internet's Grip
  
 Claim:  The Internet is full of good information, but it’s also a place to get lost and waste time.  Because of that, strategies for managing one's time online are useful.
 Evidence (from article):  “Content on the net isn’t only <designed to grab our attention>; some of it is <specifically built to keep us coming back for more>: {notifications when someone replies to a posts, or power rankings based on up-votes.} These *cues trigger the reward system in our brains* because they’ve become associated with the potent reinforcer of social approval”.

< >:  These phrases support the claim that the Internet may be “a place to get lost and waste time” for many people.

{ } :  Examples of design to grab attention end to keep people coming back

* *:  This phrase suggests scientific evidence, with words like brain “triggers” and “reward system”.  It supports the second part of the claim that one may need to use strategies to resist things that trigger something in  one’s brain.

Additional activities:

1) Ask students to search the full article for more evidence. 
 
2) Ask students to explain evidence in their own words (paraphrase):

"Evidence" statement above, paraphrased:
     Content on the Internet can be very addictive.  It's designed to get our attention, then keep it, by offering     participation that makes our brains happy. 


Guided Practice

Time: 25 minutes

Learners are asked to consider how they motivate themselves, avoid procrastination, and act to complete necessary tasks (or, adeversely, have difficulty doing these things).

  • Learners then:

1.     claim statement

2.     evidence (support)

3.     kind of evidence

4.     paraphrase evidence in their own words

5.   explanation why evidence supports the claim



 


Download: Explain_Your_Evidence.pdf


 Explain Your Evidence
Evidence (copy/paste, or type here) :

 
 Type of evidence (i.e. expert opinion, research, personal experience etc.):


 Paraphrase the evidence (explain in your own words):


 Explain how and why the evidence supports the claim.




Evaluation

Time: 10 minutes

Instructors / learners compare worksheet responses to a “Citing Evidence” rubric.  Responses should achieve “Excellent” or "Adequate" level.  If not, learners review the lesson.

Download: Evidence Rubric.pdf


Application - Extended Time

Time: 20 minutes

Using examples from their own lives, students do one or more of the following:  

1) Write a reflection on how they might apply the knowledge learned from the article
2) Create a “tip” sheet for peers on avoiding procrastination
3) Use their notes to participate in a discussion with peers about overcoming procrastination/motivation issues.

Part 3: Supplementary Resources & References

Supplementary Resources

The articles used as a text for this lesson (The Psychological Origins of Procrastination, and Psychological Tips for Resisting the Internet's Grip) were found at: https://theconversation.com/us, which has many additional articles on these, and other topics.

“Evidence” criteria from Short Response Rubric and Checklist.  Additional materials for Grade 10 “ELA & Literacy Curriculum” from this draft New York State resource expand on persuasive writing topics.

Persuasive Writing: A Classroom Model

References

Berkman, E. (March 1, 2016). Psychological Tips for Resisting the Internet's Grip. Retrieved from: https://theconversation.com/psychological-tips-for-resisting-the-internets-grip-52046

Berkman, E., & Miller-Ziegler, J. (October 7, 2015). The Psychological Origins of Procrastination - and How We Can Stop Putting Things Off. The Conversation. Retrieved from: https://theconversation.com/the-psychological-origins-of-procrastination-and-how-we-can-stop-putting-things-off-47905

Public Consulting Group. Engage NY (2014). NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum. Grade 10, Module 1, Short Response Rubric and Checklist. DRAFT.  Retrieved from: http://www.moboces.org/cms/lib09/NY01914077/Centricity/Domain/31/Grade%2010%20Module%201%20Supporting%20Materials.pdf

Attribution Statements

 “The Conversation” terms of use statement: “We believe in the free flow of information. We use a Creative Commons Attribution NoDerivatives licence, so you can republish our articles for free, online or in print.”

Public Consulting Group. Engage NY: p. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License

CC Attribution


This course content is offered by Designers for Learning under a CC Attribution license.
Content in this course can be considered under this license unless otherwise noted.        
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(Design Guide effective March 2, 2016)

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