Keywords: Tammany Hall (15)

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Democratic Simplicity Or The Arrival of Our Favourite Son

Democratic Simplicity Or The Arrival of Our Favourite Son

A satirical attack on alleged excesses in the Van Buren administration and ... (more)

A satirical attack on alleged excesses in the Van Buren administration and on the President's Loco Foco or radical Democratic supporters in New York. Martin Van Buren rides past New York's Tammany Hall in a luxurious British carriage. With him are editors and advisers Frances Preston Blair and Amos Kendall. The carriage is drawn by supporters, one wearing a fireman's hat marked "No.5." A crowd looks on, and two youthful "Loco Foco" match-vendors wave as the coach passes. Blair: "Well my democratic friends this is really a triumph! What will the Federal Whigs say to it." Kendall: "You told me Matty that you could make the Tammany men do do anything--I see you can!" Van Buren: "These are my loyal subjects! old Tammany never fails to do her duty on a Pinch!" Others: "This is truly royal--great as the Coronation--what a humbug is this Democracy." "This beats our reception of Hunt & Cobbett at Spittalfield." ". . . LaFayette's entry was a fool to this." An elderly man in the crowd: "I must have a seat in Congress again to speak of this Triumph." The coach's driver: "This is True Democracy--a triumph of principle." Weitenkampf dates the print 1838, but several factors argue against this. The matter of Van Buren's purportedly regal life-style and preference for foreign goods figured large in the Whig campaign of 1840. (It was given prominence by Pennsylvania Representative Charles Ogle's lengthy philippic on the subject in Congress during April of that year.) In addition, editors Blair and Kendall emerged as Van Buren's most powerful publicists during the 1840 race.|Drawn by "HD" (Henry Dacre?).|Lith. of H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 54.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-35. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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A Democratic Voter

A Democratic Voter

The artist satirizes the split in party loyalties between the Locofoco and ... (more)

The artist satirizes the split in party loyalties between the Locofoco and Tammany factions of New York City Democrats. In particular he belittles the Irish immigrants widely recruited by the party at the time. The print may have apeared during the elections of 1836. An Irishman stands on a platform before two booths, one marked "Tammany Committee" and the other "Locofoco Committee," and says, "As I'm a hindependent Helector, I means to give my Vote according to conscience and him as Tips most!" Beyond the platform is a crowd of voters, one holding a sign "Vote for Hoxie" (Joseph Hoxie, a prominent figure in New York Whig politics).|Pubd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.Y.|Signed: N. Sarony (Napoleon Sarony).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 47.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1836-20. (less)

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Humanities
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
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Collection:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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The Forty Thieves Or The Common Scoundrels of New-York

The Forty Thieves Or The Common Scoundrels of New-York

The title continues: "Breaking up of a Grand Spree in the Tea ... (more)

The title continues: "Breaking up of a Grand Spree in the Tea Room & total abflustification of the common scoundrels." Weitenkampf calls the print a satirical look at members of the New York Common Council "after a spree of eating and drinking," and cites two others by Elton. The artist also suggests corruption in that Tammany-controlled civic body, a center of Democratic power in 1840. It is a crowded scene of drunken merriment. In the foreground are several comical figures in various attitudes, including a reeling heavy-set man who says, "I'm affraid I've not done me juty to me w-a-r-d this evening, let me see what I've had: three Oyster stews . . . " He leans on a smaller man who says, "Don't make yourself uneasy Sir, if you havent done your duty on this occassion, I would like to see the man who has & if there is such a man all I want is his Daguerreotype Likeness to hang on the inside of my shirt to remember him by . . ." (Daguerreotypes were first introduced in 1839, and portrait studios had opened in several major cities in the United States by early 1840.) On the right two others converse. One, with a bulbous red nose, lifts his glass aloft. The second holds a bag marked "40,000." The first says, "Ah! that's the talk! let me see with that amount of stuff, I can cut out forty pairs of pantaloons with a thousand sets of trimmings for each man, o yes Sir depend on it, the documents shall be forthcoming!" The second, "Here is the Stuff for pantaloons & I hope now you will put that matter through & let me have the contract without delay." In the middle ground left a black manservant holds a tray of cups before the open door to a "Tea Room."|For sale at 124 Nassau St. N.Y.|Probably drawn by John L. Magee.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Murrell, p. 162, 164.|Weitenkampf, p. 68-69.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1840-1. (less)

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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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Going The Whole Hog

Going The Whole Hog

Martin Van Buren's New York political favorites are represented as piglets suckled ... (more)

Martin Van Buren's New York political favorites are represented as piglets suckled by a giant sow "The Empire State." The artist's pointed reference is to the exploitation of New York State by the President and his supporters. The piglets nursed by the sow bear the names "The Regency" and "Tammany Hall" (popular names for the state and city Democratic machines respectively), "Weigh master General," the names of various patronage positions and of banks friendly to the administration, and the "Safety Fund." On the left other piglets, representing applications for bank charters and government offices and "The Times," await the sleeping sow's attention. Van Buren (left) and a stout Dutchman (a stereotyped character often used to represent New York State) look on. Van Buren: Was ever man blest with such a fine old sow and litter of pigs! They have made me the greatest man in the Union, and even follow me every where! Dutchman: Myn Got dey will suck de very life's blood out of dat old sow, I never seen pigs suck so in all myn life. Got for damn such a breed! Myn Vrow would not have dem on de farm.|Printed and published by H.R. Robinson, 48 & 52 Cortlandt St. New York.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 51.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-15. (less)

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Humanities
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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June Bugs Squirting

June Bugs Squirting

Tammany Hall's political manipulation of the New York Fire Department is the ... (more)

Tammany Hall's political manipulation of the New York Fire Department is the artist's obvious target here, although the print's precise meaning is unclear. The frame of reference may be the creation, in 1839, of a number of "paper" fire companies by the Tammany-controlled city council, a measure devised to give them a significant number of new voting representatives on the Board of Foremen and Assistants. The companies were organized by loyal Tammanyites during June of that year and nicknamed "June Bugs" by an indignant public. The artist shows a number of firemen spraying water on a fire in the building of "Willis, Nichols, Howe, Timpson, Lee & Co." On the backs of their coats symbols, indicative of their trades or businesses (including a druggist's mortar and pestle, a poundcake, a mason's trowel), have been painted by a man who runs off to the right announcing, "24 new Companies. Mr. Chief at your service." Conspicuous on the far left is a man, possibly Democratic mayor Isaac Varian, who watches saying, "This 'werry' plan I recommended in my Message." From the new "firemen" come the following remarks: "Collecting taxes pays better than this." "I must be either Commissioner or property saver." "I'll bet $100 he'll be Chief." "I didn't know there was to be an election tomorrow night" (possibly alluding to the controversial 1839 election of a new chief engineer of the Fire Department). "James I think they'l get enough this time." Two firemen on the right hold amplifying horns. One says, "Lay it on the table eh! John we must pay 'em for that if we don't I'll be damned." The other, with a wagon wheel on the back of his coat, says, "Up with her up to the hub by J--s." A fireman leaning from a window shouts, "Play away no. 140 we want your assistance we can't get down."|H.R. Robinson's Lith; 52 Cortlandt, & no. 2 Wall St. N.Y.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 52.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1839-16. (less)

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Humanities
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
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Collection:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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Major Joe Bunker's Last Parade, Or The Fix of A Senator and His 700 Independents

Major Joe Bunker's Last Parade, Or The Fix of A Senator and His 700 Independents

Democratic senator Nathaniel P. Tallmadge of New York was the leader of ... (more)

Democratic senator Nathaniel P. Tallmadge of New York was the leader of the conservative or pro-Bank Democrats. Here Clay satirizes Tallmadge's attempts to undermine party support for Van Buren's hard money fiscal agenda, whose cornerstone was his independent treasury program. The cartoon most likely dates from September 1837, when a coalition of Loco Foco and moderate Democrats robbed the conservative wing of the party of much of its support. Tallmadge appears here in the character of the Yankee militia officer "Joe Bunker," from James Hackett's comic play, "Down East, or the Militia Muster." He marches toward the right where a group of men rally beneath a "Madisonian" banner. (The "Madisonian" was a newspaper advocating the soft-money or pro-Bank interests of the Democratic party). Tallmadge turns to realize that his troops have deserted him to watch a parade of soldiers with a standard "The Message" moving toward the left. The "Message" was Van Buren's important September 14 message to Congress wherein he proposed his independent treasury system, as well as the temporary issue of treasury notes to alleviate the effects of the Panic of 1837. The soldiers loiter under the sign of the Van Buren Hotel. One calls out, "Hallo! Pigtail, you're wrong." Tallmadge also addresses his pigtailed fellow officer, "Blood and Nassacreeation! aint they comin' Captn Ben c. I swow I don't believe they see our colour." Pigtail responds, "If they dont, I'll oppose 'em, if it costs me $1600 and two more bullet holes in my hat." The men under the "Madisonian" banner lament, "We might as well go to Texas!," "Alas! poor Williamsburg," and "We're in the minority." Behind them is the "New National Bank." The expression "go to Texas" may refer to the contemporary code "Gone to Texas," used by embezzlers of the period."|Entered . . . 1837 by H.R. Robinson . . . Southern District of New York.|Signed with monogram: C (Edward Williams Clay).|The Library's impression was registered for copyright on September 16, 1837.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Davison, "E.W. Clay and the American Political Caricature Business," p. 104-105.|Weitenkampf, p. 50.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-13. (less)

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Humanities
Social Sciences
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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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Metropolis: History of New York City, Fall 2009

Metropolis: History of New York City, Fall 2009

Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as ... (more)

Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hatta, or as some still have it, 'The Manhattoes'; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish... At length, when the council was almost in despair, a burgher, remarkable for the size and squareness of his head, proposed that they should call it New-Amsterdam. The proposition took every body by surprise; it was so striking, so apposite, so ingenious. The name was adopted by acclamation, and New-Amsterdam the metropolis was thenceforth called. --Washington Irving, 1808 In less tongue-in-cheek style, this course examines the evolution of New York City from 1607 to the present. The readings focus on the city's social and physical histories, and the class discussions compare New York's development to patterns in other cities. (less)

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New Edition of Macbeth. Bank-Oh's! Ghost

New Edition of Macbeth. Bank-Oh's! Ghost

Another satire on the Panic of 1837, again condemning Van Buren's continuation ... (more)

Another satire on the Panic of 1837, again condemning Van Buren's continuation of predecessor Andrew Jackson's hard-money policies as the source of the crisis. Clay shows the president haunted by the ghost of Commerce, which is seated at the far right end of a table which he shares with a southern planter (far left) and a New York City Tammany Democrat. Commerce has been strangled by the Specie Circular, an extremely unpopular order issued by the Jackson administration in December 1836, requiring collectors of public revenues to accept only gold or silver (i.e., "specie") in payment for public lands. The ghost displays a sheaf of papers, including one marked "Repeal of the Specie Circular," and notices of bank failures in New Orleans, Philadelphia, and New York. Van Buren recoils at the sight of the specter, exclaiming, "Never shake thy gory locks at me, thou can'st not say I did it." Jackson, in a bonnet and dress made of bunting, turns away saying, "Never mind him gentlemen, the creature's scared, and has some conscience left; but by the Eternal we must shake that out of him." Planter (a note reading "Cotton Planters Specie in "Purse." Alabama" protrudes from his pocket): "No credit. Huzza!!" Tammany Irishman (raising a glass): "Down with the Bank!!"|Printed & pubd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt Street, N. York.|Signed with monogram: C (Edward Williams Clay).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Century, p. 48.|Davison, no. 92.|Hess and Kaplan, p. 202.|Weitenkampf, p. 49.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-7. (less)

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Humanities
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Collection:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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Set To Between Old Hickory and Bully Nick

Set To Between Old Hickory and Bully Nick

Satire on the public conflict between Andrew Jackson and Nicholas Biddle over ... (more)

Satire on the public conflict between Andrew Jackson and Nicholas Biddle over the future of the Bank of the United States, and the former's campaign to destroy it. The print is sympathetic to Jackson, portraying him as the champion of the common man against the moneyed interests of the Bank. In the center Biddle (left) and Jackson square off. An obese woman, Mother Bank, holding a bottle of port stands beside Biddle. Behind her are Biddle supporters Daniel Webster and Henry Clay. Mother Bank: "Darken his day lights, Nick Put the Screws to him my tulip!" Webster: "Blow me tight if Nick ain't been crammed too much You see as how he's losing his wind!" On the right are Jackson's supporters: Martin Van Buren, Major Jack Downing and "Joe Tammany," a frontiersman in buckskins and raccoon cap. On the ground next to Tammany is a bottle of "Old Monongohala Whiskey." Downing: "I swan if the Ginral hain't been taken lessons from Fuller!" Tammany: "Hurrah my old yallow flower of the forrest, walk into him like a streak of Greased lightning through a gooseberry bush!" Below a mock account of the event, as reported in the Washington "Globe," is given: "This celebrated fight took place at Washington in 1834, . . . Several long and severe rounds were fought, and from the immense sums bet, many of the fancy were losers to a large amount Old Mother B. is said to have backed her champion to the tune of more than $150,000--Nick's weight of metal was superior as well as his science, but neither were sufficient for the pluck and wind of Hickory, who shewed his through training and sound condition so effectually that in the last round Nick was unable to come to time and gave in.|Entered Southern District of New York 1834 by Anthony Imbert; for sale wholesale & retail at 104 Broadway.|The print was recorded as deposited for copyright by Imbert on March 5, 1834. This impression lacks the imprint "Drawn by one of the Fancy" found on impressions cited by Weitenkampf and Murrell.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Murrell, p. 132.|Weitenkampf, p. 34.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1834-4. (less)

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Humanities
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Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
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Collection:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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Sub Treasurers Meeting In England

Sub Treasurers Meeting In England

A satire on corruption among Tammany officeholders in New York, showing absconded ... (more)

A satire on corruption among Tammany officeholders in New York, showing absconded former Collector of the Port Samuel Swartwout and federal District Attorney William M. Price in London. The massive fraud and embezzlement by the two officials was exposed in late November 1838 and was used in the Whig press as an indictment of Van Buren's "Sub-Treasury" or independent treasury program. (See also "Price Current," no. 1838-21). Swartwout fled to Europe and was soon followed by Price. In the print the two men embrace, Swartwout (on the left) concealing a purse marked $1,500,000 and Price concealing one marked $1,200,000. (Various inflated estimates of the two men's take were cited early in the investigation.) On a wall at left is a poster for the Theatre Royal, featuring "First appearance From U. S. America. New Way to Pay Old Debts. Raising the Wind. Catch him who can." These names echo Elizabethan and Jacobean drawma titles. Swartout says: Welcome thou pearl of wondrous "Price."/ Thou oracle of Tammany Hall./ I hope you've got a handsome slice./ Since I've in motion put the ball. Price answers: Of Ex Collectors you're the man/ I wear within my heart of hearts;/ From pure regard, all that I can/ I've done and come to foreign parts:/ And though defaulter I may be/ & cause my party great regret./ Fees (when in Office) due to me,/ Will fairly balance all my debt.|Entd . . . 1838 by H.R. Robinson.|Printed & publd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt & 11-1/2 Wall St. N.Y.|The print was registered for copyright on December 14, 1838.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 54.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1838-20. (less)

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Humanities
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Collection:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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The Three Mares/Mayors, New York Course, Spring Races, 1838

The Three Mares/Mayors, New York Course, Spring Races, 1838

A satire on the 1838 New York mayoralty contest, here shown as ... (more)

A satire on the 1838 New York mayoralty contest, here shown as a horse race between (left to right) Whig candidate Aaron Clark, Democrat Richard Riker, and Loco Foco Democrat Isaac L. Varian. Clark is clearly in the lead. He waves his hat, saying to Riker who is close behind him, "Whip up Mr. Recorder, or Loco Foco will up with you neck and neck." The bespectacled Riker reassures him, "Dont be alarmed, you see he has bolted already, the 'ends of justice' will keep him at a distance." Varian's horse rears up and turns in the wrong direction spilling Varian's hat and box of "Loco Foco Matches" to the ground. Varian cries, "Confound the jade, she has kicked out of the traces, --this Locofocoism is carrying too much weight, them is my sentiments, shade of Sam Purdy, come to my relief, or I am distanced." From the spectators in the background come various remarks: "Aaron goes it in fine style, on his blood mare." "Yes I'll bet ten to one he wins the plate." "Dickey's [i.e., Riker's] racker shows signs of age, they say he's 21 years old." " Hoorawr! for Dickey, he's the "little joker!" "Varian shows signs of distress, he's heaving over part of his cargo." "I think he's rather dumfoozled, werry!" "If Varian aint distanced I'm a nigger."|Ent'd . . . 1838 by H.R. Robinson . . . New York.|Signed: Shanks (probably Edward Williams Clay).|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 57.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1838-6. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
Social Sciences
Material Type:
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Collection:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Provider:
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Triumphal Procession of The Eagle and Other Birds, At The April Election 1837

Triumphal Procession of The Eagle and Other Birds, At The April Election 1837

A parade of jubilant New York City Whigs, led by successful mayoral ... (more)

A parade of jubilant New York City Whigs, led by successful mayoral candidate Aaron Clark (at right, with walking stick). Clark, who defeated Tammany candidate John J. Morgan in the Spring election, walks arm-in-arm with an unidentified man. He is followed by an Irishman carrying a sign which reads "Fortune's Favorite Aaron Clark." Perched on the sign is an eagle complaining that "I'm d--d sick of this set!!" He is followed by drum and fife players and several other men. On the left is a tall man seated at a small table on which are a box and a sign "Whig Nomination for Mayor Aaron Clark."|Signed: Brown fecit.|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 51.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-4. (less)

Subject:
Humanities
Social Sciences
Material Type:
Images and Illustrations
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Collection:
Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
Provider:
Library of Congress
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The Would-Be Mayor Preparing To Quell A Riot

The Would-Be Mayor Preparing To Quell A Riot

A disparaging portrayal of New York Tammany Democrats and their candidate for ... (more)

A disparaging portrayal of New York Tammany Democrats and their candidate for mayor in the April 1837 municipal elections. Here the angular, aristocratic candidate John J. Morgan presents a striking contrast to the rioting Irishmen and Germans of the party's rank and file. Morgan approaches from the right, shaded by an umbrella held by a uniformed attendant as another attendant follows with an armchair. The group is preceded by a Negro boy carrying two pistols. At left a fracas transpires. Two ragged men, possibly members of the Loco Foco faction of the party, look on. One says, "Is that our candidate Bob? introduce me; the party are strangers to him." (The Loco Foco candidate was David R. Jacques). Comments from the brawlers include, "Well, poor Tammany is done over when such a skeleton is to represent the great democracy!" and "Do'nt whistle in the face of the new Mayor, he may catch the grippe!" and "Vel vot of it, who cares for Mr. Morgan, a good puff will blow him away . . ." Despite the fact that Morgan is referred to in the cartoon as mayor, he was defeated in the election by Whig opponent Aaron Clark.|Printed & pubd. by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. N.York|Title appears as it is written on the item.|Weitenkampf, p. 51.|Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)|Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1837-3. (less)

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Library of Congress - Cartoons 1766-1876
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2002 llaF ,gnivloS melborP gnireenignE dna sretupmoC ot noitcudortnI

2002 llaF ,gnivloS melborP gnireenignE dna sretupmoC ot noitcudortnI

.desu si egaugnal gnimmargorp avaJ ehT .gninnalp dna ,tnemeganam ,ecneics ,gnireenigne ni ... (more)

.desu si egaugnal gnimmargorp avaJ ehT .gninnalp dna ,tnemeganam ,ecneics ,gnireenigne ni smelborp gnivlos rof seuqinhcet gnipoleved no si sisahpmE .scipot decnavda detceles dna scihparg retupmoc ,gnihcraes dna gnitros ,serutcurts atad ,sdohtem laciremun ,secafretni resu lacihparg ,stpecnoc gnimmargorp revoc smelborp gnimmargorp ylkeeW .esruoc eht fo sucof eht si tnempoleved dna ngised erawtfos detneiro-tcejbO .snoitacilppa cifitneics dna gnireenigne rof sdohtem lanoitatupmoc dna tnempoleved erawtfos latnemadnuf stneserp esruoc sihT (less)

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